2-Aminopyridine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2-Aminopyridine
2-aminopyridine.svg
Names
IUPAC name
Pyridin-2-amine
Other names
2-Pyridinamine; 2-Pyridylamine; α-Aminopyridine; α-Pyridylamine[1]
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.263
Properties
C5H6N2
Molar mass 94.12 g·mol−1
Appearance colourless solid
Melting point 59 to 60 °C (138 to 140 °F; 332 to 333 K)
Boiling point 210 °C (410 °F; 483 K)
>100%[1]
Hazards
Flash point 68 °C; 154 °F; 341 K
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
200 mg/kg (rat, oral)
50 mg/kg (mouse, oral)[2]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 0.5 ppm (2 mg/m3)[1]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 0.5 ppm (2 mg/m3)[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
5 ppm[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

2-Aminopyridine is an organic compound with the formula H2NC5H4N. It is one of three isomeric aminopyridines. It is a colourless solid that is used in the production of the drugs piroxicam, sulfapyridine, tenoxicam, and tripelennamine. It is produced by the reaction of sodium amide with pyridine, the Chichibabin reaction.[3]

Structure[edit]

Although 2-hydroxypyridine exists in significant amounts as the pyridone tautomer, the related imine tautomer (HNC5H4NH) is less important for 2-aminopyridine.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0026". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  2. ^ "2-Aminopyridine". Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  3. ^ Shinkichi Shimizu, Nanao Watanabe, Toshiaki Kataoka, Takayuki Shoji, Nobuyuki Abe, Sinji Morishita, Hisao Ichimura "Pyridine and Pyridine Derivatives" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2000, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a22_399

External links[edit]