1999 OJ4

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1999 OJ4
Orbit of 1999 OJ4.gif
Orbit of 1999 OJ4
Discovery
Discovered by Mauna Kea Observatory
Discovery date July 18, 1999
Orbital characteristics[1][2][3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 3363 days (9.21 yr)
Aphelion 38.8091477 AU (5.80576586 Tm)
Perihelion 36.9475497 AU (5.52727476 Tm)
37.8783487 AU (5.66652031 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.024573378
233.13 yr (85150.1 d)
274.652461°
0° 0m 15.22s /day
Inclination 4.00493625°
127.539040°
300.759535°
Known satellites 1
Earth MOID 35.9627 AU (5.37994 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.8742 AU (4.76831 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 75 km (47 mi)
0.21 (geometric)[1][4]
Temperature 43 K (-230°C)
7.1[2]

1999 OJ4 is a fairly small cubewano that orbits in a nearly circular orbit. It is orbited by S/2005 (1999 OJ4) 1, a moon just 3 kilometres smaller than 1999 OJ4 itself.[1]

Orbit and Relationship with the Kuiper Belt[edit]

1999 OJ4 orbit characterizes it as a classical Kuiper Belt object, or cubewano. Due to its nearly circular orbit and low inclination, it is also in the "cold" population of cubewanos. As a result, it is likely reddish in color.[5][6]

Moon[edit]

1999 OJ4 has one moon, S/2005 (1999 OJ4) 1. This moon was discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope[4] on October 5, 2013.[1] It orbits 3,267 kilometres away from 1999 OJ4, completing one orbit every 84.115 days.[1][4] At 72 km, it is nearly the same size as 1999 OJ4. From the surface of 1999 OJ4, S/2005 (1999 OJ4) 1 would have an apparent diameter of roughly 8.11°,[a] over fourteen times the apparent size of the Sun from Earth.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Calculated by solving .

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Johnston, W. R. (28 December 2008). "1999 OJ4". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  2. ^ a b "(1999 OJ4) orbit diagram". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 3031899. Retrieved 29 March 2016. 
  3. ^ "1999 OJ4". Lowell. 26 March 2013. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  4. ^ a b c Grundy, W. M.; et al. (2009). "Mutual Orbits and Masses of Six Transneptunian Binaries". Icarus. arXiv:0812.3126free to read. Bibcode:2009Icar..200..627G. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2008.12.008. 
  5. ^ A. Doressoundiram; N. Peixinho; C. de Bergh; S. Fornasier; P. Thebault; M. A. Barucci; et al. (October 2002). "The Color Distribution in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt". The Astronomical Journal. 124 (4): 2279. arXiv:astro-ph/0206468free to read. Bibcode:2002AJ....124.2279D. doi:10.1086/342447. 
  6. ^ Nuno Peixinho; Pedro Lacerda & David Jewitt (August 2008). "Color-inclination relation of the classical Kuiper belt objects". The Astronomical Journal. 136 (5): 1837. arXiv:0808.3025free to read. Bibcode:2008AJ....136.1837P. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/136/5/1837. 

External links[edit]