2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine

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2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine
2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine
Ball-and-stick model of the 2,4,6-tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine molecule
Names
IUPAC name
2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
C6N12O18
Molar mass 528.13 g·mol−1
Density 1.91 g/cm3
Melting point 91 to 92 °C (196 to 198 °F; 364 to 365 K)
Related compounds
Related compounds
4,4’-Dinitro-3,3’-diazenofuroxan
Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane
Heptanitrocubane
Octanitrocubane
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine is a chemical compound that is a derivative of triazine first prepared in 1995.[1] It is synthesized by destructive nitration of 2,4,6-tricarboxyl-1,3,5-triazine. It is noteworthy for having more nitro groups than it does carbon atoms, so could be used as an oxygen source, or added to oxygen-poor explosives to increase their power.

Derivatives have been prepared by nucleophilic displacement of the nitro groups with azide and hydrazine.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shastin, Alexey V.; Godovikova, Tamara I.; Golova, Svetlana P.; Kuz'Min, Vladimir S.; Khmel'Nitskii, Lenor I.; Korsunskii, Boris L. (1995). "Synthesis of 2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine". Mendeleev Communications. 5: 17. doi:10.1070/MC1995v005n01ABEH000440. 
  2. ^ Shastin, A. V. (2003). "Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of 2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine. 3. Reaction of 2,4,6-Tris(trinitromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine with Azides and Hydrazine". Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds. 39 (3): 354. doi:10.1023/A:1023970928207.