2-Ethyl-1-butanol

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2-Ethyl-1-butanol[1]
Skeletal formula of 2-ethyl-1-butanol with some implicit hydrogens shown
3D ball-and-stick structure of 2-ethyl-1-butanol
Names
IUPAC name
2-Ethylbutan-1-ol[2]
Identifiers
97-95-0 N
1731254
ChemSpider 7080 YesY
EC Number 202-621-4
Jmol 3D model Interactive image
PubChem 7358
RTECS number EL3850000
UNII 28002VFS3H YesY
UN number 2275
Properties
C6H14O
Molar mass 102.18 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Density 830 mg mL−1
Melting point −114.40 °C; −173.92 °F; 158.75 K
Boiling point 145 to 151 °C; 293 to 304 °F; 418 to 424 K
10 g L−1
Vapor pressure 206 Pa
1.422
Thermochemistry
246.65 J K−1 mol−1
Hazards
GHS pictograms The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word WARNING
H302, H312
P280
Harmful Xn
R-phrases R21/22
S-phrases (S2), S36
Flash point 58 °C (136 °F; 331 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
1.85 g kg−1 (oral, rat)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

2-Ethyl-1-butanol (IUPAC name) is an organic chemical compound. It can be used to facilitate the separation of ethanol from water, which form an azeotrope that otherwise limits the maximum ethanol concentration.[3]

Reactions[edit]

2-Ethyl-1-butanol is manufactured industrially by the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 3–262, 8–106, 15–20, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  2. ^ "2-ethyl-1-butanol - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 26 March 2005. Identification and Related Records. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 
  3. ^ Roddy, James W. (1981). "Distribution of ethanol-water mixtures to organic liquids". Ind. Eng. Chem. Proc. Des. Dev. (American Chemical Society) 20 (1): 104–108. doi:10.1021/i200012a016. 
  4. ^ McKetta, John J.; Cunningham, William Aaron (1994), Encyclopedia of Chemical Processing and Design 47, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, p. 117, ISBN 978-0-8247-2451-1, retrieved 2010-01-25