1999 Rugby League Tri-Nations

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1999 (1999) Tri-Nations  ()
Number of teams 3
Winner  Australia (1st title)

Matches played 4
Attendance 70,295 (17,574 per match)
Tries scored 26 (6.5 per match)
Top scorer Australia Mat Rogers[1] (36)
Top try scorer New Zealand Nigel Vagana[1] (4)
2004

The 1999 Rugby League Tri-Nations series was contested by Australia, Great Britain and New Zealand in 1999. It was the first multi-national rugby league tournament to feature the sport's three world powers since the 1989-92 World Cup (the 1995 World Cup featured England and Wales separately). Co-hosts Australia and New Zealand played in the final, which was narrowly won by the Kangaroos. Great Britain didn't win a game of the tournament.

After the Lions narrowly defeated the Queensland Cup premiers, Burleigh Bears, a poor crowd attended their match against Australia at Suncorp Stadium. Fearing a similar attendance for the series final, the tournament organisers relocated the match to Ericsson Stadium.

With the Rugby League World Cup to be staged the following year, and tours of Great Britain by Australia in 2001 and 2003 and New Zealand in 2002, the Tri-nations was not held again until 2004.

Venues[edit]

The games were played at the following venues in Australia and New Zealand. The tournament final was played in Auckland.

Auckland Brisbane
Mount Smart Stadium Suncorp Stadium
Capacity: 30,000 Capacity: 52,500
EricssonStadium00.jpg Suncorp Stadium.jpg

Results[edit]

Tournament matches[edit]

15 October
New Zealand  24 – 22  Australia
Tries:
Stephen Kearney
Jason Lowrie
Willie Talau
Nigel Vagana
Goals:
Henry Paul 4/4
Tries:
Brad Fittler (2)
Matt Gidley
Russell Richardson
Mat Rogers
Goals:
Mat Rogers 3/4
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 22,540[1]
Referee: Russel Smith England


NEW ZEALAND
1. Richie Barnett (c) · 2. Nigel Vagana · 3. Ruben Wiki · 4. Willie Talau · 5. Lesley Vainikolo · 6. Robbie Paul · 7. Stacey Jones · 8. Craig Smith · 9. Henry Paul · 10. Joe Vagana · 11. Matt Rua · 12. Stephen Kearney · 13. Logan Swann
Interchange: 14. David Kidwell · 15. Jason Lowrie · 16. Nathan Cayless · 17. Richard Swain
Coach: Frank Endacott

AUSTRALIA
1. Robbie Ross · 2. Mat Rogers · 3. Matt Gidley · 4. Russell Richardson · 5. Wendell Sailor · 6. Brad Fittler (c) · 7. Brett Kimmorley · 8. Darren Britt · 9. Craig Gower · 10. Rodney Howe · 11. Bryan Fletcher · 12. Nik Kosef · 13. Jason Smith
Interchange: 14. Darren Lockyer · 15. Darren Smith · 16. Jason Stevens · 17. Michael Vella
Coach: Chris Anderson


22 October
Australia  42 – 6  Great Britain
Tries:
Darren Lockyer (2)
Brad Fittler
Matt Gidley
Brett Kimmorley
Wendell Sailor
Jason Smith
Goals:
Mat Rogers 6/6
Ryan Girdler 1/2
Tries:
Iestyn Harris
Goals:
Andy Farrell 1/1
Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane
Attendance: 12,511[1]
Referee: David Pakieto New Zealand


AUSTRALIA
1. Darren Lockyer · 2. Mat Rogers · 3. Shaun Timmins · 4. Matt Gidley · 5. Wendell Sailor · 6. Matthew Johns · 7. Brett Kimmorley · 8. Darren Britt · 9. Craig Gower · 10. Rodney Howe · 11. Bryan Fletcher · 12. Nik Kosef · 13. Brad Fittler (c)
Interchange: 14. Ryan Girdler · 15. Darren Smith · 16. Jason Smith · 17. Michael Vella
Coach: Chris Anderson

