19th century in LGBT rights

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Events[edit]

1800s[edit]

1802[edit]

1807[edit]

  • One of the first known same-sex couples in American history, Vermont residents Charity Bryant and Sylvia Drake, begin their relationship.[1] This couple is most strongly documented in historian Rachel Hope Cleves' 2014 book Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America.[1]
  • The Duchy of Warsaw is created, re-legalizing same-sex sexual intercourse.[2]

1809[edit]

1810s[edit]

1811[edit]

1812[edit]

1813[edit]

1815[edit]

1820s[edit]

1824[edit]

  • October 28 — The Marquis de Custine is beaten and left for dead after propositioning a male soldier in Saint-Denis. The scandal forces him out of the closet, but he recovers and lives the rest of his life as an open 'sodomite' with his partner Edward St. Barbe. Custine maintains a successful social life in Paris.[5]

1830s[edit]

1830[edit]

  • The new criminal code of the Empire of Brazil excludes the crime of sodomy, officially decriminalizing homosexualism.

1832[edit]

  • The Russian Empire criminalizes muzhelozhstvo, which courts interpret to mean anal sex between men, under Article 995 of the criminal code. Men convicted were stripped of their legal rights and sent to Siberia for four to five years.[6]

1840s[edit]

1840[edit]

  • Hannover abolishes laws criminalizing homosexual conduct between consenting adults.[4]

1860s[edit]

1861[edit]

  • The United Kingdom abolishes the death penalty for buggery, replacing it with a sentence of life imprisonment. Attempted buggery carries a ten-year sentence.[7]

1869[edit]

A German pamphlet by the Austrian-born novelist Karl-Maria Kertbeny, published anonymously,[8] arguing against a Prussian anti-sodomy law contains the first known use of the word "homosexual" in print.[9]

1870s[edit]

1871[edit]

1880s[edit]

1885[edit]

  • In the United Kingdom, the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885, whose Labouchere Amendment (Clause 11) outlaws oral sex between men—but not women—is given Royal Assent by Queen Victoria. A popular legend claims that Victoria struck references to lesbianism from the Act because of her refusal to believe that women "did such things"; in reality, they had simply never been mentioned in the Act. Clause 11 reads:

Any male person who, in public or private, commits, or is a party to the commission of, or procures or attempts to procure the commission by any male person of, any act of gross indecency with another male person, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and being convicted thereof shall be liable at the discretion of the court to be imprisoned for any term not exceeding two years, with or without hard labour.

Buggery, or anal sex between men, was already illegal.

1886[edit]

We'wha, a lhamana of the Zuni tribe, begins a six-month stay in Washington, D. C., during which time he calls upon President Grover Cleveland.[10]

1890s[edit]

1897[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The improbable, 200-year-old story of one of America’s first same-sex ‘marriages’". Washington Post, March 20, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Warsaw
  3. ^ Miller, p. 222
  4. ^ a b c Miller, p. 112
  5. ^ Muhlstein, Anka. Trans. Teresa Waugh. (1996) A Taste for Freedom: The Life of Astolphe de Custine. Helen Marx Books.
  6. ^ Miller, p. 201
  7. ^ Miller, p. 280
  8. ^ "Kertbeny Coins "Homosexual"", GayHistory.com, retrieved 2007-09-07 
  9. ^ Feray, Jean-Claude; Herzer, Manfred (1990). "Homosexual Studies and Politics in the 19th Century: Karl Maria Kertbeny". Journal of Homosexuality, Vol. 19, No. 1.
  10. ^ Miller, p. 29

References[edit]

  • Miller, Neil (1995). Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present. New York, Vintage Books. ISBN 0-09-957691-0.