1993–94 FA Premier League

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Premier League
Season 1993–94
Champions Manchester United
2nd Premier League title
9th English title
Relegated Oldham Athletic
Sheffield United
Swindon Town
Champions League Manchester United
Cup Winners' Cup Arsenal
Chelsea
UEFA Cup Aston Villa
Blackburn Rovers
Newcastle United
Goals scored 1195
Top goalscorer Andy Cole (34)
Biggest home win Newcastle United 7–1 Swindon Town
(12 March 1994)
Biggest away win Swindon Town 0–5 Liverpool
(22 August 1993)
Swindon Town 0–5 Leeds United
(7 May 1994)
Highest scoring Norwich City 4–5 Southampton
(9 April 1994)
Longest winning run 8 games[1]
Manchester United
Longest unbeaten run 22 games[1]
Manchester United
Longest winless run 15 games[1]
Swindon Town
Longest losing run 7 games[1]
Tottenham Hotspur
Highest attendance 44,601[2]
Liverpool v Newcastle United
Lowest attendance 4,739[2]
Wimbledon v Coventry City

The 1993–94 FA Premier League (known as the FA Carling Premiership for sponsorship reasons) was the second season of the Premier League, the top division of professional football in England. Manchester United won the league by eight points over nearest challengers Blackburn Rovers, their second consecutive league title. Swindon Town finished bottom of the league in their first season of top-flight football and were relegated along with Sheffield United and Oldham Athletic.

New league sponsors[edit]

From the start of the 1993–94 season, the FA Premier League was sponsored by Carling Breweries.

[edit]

Newcastle United and West Ham United were promoted to the Premier League from the First Division as champions and runners-up respectively. The last promotion place was won by Swindon Town after their victory over Leicester City in the 1992–93 playoff final.[3] Newcastle had been relegated from the old First Division in 1989 and West Ham United had been relegated the season before the start of the Premier League. Swindon had never played top-division football before. They had won the old First Division playoffs in 1990 but were later denied promotion because of financial irregularities.

Transfers[edit]

Just before the start of the season, Roy Keane became the most expensive footballer signed by an English football team. The 22-year-old Irish midfielder left relegated Nottingham Forest for Manchester United for a fee of £3.75 million.

During the 1993–94 season, many players were transferred between Premier League clubs for fees exceeding £1 million. They included David White (Manchester City to Leeds United), David Rocastle (Leeds United to Manchester City), Roy Wegerle (Blackburn Rovers to Coventry City) and Tim Flowers (Southampton to Blackburn Rovers). At £2.5 million, Flowers became the most expensive goalkeeper in English football.

Personnel and kits[edit]

Greater London Premier League football clubs

(as of 8 May 1994)

Team Manager Captain Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Arsenal George Graham Tony Adams Adidas JVC
Aston Villa Ron Atkinson Kevin Richardson Asics Müller
Blackburn Rovers Kenny Dalglish Tim Sherwood Asics McEwan's Lager
Chelsea Glenn Hoddle Dennis Wise Umbro Amiga
Coventry City Phil Neal Brian Borrows Ribero Peugeot
Everton Mike Walker Dave Watson Umbro NEC
Ipswich Town John Lyall Steve Palmer Umbro Fisons
Leeds United Howard Wilkinson Gordon Strachan Asics Thistle Hotels
Liverpool Roy Evans Ian Rush Adidas Carlsberg
Manchester City Brian Horton Keith Curle Umbro Brother
Manchester United Alex Ferguson Bryan Robson Umbro Sharp
Newcastle United Kevin Keegan Peter Beardsley Asics McEwan's Lager
Norwich City John Deehan Ian Butterworth Ribero Norwich and Peterborough
Oldham Athletic Joe Royle Mike Milligan Umbro JD Sports
Queens Park Rangers Gerry Francis David Bardsley Clubhouse CSF
Sheffield United Dave Bassett Brian Gayle Umbro Laver
Sheffield Wednesday Trevor Francis Chris Waddle Puma Sanderson
Southampton Alan Ball Matt Le Tissier Pony Dimplex
Swindon Town John Gorman Shaun Taylor Loki Burmah
Tottenham Hotspur Osvaldo Ardiles Gary Mabbutt Umbro Holsten
West Ham United Billy Bonds Steve Potts Pony Dagenham Motors
Wimbledon Joe Kinnear Vinnie Jones Ribero LBC

Manchester United's Premier League and FA Cup double[edit]

Manchester United led the 1993–94 Premier League for almost all of the season, eventually finishing as champions eight points ahead of runners-up Blackburn Rovers. They also won the FA Cup after beating Chelsea 4–0 in the final, thereby becoming only the fourth team to achieve this feat in the 20th century (after Tottenham in 1961, Arsenal in 1971 and Liverpool in 1986). Their lead of the Premier League stood at 11 points by the end of October and peaked at 16 points two months later, but a run of bad results in March was followed by defeat at Blackburn at the beginning of April, which meant that they now led the league merely on goal difference. A return to form then saw United seal the league title with two games still to play.