GREAT BRITAIN
1. Kris Radlinski · 2. Jason Robinson · 3. Gary Connolly · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Anthony Sullivan · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Ryan Sheridan · 8. Dale Laughton · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Barrie McDermott · 11. Denis Betts · 12. Adrian Morley · 13. Andy Farrell (c)
Interchange: 14. Sean Long · 15. Paul Anderson · 16. Paul Sculthorpe · 17. Andy Hay
Coach: Andy Goodway


29 October
New Zealand  26 – 4  Great Britain
Tries:
Nigel Vagana (2)
Matt Rua
Joe Vagana
Goals:
Henry Paul 5/5
Tries:
Sean Long
Goals:
Andy Farrell 0/1
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 14,040[1]
Referee: Tim Mander Australia


NEW ZEALAND
1. Richie Barnett (c) · 2. Nigel Vagana · 3. Ruben Wiki · 4. Willie Talau · 5. Lesley Vainikolo · 6. Henry Paul · 7. Robbie Paul · 8. Joe Vagana · 9. Richard Swain · 10. Craig Smith · 11. Matt Rua · 12. Stephen Kearney · 13. Logan Swann
Interchange: 14. Gene Ngamu · 15. Jason Lowrie · 16. Nathan Cayless · 17. David Kidwell
Coach: Frank Endacott

GREAT BRITAIN
1. Kris Radlinski · 2. Jason Robinson · 3. Gary Connolly · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Francis Cummins · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Ryan Sheridan · 8. Dale Laughton · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Barrie McDermott · 11. Adrian Morley · 12. Chris Joynt · 13. Andy Farrell (c)
Interchange: 14. Sean Long · 15. Denis Betts · 16. Mike Forshaw · 17. Andy Hay
Coach: Andy Goodway

Tournament standings[edit]

Team Played Won Drew Lost For Against Difference Points
 New Zealand 2 2 0 0 50 26 +24 4
 Australia 2 1 0 1 64 30 +34 2
 Great Britain 2 0 0 2 10 68 −58 0

Final[edit]

5 November
New Zealand  20 – 22  Australia
Tries:
Robbie Paul
Nigel Vagana

Goals:
Henry Paul (6/7)
Tries:
Mat Rogers (2)
Matthew Johns
Wendell Sailor
Goals:
Mat Rogers (3/5)
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 21,204[1]
Referee/s: R Smith England
New Zealand Position Australia
Richie Barnett (c) FB Darren Lockyer
Nigel Vagana WG Mat Rogers
Ruben Wiki CE Darren Smith
Willie Talau CE Matt Gidley
Leslie Vainikolo WG Wendell Sailor
Henry Paul FE Matthew Johns
Robbie Paul HB Brett Kimmorley
Joe Vagana PR Jason Stevens
Richard Swain HK Craig Gower
Craig Smith PR Darren Britt
Stephen Kearney SR Bryan Fletcher
Matt Rua SR Nik Kosef
Logan Swann LF Brad Fittler (c)
Gene Ngamu Int. Jason Smith
Jason Lowrie Int. Ryan Girdler
Nathan Cayless Int. Michael Vella
David Kidwell Int. Shaun Timmins
Frank Endacott Coach Chris Anderson

Non-series Test[edit]

During the series, New Zealand also played a Test against Tonga. This was the last test match to be held at Auckland's Carlaw Park.

27 October
New Zealand  74 – 0  Tonga
Carlaw Park, Auckland
Attendance: 4,528

Non-series Match[edit]

As a curtain raiser to the final, New Zealand Māori played Great Britain.[2]

1 November
 Māori 12 – 22  Great Britain
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 21,204[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Tri-Nations 1999". Rugby League Project. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  2. ^ Coffey and Wood The Kiwis: 100 Years of International Rugby League ISBN 1-86971-090-8