1992–93 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

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1992–93 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
West Regional Champions (Vacated)
1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, West #1 Seed, Runner Up (Vacated)
Conference Big Ten Conference
1992–93 record 0-4 (31-5 unadjusted) (0-3 Big Ten)
Head coach Steve Fisher
Assistant coach Brian Dutcher
Assistant coach Jay Smith
Assistant coach Perry Watson
MVP Chris Webber
Captain Rotating
Home arena Crisler Arena
Seasons
« 1991–92 1993–94 »
1992–93 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#1 Indiana 17 1   .944     31 4   .886
#13 Iowa 11 7   .611     23 9   .719
Illinois 11 7   .611     19 13   .594
Minnesota 9 9   .500     22 10   .688
#22 Purdue 9 9   .500     18 10   .643
Ohio State 8 10   .444     15 13   .536
Michigan State 7 11   .389     15 13   .536
Wisconsin 7 11   .389     14 14   .500
Northwestern 3 15   .167     8 19   .296
Penn State 2 16   .111     7 20   .259
#3 Michigan 0 3   .000     0 4   .000
Rankings from AP Poll
*Michigan vacated all games due to NCAA sanctions.
Disputed record (15-3, 31-5)

The 1992–93 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1992–93 season. The team played its home games in the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was a member of the Big Ten Conference. Under the direction of head coach Steve Fisher, the team finished tied for second in the Big Ten Conference.[1] Although the team compiled a 31-5 record during the season, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has adjusted the team's record to 0-4 due to the University of Michigan basketball scandal.[2] The team earned an invitation to the 1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament where it was national runner up.[3] The team was ranked for the entire eighteen weeks of Associated Press Top Twenty-Five Poll, starting the season ranked first, holding the number one position for three weeks and ending ranked third,[4] and it ended the season ranked fourth in the final USA Today/CNN Poll.[5] The team had an 8–5 record against ranked opponents, including the following victories: December 28, 1992 against #20 Nebraska 88–73 in the Rainbow Classic at the Blaisdell Center, December 29 against #5 North Carolina 79–78 in the Rainbow Classic, December 30 against #2 Kansas 86–74 in the Rainbow Classic, January 7, 1993 against #9 Purdue 80–70 at Mackey Arena, February 2 against #25 Michigan State 73–69 at the Breslin Student Events Center, February 7 against #19 Purdue 84–76 at Crisler Arena, March 2 against #15 Iowa 82–73 at Crisler Arena, April 2 against #2 Kentucky 81–78 (OT) at the Superdome in the 1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[6]

The team had rotating captains on a game-by-game basis, and Chris Webber earned team MVP.[7] The team's leading scorers were Chris Webber (690 points), Jalen Rose (555 points), and Juwan Howard (524 points). The leading rebounders were Webber (362), Howard (267), and Eric Riley (169).[8]

During the season the team set a Big Ten Conference record for single-season blocked shots (193) that would last until 2000.[9]

During the season, the team won the Big Ten Conference statistical championships in rebounding and rebounding margin with at 40.9 average and 7.6 average margin in conference games, respectively.[10] The record-setting team also led the conference in average blocked shots (5.0).[10] Chris Webber led the Big Ten in rebounds with a 9.7 average in 18 conference games and 10.1 average in 36 overall games.[11][12]

The team surpassed the 30-win total by the 1989 team with 31 victories and continues to be the winningest team in school history.[13]

For the second year in a row, the team set the school record for single-season team blocks with 193 in 36 games, surpassing the 182 in 34 games set the prior year. The record would stand until 2007.[14]

Four players surpassed Jalen Rose's single-season minutes played record set the prior season. Rose set the new and current single-season record of 1234. King played 1174 minutes, while Webber and Howard contributed 1138 and 1135, respectively.[15]

Regular season[edit]

Michigan returned its top nine scorers and began the season ranked number one in the country by the Associated Press.[16] Michigan lost its second game of the season in a rematch with Duke.[17]

NCAA tournament[edit]

Michigan was given the #1 seed in that year's West Regional and played their first and second round games at the McKale Center in Tucson. They defeated Coastal Carolina in their first game and then were taken to overtime by #9 seed UCLA before escaping with a victory.

The Wolverines moved on to the Kingdome for the regionals. The sub-regional had been littered with upsets, as the #12, #13, and #15 seeds had all won in the first round. Michigan drew #12 seeded George Washington and won, then faced Temple for the second consecutive year (having defeated them as a #6 seed the year before) and beating them 77–72 to join Kentucky, Kansas, and North Carolina in the Final Four in New Orleans. In their national semifinal at the Superdome on April 3, the team defeated Southeast Regional winner Kentucky 81–78 in overtime.

In the championship game at the Superdome on April 5, the Wolverines lost to East Regional winner North Carolina 77–71. Michigan's final possession of the game went down as one of the most memorable moments in college basketball history. With twenty seconds to go and Michigan trailing by two and out of timeouts, Chris Webber rebounded a missed free throw. Confused as to what to do next, Webber thought about passing to Jalen Rose but did not and took a step without dribbling the basketball. The officials did not see the travel, however, and Webber headed upcourt where North Carolina was set up in a half court trap defense. Webber ran directly into the trap and was double teamed in the corner. He could not break the double team to pass the ball, and called for a timeout that the Wolverines did not have. By rule, Michigan was given a technical foul for calling the extra timeout and North Carolina was given two free throws and possession of the ball. North Carolina made their free throws, then added two more when Michigan was forced to foul again after the change in possession.[3][6]

The team established numerous NCAA records for three-point field goals in the final four: fewest single-game three-point field goals made in a final four (0 vs. Kentucky on April 3, 1993 in an overtime and fewest single-game three-point field goals attempted (4 vs. Kentucky).[18] The 0 three-point field goals made surpassed the team's previous record of 1 made against Duke the year before in the 1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[18]

Later developments[edit]

In 2002, the Wolverines vacated their entire 1992–93 season, including their tournament appearance, in the wake of a major scandal involving many years of improper payments from a major booster to several former players, among them Webber.

