2,6-Dichloroaniline

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2,6-Dichloroaniline
2,6-Dichloranilin.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2,6-Dichloroaniline
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.009.237 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 210-160-5
UNII
UN number 1590
  • InChI=1S/C6H5Cl2N/c7-4-2-1-3-5(8)6(4)9/h1-3H,9H2
    Key: JDMFXJULNGEPOI-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1=CC(=C(C(=C1)Cl)N)Cl
Properties
C6H5Cl2N
Molar mass 162.01 g·mol−1
Appearance white solid
Melting point 39 °C (102 °F; 312 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS06: ToxicGHS07: Exclamation markGHS08: Health hazardGHS09: Environmental hazard
Danger
H301, H311, H317, H331, H373, H410
P260, P261, P264, P270, P271, P272, P273, P280, P301+P310, P302+P352, P304+P340, P311, P312, P314, P321, P322, P330, P333+P313, P361, P363, P391, P403+P233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

2,6-Dichloroaniline is an organic compound with the formula C6H3Cl2(NH2). It is one of several isomers of dichloroaniline. It is a colorless or white solid. Derivatives include the drugs clonidine and diclofenac.

Preparation[edit]

It is produced by hydrogenation of 2,6-dichloronitrobenzene.[1]

In the laboratory, it can be prepared by halogenation of sulfanilamide followed by desulfonation.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ P. F. Vogt; J. J. Gerulis (2005). "Amines, Aromatic". Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a02_037.
  2. ^ Margaret K. Seikel (1944). "2,6-Dichloroaniline and 2,6-Dibromoaniline". Org. Synth. 24: 47. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.024.0047.