Norwich City, Leeds United, Newcastle United, Everton and Aston Villa were among the sides who showed promise early in the season before Manchester United established a runaway lead. Norwich reached the third round of the UEFA Cup after famously beating Bayern Munich in the second round, but their league form slumped after manager Mike Walker departed to Everton in January, and the Norfolk side finished 12th. Everton's brief lead of the league in the opening stages of the season was followed by a slump in form, and manager Howard Kendall stepped down at the beginning of December with the Toffees now in the bottom half of the table. They only narrowly avoided relegation on the final day of the season. Aston Villa finished a disappointing 10th in the league, but won the Football League Cup for the fourth time.

Runner-up clubs[edit]

Finishing runners-up in the Premier League were Blackburn Rovers. In third place came Newcastle United, whose 22-year-old striker Andy Cole was the Premier League's leading scorer with 34 goals in 40 games, with a total of 41 goals in all competitions. In fourth place came Arsenal, who achieved success in European competition with a 1–0 win over Parma in the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup final.

Relegated teams[edit]

Swindon Town managed just five league wins all season and were relegated in bottom place having conceded 100 league goals in 42 games. Oldham Athletic, who had avoided relegation on goal difference the previous season, were relegated on the final day of the season after failing to win at Norwich City. The final relegation place went to Sheffield United, who were relegated from the top flight after a 3–2 defeat at Chelsea, with the winning goal coming in injury time (a draw would have been enough to survive, and a loss would have still been enough had Everton not won their final match). As of 2015, only one of these sides has returned to the top flight – Sheffield United in 2006, and they were relegated after one season, once again on the last day requiring only a draw to survive.

Player and managerial awards[edit]

Managerial changes[edit]

Final league table[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United 42 27 11 4 80 38 +42 92 1994–95 UEFA Champions League Group stage
2 Blackburn Rovers 42 25 9 8 63 36 +27 84 1994–95 UEFA Cup First round
3 Newcastle United 42 23 8 11 82 41 +41 77
4 Arsenal 42 18 17 7 53 28 +25 71 1994–95 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round 1
5 Leeds United 42 18 16 8 65 39 +26 70
6 Wimbledon 42 18 11 13 56 53 +3 65
7 Sheffield Wednesday 42 16 16 10 76 54 +22 64
8 Liverpool 42 17 9 16 59 55 +4 60
9 Queens Park Rangers 42 16 12 14 62 61 +1 60
10 Aston Villa 42 15 12 15 46 50 −4 57 1994–95 UEFA Cup First round 2
11 Coventry City 42 14 14 14 43 45 −2 56
12 Norwich City 42 12 17 13 65 61 +4 53
13 West Ham United 42 13 13 16 47 58 −11 52
14 Chelsea 42 13 12 17 49 53 −4 51 1994–95 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round 3
15 Tottenham Hotspur 42 11 12 19 54 59 −5 45
16 Manchester City 42 9 18 15 38 49 −11 45
17 Everton 42 12 8 22 42 63 −21 44
18 Southampton 42 12 7 23 49 66 −17 43
19 Ipswich Town 42 9 16 17 35 58 −23 43
20 Sheffield United (R) 42 8 18 16 42 60 −18 42 Relegation to 1994–95 Football League First Division
21 Oldham Athletic (R) 42 9 13 20 42 68 −26 40
22 Swindon Town (R) 42 5 15 22 47 100 −53 30

Source: Barclays Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored
1 Arsenal qualified for the Cup Winners' Cup as defending champions.
2 Aston Villa qualified for the UEFA Cup as League Cup winners.
3Chelsea qualified for the Cup Winners' Cup as FA Cup runners-up.
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.

Club by club review[edit]

Arsenal[edit]

Arsenal found goals easier to come by this time around, and combined with their ever-reliable defence, overcame this obstacle to improve to fourth place in the league up from 10th place a year earlier. There was also glory for the club in the final of the European Cup Winners' Cup.

Aston Villa[edit]

Villa dipped to 10th place in the league a year after finishing runners-up, but compensated for this by defeating manager Ron Atkinson's old club Manchester United 3-1 in the final of the League Cup.

