1992–93 NCAA football bowl games

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1992–93 NCAA football bowl games
Season1992
Number of bowls18
Bowl gamesDecember 18, 1992 –
January 1, 1993
National Championship1993 Sugar Bowl
Location of ChampionshipLouisiana Superdome,
New Orleans, Louisiana
ChampionsAlabama Crimson Tide
Bowl record by conference
Conference Bowls Record Final AP Poll
MAC 1 1–0 (1.000) 0
Big West 1 0–1 (0.000) 0

The 1992–93 NCAA football bowl games were a series of post-season games played in December 1992 and January 1993 to end the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. A total of 18 team-competitive games,[1] and two all-star games, were played. The post-season began with the Las Vegas Bowl on December 18, 1992, and concluded on January 16, 1993, with the season-ending Senior Bowl.

Schedule[edit]

Date Game Site Time
(US EST)
TV Matchup
(pre-game record)
AP
pre-game
rank
UPI (Coaches)
pre-game
rank
12/14 Las Vegas Bowl Sam Boyd Stadium
Whitney, Nevada
  ESPN Bowling Green 35 (9–2) (MAC Champion),
Nevada 34 (7–4) (Big West Champion)
NR
NR
NR
NR
12/25 Aloha Bowl Aloha Stadium
Honolulu, Hawaii
  ABC Kansas 23 (7–4) (Big Eight),
BYU 20 (8–4) (WAC co-Champion)
NR
#25
NR
#23
12/28 Freedom Bowl Anaheim Stadium
Anaheim, California
  Raycom Fresno State 24 (8–4) (WAC co-Champion),
USC 7 (6–4–1) (Pac-10)
NR
#23
NR
#25
12/29 Copper Bowl Arizona Stadium
Tucson, Arizona
  ESPN Washington State 31 (8–3) (Pac-10),
Utah 28 (6–5) (WAC)
#18
NR
#18
NR
12/30 Holiday Bowl [2] Jack Murphy Stadium
San Diego, California
  ESPN Hawaii 27 (10–2) (WAC co-Champion),
Illinois 17 (6–4–1) (Big Ten)
NR
NR
#24
NR
12/31 John Hancock Bowl Sun Bowl Stadium
El Paso, Texas
  CBS Baylor 20 (6–5) (SWC),
Arizona 15 (6–4–1) (Pac-10)
NR
#22
NR
#22
12/31 Gator Bowl Gator Bowl Stadium
Jacksonville, Florida
  TBS Florida 27 (8–4) (SEC),
NC State 10 (9–2–1) (ACC)
#14
#12
#15
#12
12/31 Liberty Bowl Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium
Memphis, Tennessee
  ESPN Ole Miss 13 (8–3) (SEC),
Air Force 0 (7–4) (WAC)
#20
NR
#19
NR
12/31 Independence Bowl Independence Stadium
Shreveport, Louisiana
    Wake Forest 39 (7–4) (ACC),
Oregon 35 (6–5) (Pac-10)
NR
NR
NR
NR
1/1 Florida Citrus Bowl [3] Florida Citrus Bowl
Orlando, Florida
12:00 PM ABC Georgia 21 (9–2) (SEC),
Ohio State 14 (8–2–1) (Big Ten)
#8
#15
#8
#14
1/1 Hall of Fame Bowl Tampa Stadium
Tampa, Florida
  ESPN Tennessee 38 (8–3) (SEC),
Boston College 23 (8–2–1) (Big East)
#17
#16
#17
#16
1/1 Cotton Bowl Classic[4] Cotton Bowl
Dallas, Texas
1:30 PM CBS Notre Dame 28 (9–1–1) (Independent),
Texas A&M 3 (12–0) (SWC Champion)
#5
#4
#5
#3
1/1 Blockbuster Bowl Joe Robbie Stadium
Miami Gardens, Florida
  CBS Stanford 24 (9–3) (Pac-10),
Penn State 3 (7–4) (Independent)
#13
#21
#13
#21
1/1 Fiesta Bowl[5] Sun Devil Stadium
Tempe, Arizona
  NBC Syracuse 26 (9–2) (Big East),
Colorado 22 (9–2–1) (Big Eight)
#6
#10
#9
#6
1/1 Rose Bowl[6] Rose Bowl
Pasadena, California
4:30 PM ABC Michigan 38 (8–0–3) (Big Ten Champion),
Washington 14 (9–2) (Pac-10 co-Champion)
#7
#9
#7
#11
1/1 Sugar Bowl[7] Louisiana Superdome
New Orleans, Louisiana
7:00 PM ABC Alabama 34 (12–0) (SEC Champion),
Miami (FL) 13 (11–0) (Big East Champion)
#2
#1
#2
#1
1/1 Orange Bowl[8] Miami Orange Bowl
Miami
8:00 PM NBC Florida State 27 (10–1) (ACC Champion),
Nebraska 14 (9–2) (Big Eight Champion)
#3
#11
#4
#10
1/2 Peach Bowl Georgia Dome
Atlanta
    North Carolina 21 (8–3) (ACC),
Mississippi State 17 (7–4) (SEC)
#24
#19
NR
#20

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1992 College Football Bowl Games". Sports Reference. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  2. ^ "SIMS, HAWAII TURN BACK ILLINOIS IN HOLIDAY BOWL". Washington Post. December 31, 1992. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  3. ^ "Georgia runs over Ohio State CITRUS BOWL/ Georgia 21, Ohio state 14 QB Zeier excels; late TD decisive". Baltimore Sun. January 2, 1993. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  4. ^ "Irish rest case with 7-game win streak COTTON BOWL/ Notre Dame 28, Texas A&M; 3 Notre Dame hands Texas A&M; 1st loss". Baltimore Sun. January 2, 1993. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  5. ^ "Syracuse Leaves Colorado Kicking Self : Fiesta: Buffaloes' missed extra points, field goal combine with Dar Dar's long runback in a 26-22 victory by the Orangemen". Los Angeles Times. January 2, 1993. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  6. ^ "ROSE BOWL". Washington Post. January 2, 1993. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  7. ^ "COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Roll Tide! Alabama Dethrones No. 1 Miami". New York Times. January 2, 1993. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  8. ^ "Florida State 27, Nebraska 14". United Press International. January 1, 1993. Retrieved December 23, 2018.