2-6-8-0

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GN #1951 at Skykomish, Washington in 1924.

A 2-6-8-0 steam locomotive, in the Whyte notation for describing locomotive wheel arrangements, has two leading wheels, a set of six driving wheels, a set of eight driving wheels, and no trailing wheels. These locomotives usually employ the Mallet principle of articulation, with a swinging front engine and a rigidly attached rear engine.

Equivalent classifications[edit]

Other equivalent classifications are:
UIC classification: 1CD (also known as German classification and Italian classification)
French classification: 130+040
Turkish classification: 34+44
Swiss classification: 3/4+4/4

The UIC classification is refined to (1'C)D for Mallet locomotives.

Examples[edit]

This type of articulated locomotive is unusual in having different numbers of driving axles in each set. The Great Northern Railway and the Alabama Great Southern a predecessor of the Southern Railway, both in the United States, were the sole users of this type of locomotive. Great Northern received 35, numbered 1950–1984, designated class M-1, from Baldwin in 1910. In 1926 and 1927 the M1s were rebuilt to use simple expansion and were redesignated class M-2. Most of the M-2s did not last long, being converted to class O-7 2-8-2s between 1929 and 1931; the thirteen exceptions were not retired until 1949–1954.[1] The AGS had a single example in this classification, number 300.

This unusual wheel arrangement was the subject of some experimentation. The Erie Railroad briefly had a locomotive of this type numbered 2900, but it was rebuilt to a 2-8-0 in 1916 after only six years. The Baldwin Locomotive Works marketed a front end "kit" whereby conventional 2-8-0 locomotives could be converted to 2-6-8-0 types.

During World War II, Deutsche Reichsbahn started work on a condensing 2-6-8-0, but it was never completed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keyes,, Norman C.; Middleton, Kenneth R. (Autumn 1980). "The Great Northern Railway Company: All-Time Locomotive Roster, 1861–1970". Railroad History. The Railway & Locomotive Historical Society, Inc. (143): 95–96. 

External links[edit]