Blackburn Rovers[edit]

With Alan Shearer back from injury, their record signing was instrumental, finding the net 31 times in the league to secure runners-up spot. Although the chasm between themselves and runaway leaders Manchester United had peaked at 16 points halfway through the season, they managed to narrow the gap between themselves and the leaders down to goal difference at the beginning of April after beating them 2-0 at Ewood Park, before a United resurgence and a couple of disappointing results for the Rovers resulted in the championship trophy staying at Old Trafford.

Chelsea[edit]

Chelsea struggled a bit in the league and dipped slightly to 14th in the final table after finishing 11th a year earlier, but new manager Glenn Hoddle took them to their first FA Cup final in 24 years, and they managed to keep Manchester United at bay until the second half, when Chelsea's defence began to leak goals and they ended up losing 4-0. Consolation for the lack of silverware was the club's first European place for over 20 years.

Coventry City[edit]

Bobby Gould had overseen some of Coventry City's best performance in a top flight spell which began in 1967, but he was gone before Christmas with Coventry still mid-table and largely free of that once all too familiar fear of relegation. His successor Phil Neal guided the Sky Blues to a secure 11th place finish.

Everton[edit]

Everton topped the Premier League after winning their first three games of the season, but then surrendered their lead to Manchester United and by the time Howard Kendall walked out on the club in early December, fear of relegation was engulfing Goodison Park. Mike Walker took over as manager in the new year, but the Toffees continued to struggle and looked set to go down after going two goals down against Wimbledon, only to go on to win the match 3-2 and avoid the drop.

Ipswich Town[edit]

John Lyall began the season as general manager at Portman Road after handing over control of the first team to coach Mick McGiven, but after the season's end he regained his first team duties as Ipswich had only avoided relegation by the narrowest of margins.

Leeds United[edit]

Leeds recovered from a dismal Premier League debut and finished fifth in the league, with the new stars of the team proving to be record signing striker Brian Deane and promising young defender Gary Kelly.

Liverpool[edit]

After nearly three years in charge, during which his popularity at Anfield had gradually slumped, Graeme Souness finally fell on his sword at the end of January after an FA Cup exit at the hands of Bristol City. Long-serving coach and former player Roy Evans was then promoted to the manager's seat, and things soon began to look up for Liverpool after a couple of barren seasons, not least with high-scoring teenage Robbie Fowler now in the first team.

Manchester City[edit]

A shortage of goals, largely due to the mid-season sale of top scorer David White and the long-term injury absence of striker Niall Quinn, counted heavily against Manchester City, who finished 16th in the league with just 36 goals all season and no player finding the net more than six times in the league.

Manchester United[edit]

A year after ending their 26-year wait for the league title, Manchester United became only the fourth team this century to win the double of the league title and FA Cup. They went top of the league after four games and stayed top for the rest of the season, although their lead which had once peaked at 16 points was slowly reduced to merely goal difference before they finally pulled together after a scare in March and early April (during which they also lost the League Cup final and the chance of a unique treble) and finished seven points clear at the top. Eric Cantona, top scorer and PFA Player of the Year, was the undoubted key driving force in United's success once again, although the likes of Ryan Giggs, Paul Ince and Mark Hughes also excelled.

Newcastle United[edit]

Newcastle United came back to the top flight with a bang after four years away, with the effective tactics and heavy spending of manager Kevin Keegan continuing to pay dividends for the Tynesiders. Andy Cole's first season of regular top flight football saw him top the Premier League's goalscoring charts with 34 goals, and a total of 41 in all competitions, while returning local hero Peter Beardsley found the net 24 times overall. Although they failed to threaten Manchester United's largely rock solid lead of the table throughout the campaign, they finally secured a third place finish in the league, and with it their first UEFA Cup place since the 1970s.

Norwich City[edit]

Qualifying for the UEFA Cup as the English league's third-placed team was indeed the pinnacle of Norwich City's history, but the success story under Mike Walker was not quite yet over at that point. They began the 1993-94 season well, regularly featuring among the teams immediately behind runaway leaders Manchester United, and pulled off one of the biggest shocks in the history of European football when they knocked Bayern Munich out of the UEFA Cup in the second round. But the European dream ended in the next stage of the competition, and in the new year Walker was on his way out of Carrow Road to succeed Howard Kendall at Everton. His assistant John Deehan took over, but Norwich's league form slumped and they finished 12th.

