1994 Los Angeles Rams season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1994 Los Angeles Rams season
Head coach Chuck Knox
Owner Georgia Frontiere
Home field Anaheim Stadium
Results
Record 4–12
Division place 4th NFC West
Playoff finish did not qualify
Timeline
Previous season Next season
< 1993 1995 >

The 1994 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 57th year with the National Football League and the 49th and final season in Los Angeles.

Personnel[edit]

Staff[edit]

1994 Los Angeles Rams staff
Front Office
  • Owner/President – Georgia Frontiere
  • Executive Vice President – John Shaw
  • Senior Vice President – Jay Zygmunt
  • Administrator of Football Operations – Jack Faulkner
  • Director of Player Personnel – John Becker

Head Coaches

Offensive Coaches

  • Offensive Coordinator/Running Backs – Chick Harris
  • Quarterbacks – Mike Martz
  • Wide Receivers – Steve Moore
  • Tight Ends – Rennie Simmons
  • Offensive Line – Jim Erkenbeck
  • Offensive Assistant – Chuck Knox Jr.
 

Defensive Coaches

  • Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Line – George Dyer
  • Linebackers – Dick Selcer
  • Defensive Backs – Rod Perry
  • Defensive Assistant – Greg Gaines

Special Teams Coaches

  • Special Teams – Wayne Sevier

Strength and Conditioning

  • Strength and Conditioning – Chris Clausen

Regular season[edit]

Schedule[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result TV Time Attendance
1 September 4, 1994 Arizona Cardinals W 14–12 FOX 1:05pt
32,969
2 September 11, 1994 at Atlanta Falcons L 31–13 FOX 10:00pt
55,378
3 September 18, 1994 San Francisco 49ers L 34–19 FOX 1:05pt
56,479
4 September 25, 1994 at Kansas City Chiefs W 16–0 FOX 10:00pt
78,184
5 October 2, 1994 Atlanta Falcons L 8–5 FOX 1:05pt
34,599
6 October 9, 1994 at Green Bay Packers L 24–17 FOX 10:00pt
58,911
7 October 16, 1994 New York Giants W 17–10 FOX 1:05pt
40,474
8 October 23, 1994 at New Orleans Saints L 37–34 FOX 10:00pt
47,908
9 Bye
10 November 6, 1994 Denver Broncos W 27–21 NBC 1:05pt
48,103
11 November 13, 1994 Los Angeles Raiders L 20–17 NBC 1:05pt
65,208
12 November 20, 1994 at San Francisco 49ers L 31–27 ESPN 5:15pt
62,774
13 November 27, 1994 at San Diego Chargers L 31–17 FOX 1:05pt
59,579
14 December 4, 1994 New Orleans Saints L 31–15 FOX 1:05pt
34,960
15 December 11, 1994 at Tampa Bay Buccaneers L 24–14 FOX 10:00pt
34,150
16 December 18, 1994 at Chicago Bears L 27–13 FOX 10:00pt
56,276
17 December 24, 1994 Washington Redskins L 24–21 FOX 1:05pt
25,705

Standings[edit]

NFC West
W L T PCT PF PA STK
(1) San Francisco 49ers 13 3 0 .813 505 296 L1
New Orleans Saints 7 9 0 .438 348 407 W1
Atlanta Falcons 7 9 0 .438 317 385 W1
Los Angeles Rams 4 12 0 .250 286 365 L7

[1]

Regular season[edit]

Week 11[edit]

Week Eleven: Los Angeles Raiders (4–5) at Los Angeles Rams (4–5)
1 2 3 4 Total
Raiders 7 7 0 6 20
Rams 7 0 0 10 17

at Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim, California

Game information
First Quarter
Second Quarter
  • RAI – Raghib Ismail 10 yard pass from Jeff Hostetler (Jeff Jaeger kick) – Raiders 14–7
Fourth Quarter
  • RAI – Jeff Jaeger 44 yard field goal – Raiders 17–7
  • RAM – Tony Zendejas 22 yard field goal – Raiders 17–10
  • RAI – Jeff Jaeger 47 yard field goal – Raiders 20–10
  • RAM – Todd Kinchen 4 yard pass from Chris Miller (Tony Zendejas kick) – Raiders 20–17
Raiders
Rams
  • Chris Chandler
    10/11, 171 Yds, TD
  • Jerome Bettis
    10 Rush, 13 Yds
  • Flipper Anderson
    5 Rec, 105 Yds

The final meeting between the two teams with both franchises in Los Angeles.


Relocation to St. Louis[edit]

Under the terms of the Rams' deal with Anaheim, they were to receive the rights to develop plots of land near the Stadium. When nothing came of these plans, and with attendance falling, Georgia Frontiere got permission to relocate the team. This permission was only granted after the building of the Arrowhead Pond (a multi-use sports arena for hockey and basketball) in close proximity to Anaheim Stadium. The Rams agreed to let the Pond be built within miles of Anaheim Stadium with an 'out clause' to pay the city of Anaheim an amount of money in millions to release them from the lease. After an aborted move to Baltimore, the Rams moved from Los Angeles to St. Louis in late 1994, initially playing at Busch Memorial Stadium until the (TWA) Trans World Dome (now the Edward Jones Dome) was completed. The NFL owners originally rejected the move—until Frontiere agreed to share some of the permanent seat license revenue she was to receive from St. Louis. That same year the then-Los Angeles Raiders were threatening to relocate as well—and did, back to Oakland. As a result, Los Angeles, the second-largest TV market in the country went from having two NFL teams to none, and the NFL has yet to return.

See also[edit]

Other Anaheim–based teams in 1994

*Played Occasional Games in Anaheim

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2010 NFL Record and Fact Book (PDF). National Football League. p. 378. Retrieved July 26, 2011.