Statistics[edit]

The team posted the following statistics:[19]

Name GP GS Min Avg FG FGA FG% 3FG 3FGA 3FG% FT FTA FT% OR DR RB Avg Ast Avg PF DQ TO Stl Blk Pts Avg
Chris Webber* 36 36 1138 31.6 281 454 0.619 27 80 0.338 101 183 0.552 155 207 362 10.1 90 2.5 102 4 105 49 90 690 19.2
Jalen Rose 36 36 1234 34.3 203 455 0.446 33 103 0.320 116 161 0.721 37 113 150 4.2 140 3.9 82 1 113 43 15 555 15.4
Juwan Howard 36 36 1135 31.5 206 407 0.506 0 2 0.000 112 160 0.700 94 173 267 7.4 69 1.9 99 3 92 21 14 524 14.6
Jimmy King 36 36 1174 32.6 148 291 0.509 37 92 0.402 57 88 0.648 58 101 159 4.4 110 3.1 75 2 84 57 19 390 10.8
Ray Jackson 29 26 657 22.7 105 213 0.493 2 13 0.154 50 79 0.633 46 72 118 4.1 67 2.3 78 3 53 27 10 262 9.0
Eric Riley 35 0 528 15.1 78 133 0.586 0 1 0.000 39 53 0.736 63 106 169 4.8 14 0.4 82 2 37 15 31 195 5.6
Rob Pelinka 36 4 571 15.9 50 120 0.417 24 60 0.400 32 42 0.762 37 39 76 2.1 35 1.0 49 0 17 6 1 156 4.3
James Voskuil 33 6 390 11.8 33 94 0.351 23 48 0.479 13 20 0.650 13 47 60 1.8 17 0.5 49 0 25 8 6 102 3.1
Michael Talley 29 0 249 8.6 15 55 0.273 4 16 0.250 3 5 0.600 5 11 16 0.6 32 1.1 24 0 19 7 0 37 1.3
Jason Bossard 10 0 25 2.5 7 19 0.368 1 10 0.100 0 3 0.000 3 0 3 0.3 0 0.0 3 0 3 0 0 15 1.5
Leon Derricks 14 0 62 4.4 4 14 0.286 0 1 0.000 3 7 0.429 5 13 18 1.3 3 0.2 10 0 4 2 5 11 0.8
Dugan Fife 20 0 122 6.1 0 9 0.000 0 4 0.000 10 17 0.588 6 11 17 0.9 13 0.7 13 0 11 7 0 10 0.5
Sean Dobbins 10 0 12 1.2 1 3 0.333 0 0 1 4 0.250 1 1 2 0.2 0 0.0 4 0 0 0 0 3 0.3
Ricky Guzman 3 0 3 1.0 0 1 0.000 0 1 0.000 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0.0
TEAM 36 43 34 77 2.1
Season Total 36 1131 2268 0.499 151 431 0.350 537 822 0.653 566 928 1494 41.5 590 16.4 671 15 564 242 191 2950 81.9
Opponents 36 943 2275 0.415 202 578 0.349 498 720 0.692 518 693 1211 33.6 462 12.8 720 22 529 226 98 2586 71.8
* Denotes players whose individual records, awards and other honors have been vacated due to NCAA and U-M sanctions

Rankings[edit]

Ranking movements
Legend: ██ Increase in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Final 
AP Poll[4] 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 3 2 5 5 7 4 5 5 4 3 3


Awards and honors[edit]

  • Chris Webber, All-America selection (vacated as a result of the scandal)
  • Rob Pelinka, Walter Byers Scholar (top male scholar-athlete in all NCAA sports; not vacated)

Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Five players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[20][21][22]

Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1993 1 1 1 Chris Webber Orlando Magic
1993 2 6 33 Eric Riley Dallas Mavericks
1994 1 5 5 Juwan Howard Washington Bullets
1994 1 13 13 Jalen Rose Denver Nuggets
1995 2 6 35 Jimmy King Toronto Raptors

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 69. Retrieved 2010-09-14. 
  2. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 56. Retrieved 2010-09-23. 
  3. ^ a b "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 3. Retrieved 2010-09-14. 
  4. ^ a b "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 68–83. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  5. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 87. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  6. ^ a b "Through The Years". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 45. Retrieved 2010-09-20. 
  7. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 9–10. Retrieved 2010-09-14. 
  8. ^ "Men's Basketball Statistic Archive Query Page". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. Retrieved September 22, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 29. Retrieved 2010-09-16. 
  10. ^ a b "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 38. Retrieved 2010-09-17. 
  11. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 34. Retrieved 2010-09-17. 
  12. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 35. Retrieved 2010-09-17. 
  13. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 16. Retrieved 2010-09-18. 
  14. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 19. Retrieved 2010-09-18. 
  15. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 20. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  16. ^ Stoda, Greg (1992-11-17). "U-M At Top Of The Polls". Detroit Free Press. 
  17. ^ Adande, J. A. (1992-12-06). "Top Tow Take a Tumble – Duke, Kansas knock Off Michigan (1), Indiana (2)". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 1, sports section. 
  18. ^ a b "The Final Four" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 10. Retrieved 2010-09-16. 
  19. ^ "Men's Basketball Statistic Archive Query Page". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 18 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-28. 
  20. ^ "1993 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  21. ^ "1994 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  22. ^ "1995 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25.