Oldham Athletic[edit]

Four years after taking Manchester United to a replay in the semi-finals of the FA Cup, it was the same scene again for Oldham Athletic, although this time they had the upper hand over their illustrious opponents until the final minute of the game, after going ahead in extra time at Wembley. Then came an equaliser for United from Mark Hughes, which forced a replay at Maine Road. This time Oldham were overpowered, losing 4-1. They went into the final day of the season needing victory in order to preserve their Premier League status, but could only manage a 1-1 draw at Norwich, which ended their three-year stay among the elite.

Queens Park Rangers[edit]

After finishing top out of the London clubs in the Premier League's first season, Queens Park Rangers dipped slightly to finish ninth, but at least managed to stay well clear of the relegation threat which was very real for a few of the division's more illustrious clubs.

Sheffield United[edit]

With goal machine Brian Deane now at Leeds, the Blades had a hard time in 1993-94, and on the final day of the season they went down in dramatic fashion when they surrendered a 2-1 lead over Chelsea in the final few minutes and lost 3-2, ending a four-year stay among the elite.

Sheffield Wednesday[edit]

It was another exciting season for the fans at Sheffield Wednesday, who saw their team finished seventh in the league for the second season running, and enjoy yet another good cup run, this time in the shape of a run to the semi-finals of the League Cup.

Southampton[edit]

Matthew Le Tissier was once again the hero at Southampton, as his prolific scoring kept Southampton up in 18th place. However, their disappointing form in the league had seen manager Ian Branfoot ousted halfway through the season, with legendary former Lawrie McMenemy returning to the club as director of football, and former player Alan Ball being named as manager of the first team.

Swindon Town[edit]

Swindon Town began their first top flight campaign without the man who had guided them there - their manager Glenn Hoddle, who had accepted the offer to take over at Chelsea within a week of taking Swindon to glory in the playoffs. His assistant John Gorman stayed at the County Ground as his successor, but Swindon never really adjusted to the pace of top flight football, failing to win any of their first 15 Premier League fixtures. They went down with just five wins to their name and 100 goals conceded.

Tottenham Hotspur[edit]

After a close season of drama in which chief executive and former manager Terry Venables was axed from the Tottenham board by chairman Alan Sugar, two years after the pair had joined force to take over the club, the task of steering the Tottenham ship through calm waters after a stormy few weeks fell to new manager Ossie Ardiles, an iconic former player at the club. As a manager, Ardiles had employed tactics which relied largely on attackers with very little emphasis on defence, with mixed results. At White Hart Lane, however, it didn't quite work. Spurs finished 15th in the final table, although this could also be put down to the absence of top scorer Teddy Sheringham for much of the campaign due to injuries.

West Ham United[edit]

West Ham's top flight comeback and Premier League debut brought a respectable 13th place finish, despite the loss of defender Julian Dicks to Liverpool early in the season and a shortage of top quality players in other positions.

Wimbledon[edit]

Wimbledon continued to defy the odds and once again gave the elite a serious run for their money after two seasons of mid-table mediocrity. They equalled their previous best finish of sixth place, and inflicted one of just four defeats in the league all season on double winners Manchester United.

Results[edit]

