1st Canadian Comedy Awards

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1st Canadian Comedy Awards
Date6 April 2000 (2000-04-06)
Location
CountryCanada
Presented byCanadian Comedy Foundation for Excellence
Hosted byDave Thomas
Most awardsThis Hour Has 22 Minutes (4)
Most nominationsThe Drowsy Chaperone and Made in Canada (6)
Websitewww.canadiancomedyawards.org
Television/radio coverage
NetworkThe Comedy Network

The 1st Canadian Comedy Awards honoured the best Canadian comedy of 1999 in live performances, television and film. The awards ceremony was presented by the Canadian Comedy Foundation for Excellence (CCFE), and was held on 6 April 2000 at the Masonic Temple in Toronto, Ontario.[1][2] The ceremony was hosted by Dave Thomas. A one-hour version of the ceremony was broadcast late the following night on CTV, and the full program aired on The Comedy Network on 9 April at 9 pm.[3]

Canadian Comedy Awards, also known as Beavers,[4] were awarded in 23 categories. Winners were selected by members of ACTRA (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists), the Canadian Actors' Equity Association, the Writers Guild of Canada, and the Directors Guild of Canada.[1] It was one of the first award presentations to use online voting.[5][6] The ceremony also marked the creation of the Canadian Comedy Hall of Fame and the induction of its first honourees.[1]

The Drowsy Chaperone and the CBC comedy Made in Canada led the way with six nominations each, followed by Double Exposure, Last Night, and This Hour Has 22 Minutes with five. The big winners were This Hour Has 22 Minutes which won four awards in television, The Drowsy Chaperone which took three awards in live comedy, and Mike Myers who won three in film. Don McKellar won two awards across disciplines: best film director for Last Night and best playwright (together with colleagues Bob Martin, Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison) for The Drowsy Chaperone.[1]

Ceremony[edit]

A serving of poutine

The inaugural Canadian Comedy Awards ceremony was held on 6 April 2000 in Toronto, Ontario. The venue was the historic Masonic Temple, home of CTV-affiliate The Comedy Network.[3] The ceremony was hosted by Dave Thomas, a comedic veteran of more than 20 films and 300 sitcom episodes. Thomas is best known for the character Doug McKenzie, a parody of all things Canadian, and the ceremony played on similar humour by serving guests back bacon on a bun and poutine.[1]

Awards[edit]

The Beaver was awarded in twenty-three categories recognizing work in live performances, film and television. Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface:[7]

Live[edit]

Best Stand-up Best Stand-up Newcomer
  • Blue ribbon Wade McElwain
  • Frank Spadone
  • Gavin Stephens
  • Jason Rouse
  • Terry McGurrin
Best Male Improviser Best Female Improviser
Best Live Performance – Male Best Live Performance – Female
Best Sketch Troupe or Company Best New Sketch Troupe
  • Blue ribbon Skippy's Rangers
  • Die Nasty
  • Pamplemousse
  • The Bobroom
  • The Devil's Advocates
  • Blue ribbon Lolas
  • Closet Primadonnas
  • Dirty Little Secret
  • Goatee Boys
  • Kevlor-2000
  • Rebecca
Best Direction in a New Play Best Direction in an Existing Play
Best Playwriting in a Comedic Play

Television[edit]

Best Performance by a Male Best Performance by a Female
Best Direction in a Series Best Direction in a Special or Episode
Best Writing in a Series Best Writing in a Special or Episode

Film[edit]

Best Performance by a Male Best Performance by a Female
Best Direction Best Original Screenplay
Best Writing Best Writing – Adapted

Special Awards[edit]

Hall of Fame PAL Award
  • Blue ribbon Happy Gang

Multiple wins[edit]

The following people, shows, films, etc. received multiple awards in the inaugural ceremony:

Awards Person or work
4 This Hour Has 22 Minutes
3 The Drowsy Chaperone
Mike Myers
2 Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me
Don McKellar
Made in Canada

Multiple nominations[edit]

The following people, shows, films, etc. received multiple nominations.

Awards Person or work
6 The Drowsy Chaperone
Made in Canada
4 Don McKellar
Double Exposure
Last Night
This Hour Has 22 Minutes
3 Dog Park
History Bites
Mike Myers
Moving Day
Sean Cullen
2 Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me
Bloor Witch Project
Bruce McCulloch
Chris Deacon
Chris Earle
Comedy Now!
Comics!
Jessica Holmes
Karen Hines
Liam Kiernan
A Little Off the Top
Nick Orchard
Shoshana Sperling
The Wrong Guy

Broadcast[edit]

The awards ceremony was held in Toronto's Masonic Temple, which CTV Television Network had equipped as a television studio in the late 1990s. The ceremony was recorded for television, produced by Higher Ground Productions and directed by Bob Sorger. A one-hour version of the ceremony was broadcast on CTV at midnight on the night of Friday 7 April 2000, with the full program airing on The Comedy Network on 9 April at 9 pm.[3] The special was well-received by the members of the industry it represents, who awarded Sorger the Beaver for best direction of a TV special or episode in 2001.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Niester, Alan (7 April 2000). "A night for the Groucho glasses". The Globe and Mail. Toronto: The Globe and Mail Inc. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Canada a country of comedians as 100 nominations announced". The Globe and Mail. Toronto: The Globe and Mail Inc. 8 March 2000. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 9 June 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Walsh, Mercer are comic royalty". The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ontario: The Globe and Mail Inc. 7 April 2000. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  4. ^ Spevack, Leatrice (6 April 2002). "The Beaver goes to ... a pretty funny show". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Canadian Comedy Awards Festival returns to Ottawa". Ottawa Citizen. 7 March 2014. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  6. ^ Demara, Bruce (12 October 2011). "Awards honour cold but funny Canucks". The Toronto Star. Toronto: Toronto Star Newspapers Limited. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Nominations & Awards Archives". Canadian Comedy Awards. 2000. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Pretty funny awards". The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ontario: The Globe and Mail Inc. 12 April 2001. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.

External links[edit]