1993–94 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

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1993–94 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
NCAA Tournament, Elite Eight
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches No. 8
AP No. 11
1993–94 record 24-8 (13-5, 2nd Big Ten)
Head coach Steve Fisher
Assistant coach Brian Dutcher
Assistant coach Jay Smith
Assistant coach Scott Trost
MVP Jalen Rose
MVP Juwan Howard
Captain Jason Bossard
Captain Juwan Howard
Home arena Crisler Arena
Seasons
1993–94 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#3 Purdue 14 4   .778     29 5   .853
#11 Michigan 13 5   .722     24 8   .750
#18 Indiana 12 6   .667     21 9   .700
# 23 Minnesota 10 8   .556     21 12   .636
Michigan State 10 8   .556     20 12   .625
Illinois 10 8   .556     17 11   .607
Wisconsin 8 10   .444     18 11   .621
Penn State 6 12   .333     13 14   .481
Ohio State 6 12   .333     13 16   .448
Northwestern 5 13   .278     15 14   .517
Iowa 5 13   .278     11 16   .407
Rankings from AP Poll
*Minnesota vacated all NCAA tournament games due to sanctions against the program.
Disputed record (22-13)

The 1993–94 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1993–94 season. The team played its home games in the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was a member of the Big Ten Conference. Under the direction of head coach Steve Fisher, the team finished second in the Big Ten Conference.[1] The team earned an invitation to the 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament as a number three seed and advanced to the fourth round.[2] The team was ranked for the entire eighteen weeks of Associated Press Top Twenty-Five Poll, starting the season ranked fifth, peaking at number three and ending ranked eleventh,[3] and it also ended the season ranked eleventh in the final USA Today/CNN Poll.[4] The team went 6–6 against ranked teams including the following victories: November 26, 1993, against #13 Georgia Tech 80–70 in the Tipoff Classic in Springfield, Massachusetts, January 29, 1994, against #16 Wisconsin 79–75 at home, February 1 against #8 Purdue 63–62 on the road, February 8 against #12 Indiana 91–67 at home, February 19 against #20 Minnesota 72–65 at home, and March 19 against #12 Texas in the 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament 84–79 at Kansas Coliseum.[5]

Juwan Howard and Jason Bossard served as team co-captains, while Howard shared team MVP honors with Jalen Rose.[6] The team's leading scorers were Jalen Rose (636 points), Juwan Howard (625 points), and Jimmy King (358 points). The leading rebounders were Juwan Howard (270), Ray Jackson (195), and Jalen Rose (182).[7]

The team surpassed the 1986 team’s single-season total of 265 steals with 267 to establish the current school record.[8]

Regular season[edit]

In November 2003, Mitch Albom released his book Fab five: basketball, trash talk, the American dream chronicling the recruiting of and first two years of play of the Fab Five.[9] After Chris Webber left for the NBA, the team entered the season ranked fifth in the nation as it opened the season against number 13 Georgia Tech.[10] Michigan found itself with a 21–6, (13–4 Big Ten) record and tied with the Purdue Boilermakers for the conference lead with one game remaining.[11] Michigan then lost (for the third time in its last four games) to a struggling Northwestern Wildcats team,[12] and finished second in the conference.[13] After the season, Howard was selected as a first team All-Big-Ten member along with Glenn Robinson, Rose, Shawn Respert, and Damon Bailey.[14] In the opening round of the 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, Howard helped Michigan survive with a 78–74 overtime victory over Pepperdine by scoring 28 points and adding 9 rebounds before fouling out.[15] In the second round, Howard posted 34 points and 18 rebounds to lead the team to an 84–79 victory over Texas.[16] Michigan faced a Joe Smith-led Maryland in the Sweet Sixteen round.[13] Howard scored 24 and had 11 rebounds before fouling out with 2:49 remaining in the 78–71 victory.[17] Howard earned the regional MVP award with a game-high 30 points and 13 rebounds despite collecting two fouls in the first two minutes in the Elite Eight round against a victorious Arkansas team that had United States President Bill Clinton as a vocal supporter.[18] After the season, Howard announced his intention to enter the 1994 NBA Draft.[19] The following day, Rose announced he would enter the draft as well.[20]

Rankings[edit]

Ranking movements
Legend: ██ Increase in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Final 
AP Poll[3] 5 5 5 3 7 7 7 13 10 15 15 13 11 7 3 3 8 11


Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Four players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[21][22][23]

Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1994 1 5 5 Juwan Howard Washington Bullets
1994 1 13 13 Jalen Rose Denver Nuggets
1995 2 6 35 Jimmy King Toronto Raptors
1997 1 11 11 Olivier Saint-Jean Sacramento Kings

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 69. Retrieved September 14, 2010. 
  2. ^ "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 68–83. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 87. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Through The Years". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 45–46. Retrieved September 20, 2010. 
  6. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 9–10. Retrieved September 14, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Men's Basketball Statistic Archive Query Page". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on April 18, 2010. Retrieved September 22, 2010. 
  8. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 18. Retrieved September 18, 2010. 
  9. ^ "New Book Tells Some Fab Stories". Chicago Tribune. November 25, 1993. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  10. ^ Myslenski, Skip (November 26, 1993). "With No One To Lean On This Season, Michigan's Rose Grows Up". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Michigan Ties For Big 10 Lead". Chicago Tribune. March 10, 1994. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  12. ^ "College Basketball; Hard Day for the High and Mighty: Arkansas and Company Take Falls". The New York Times. March 13, 1994. Retrieved May 19, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b Deardorff, Julie (March 25, 1994). "Underdogs Still Running With Pack Maryland, Tulsa Face Heavyweights In Midwest Regional". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  14. ^ "All-Big Ten". Chicago Sun-Times. March 15, 1994. p. 87, sports section. 
  15. ^ Myslenski, Skip (March 18, 1994). "Michigan Needs OT To Escape Pepperdine". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  16. ^ Myslenski, Skip (March 20, 1994). "Howard Keeps Michigan Alive His 34 Points, 18 Rebounds Repel Texas". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  17. ^ Gould, Herb (March 26, 1994). "Big Ten Splits – Michigan Foils Maryland Bid – Arkansas Next". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 104, sports section. 
  18. ^ Deardorff, Julie (March 28, 1994). "Michigan Suffers Shortfall Howard Not Enough, So It's Arkansas". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  19. ^ Myslenski, Skip (April 19, 1994). "Howard, The 'Rock' For Michigan, Enters NBA Draft". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  20. ^ Myslenski, Skip (April 20, 1994). "Michigan's Fav 5 Slips To 2 As Rose Enters NBA Draft". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2010. 
  21. ^ "1994 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved April 25, 2014. 
  22. ^ "1995 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved April 25, 2014. 
  23. ^ "1997 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved April 25, 2014.