1995 in the United Kingdom

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1995 in the United Kingdom
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Events from the year 1995 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • 1 February – new domestic electrical appliances must be supplied with an appropriately fused pre-wired plug.[3]
  • 7 February – Rumbelows, the electrical goods retailer and former sponsors of the Football League Cup, closes its 311 stores with the loss of more than 3,000 jobs.
  • 14 February – Sizewell B nuclear power station, the UK's only commercial pressurised water reactor power station, is first synchronised with the National Grid.
  • 15 February –
    • The manufacturing sector has reported its biggest rise in employment since the Conservative government first came to power sixteen years earlier, although the national unemployment total rose slightly last month, still being in excess 2,500,000 – it has not been below this level since late-1991.
    • The England football team's friendly match against the Republic of Ireland in Dublin is abandoned due to the behavior of a section of English fans, believed to be members of far-right activist groups.
  • 16 February – Neil Kinnock, former leader of the Labour Party, resigns from parliament after twenty-five years to take up a new role as a European Commissioner, sparking a by-election in his Islwyn constituency in South Wales. Labour holds onto the seat with new candidate Don Touhig, who gains nearly 70% of the vote.
  • 17 February – the famous MG sports car brand, not seen on a volume sports car since 1980, is revived when the Rover Group unveils the new MGF sports car which will go on sale this autumn.
  • 21 February – George Graham, who has won six major trophies including two league titles in nearly a decade as manager of Arsenal F.C., is sacked over allegations that he accepted illegal payments from an agent when signing two players in 1992.
  • 24 February – the Football Association bans Eric Cantona from football for eight months, meaning that he will not be able to play competitively until after 30 September.
  • 26 February – Barings Bank, the UK's oldest merchant bank collapses following $1,400,000,000 of losses by rogue trader, Nick Leeson.
  • 28 February – The Diary of Bridget Jones column first published in The Independent.[4]

March[edit]

  • 9 March – the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh visit Northern Ireland for the first time since the IRA and Loyalist ceasefire which came into force last year.[5]
  • 20 March – the Queen arrives in Cape Town for the first royal visit to South Africa in nearly fifty years.
  • 23 March – Eric Cantona is sentenced to fourteen days imprisonment at Croydon Crown Court for his assault on a Crystal Palace fan two months ago. He remains free on bail, pending an appeal against his sentence, but if his appeal is unsuccessful he will be the first footballer to be jailed in Britain for an on-field offence.
  • 31 March – Eric Cantona wins his appeal against his prison sentence, which is reduced to a 120-hour community service order.

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

  • 3 July – the British football transfer record fee is broken for the third time in six months when Liverpool sign striker Stan Collymore from Nottingham Forest for £8,400,000.
  • 4 July – John Major wins the Conservative Party leadership election, gaining 218 votes to John Redwood's 89.[10]
  • 19 July
    • Pensions Act 1995 receives Royal Assent, proposing to phase in a state pension age for women at 65 (equalising it with that for men) over a ten-year period and introducing measures intended to safeguard occupational pension schemes.
    • Unemployment is reported to be on the rise again, though the government denies that it is pointing towards another recession.
  • 23 July – war in Bosnia and Herzegovina: British forces sent to Sarajevo to help relieve the Siege of Sarajevo.[11]
  • 27 July – the Conservative government's majority is slashed further, to nine seats, as the Liberal Democrats win the Littleborough and Saddleworth seat in Lancashire, two months after it was left vacant by the death of Conservative MP Geoffrey Dickens.

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Undated[edit]

Publications[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Full date unknown[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kraar, Louis (May 13, 1996). "Daewoo's Daring Drive Into Europe A Korean Conglomerate And Its Charismatic Boss Are Betting Billions Of Dollars That A Late-Arriving And Little-Known Car Can Succeed In A Crowded Auto Market". Fortune Magazine. 
  2. ^ "Poll tracker". BBC News. 2010. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "Faded Memories". Light Straw. Retrieved 19 January 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0. 
  5. ^ "1995: Queen marks peace in Belfast". BBC News. 9 March 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  6. ^ Piercy, Nigel. "Daewoo Cars Case". Scribd. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  7. ^ "1995: First man jailed for male rape". BBC News. 9 June 1995. Archived from the original on 7 January 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  8. ^ "First woman chief constable is appointed". The Independent. 1995-06-15. Retrieved 2015-05-30. 
  9. ^ "Voting Intention in Great Britain: 1976–present". Ipsos MORI. 21 June 2010. Archived from the original on 21 February 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "1995: Major wins Conservative leadership". BBC News. 4 July 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  11. ^ "1995: British forces sent to Sarajevo". BBC News. 23 July 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  12. ^ Hardy, Adam (November 1995). "Spirit of suburbia". Perspectives on Architecture. 2 (19): 42–47. 
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ "How the Government's Majority Disappeared". politics97. BBC News. 1997. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  15. ^ Lyall, Sarah (12 November 1995). "Is it art or is it just dead meat?". New York Times. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  16. ^ Smith, Roberta (23 November 1995). "Some British moderns seeking to shock". New York Times. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  17. ^ "1995: Queen mum hip op 'successful'". BBC News. 16 November 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  18. ^ Gilliland, Ben (16 January 2009). "Science & Discovery". Metro. 
  19. ^ "1995: Diana admits adultery in TV interview". BBC News. 20 November 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  20. ^ "Top 10 Programmes – 1995". BARB. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  21. ^ "GoldenEye (1995)". MI6. Retrieved 19 January 2011. 
  22. ^ "1995: Clinton kindles hope in Northern Ireland". BBC News. 30 November 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  23. ^ "1995: Rogue trader jailed for six years". BBC News. 2 December 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  24. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1995". Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  25. ^ "1995: 'Divorce': Queen to Charles and Diana". BBC News. 20 December 1995. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  26. ^ "British Election Panel Study, 1992–97". Centre for Research into Elections and Social Trends. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  27. ^ Hadley Center Ranked EWP.
  28. ^ Hadley ranked Central England temperature
  29. ^ Courts and Legal Services Act 1990 (section 58).

External links[edit]