Home ╲ Away ARS AST BLB CHE COV EVE IPS LEE LIV MCI MUN NEW NOR OLD QPR SHU SHW SOU SWI TOT WHU WDN
Arsenal 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–3 2–0 4–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–2 2–1 0–0 1–1 0–0 3–0 1–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 0–2 1–1
Aston Villa 1–2 0–1 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–0 2–1 0–0 1–2 0–2 0–0 1–2 4–1 1–0 2–2 0–2 5–0 1–0 3–1 0–1
Blackburn Rovers 1–1 1–0 2–0 2–1 2–0 0–0 2–1 2–0 2–0 2–0 1–0 2–3 1–0 1–1 0–0 1–1 2–0 3–1 1–0 0–2 3–0
Chelsea 0–2 1–1 1–2 1–2 4–2 1–1 1–1 1–0 0–0 1–0 1–0 1–2 0–1 2–0 3–2 1–1 2–0 2–0 4–3 2–0 2–0
Coventry City 1–0 0–1 2–1 1–1 2–1 1–0 0–2 1–0 4–0 0–1 2–1 2–1 1–1 0–1 0–0 1–1 1–1 1–1 1–0 1–1 1–2
Everton 1–1 0–1 0–3 4–2 0–0 0–0 1–1 2–0 1–0 0–1 0–2 1–5 2–1 0–3 4–2 0–2 1–0 6–2 0–1 0–1 3–2
Ipswich Town 1–5 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–2 0–2 0–0 1–2 2–2 1–2 1–1 2–1 0–0 1–3 3–2 1–4 1–0 1–1 2–2 1–1 0–0
Leeds United 2–1 2–0 3–3 4–1 1–0 3–0 0–0 2–0 3–2 0–2 1–1 0–4 1–0 1–1 2–1 2–2 0–0 3–0 2–0 1–0 4–0
Liverpool 0–0 2–1 0–1 2–1 1–0 2–1 1–0 2–0 2–1 3–3 0–2 0–1 2–1 3–2 1–2 2–0 4–2 2–2 1–2 2–0 1–1
Manchester City 0–0 3–0 0–2 2–2 1–1 1–0 2–1 1–1 1–1 2–3 2–1 1–1 1–1 3–0 0–0 1–3 1–1 2–1 0–2 0–0 0–1
Manchester United 1–0 3–1 1–1 0–1 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 2–0 1–1 2–2 3–2 2–1 3–0 5–0 2–0 4–2 2–1 3–0 3–1
Newcastle United 2–0 5–1 1–1 0–0 4–0 1–0 2–0 1–1 3–0 2–0 1–1 3–0 3–2 1–2 4–0 4–2 1–2 7–1 0–1 2–0 4–0
Norwich City 1–1 1–2 2–2 1–1 1–0 3–0 1–0 2–1 2–2 1–1 0–2 1–2 1–1 3–4 0–1 1–1 4–5 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–1
Oldham Athletic 0–0 1–1 1–2 2–1 3–3 0–1 0–3 1–1 0–3 0–0 2–5 1–3 2–1 4–1 1–1 0–0 2–1 2–1 0–2 1–2 1–1
Queens Park Rangers 1–1 2–2 1–0 1–1 5–1 2–1 3–0 0–4 1–3 1–1 2–3 1–2 2–2 2–0 2–1 1–2 2–1 1–3 1–1 0–0 1–0
Sheffield United 1–1 1–2 1–2 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–1 2–2 0–0 0–1 0–3 2–0 1–2 2–1 1–1 1–1 0–0 3–1 2–2 3–2 2–1
Sheffield Wednesday 0–1 0–0 1–2 3–1 0–0 5–1 5–0 3–3 3–1 1–1 2–3 0–1 3–3 3–0 3–1 3–1 2–0 3–3 1–0 5–0 2–2
Southampton 0–4 4–1 3–1 3–1 1–0 0–2 0–1 0–2 4–2 0–1 1–3 2–1 0–1 1–3 0–1 3–3 1–1 5–1 1–0 0–2 1–0
Swindon Town 0–4 1–2 1–3 1–3 3–1 1–1 2–2 0–5 0–5 1–3 2–2 2–2 3–3 0–1 1–0 0–0 0–1 2–1 2–1 1–1 2–4
Tottenham Hotspur 0–1 1–1 0–2 1–1 1–2 3–2 1–1 1–1 3–3 1–0 0–1 1–2 1–3 5–0 1–2 2–2 1–3 3–0 1–1 1–4 1–1
West Ham United 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 3–2 0–1 2–1 0–1 1–2 3–1 2–2 2–4 3–3 2–0 0–4 0–0 2–0 3–3 0–0 1–3 0–2
Wimbledon 0–3 2–2 4–1 1–1 1–2 1–1 0–2 1–0 1–1 1–0 1–0 4–2 3–1 3–0 1–1 2–0 2–1 1–0 3–0 2–1 1–2

Source:[citation needed]
^ The home team is listed in the left-hand column.
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Season statistics[edit]

Total Goals: 1195
Average Goals per game: 2.58

Top goal scorers[edit]

Rank Scorer Club Goals
1 Andy Cole Newcastle United 34
2 Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers 31
3 Matt Le Tissier Southampton 25
Chris Sutton Norwich City 25
5 Ian Wright Arsenal 23
6 Peter Beardsley Newcastle United 21
7 Mark Bright Sheffield Wednesday 19
8 Eric Cantona Manchester United 18
9 Dean Holdsworth Wimbledon 17
Rod Wallace Leeds United 17

Awards[edit]

Managers of the Month[edit]

Month Manager of the Month
August 1993 Alex Ferguson (Manchester United)
September 1993 Joe Kinnear (Wimbledon)
October 1993 Mike Walker (Norwich City)
November 1993 Kevin Keegan (Newcastle United)
December 1993 Trevor Francis (Sheffield Wednesday)
January 1994 Kenny Dalglish (Blackburn Rovers)
February 1994 Joe Royle (Oldham Athletic)
March 1994 Joe Kinnear (Wimbledon)
April 1994 Joe Kinnear (Wimbledon)

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

External links[edit]