2-Methyltetrahydroquinoline

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2-Methyltetrahydroquinoline
2-Methyltetrahydroquinoline.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-Methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline
Other names
Tetrahydroquinaldine, 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinaldine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
EC Number
  • 217-226-2
UNII
  • racemic (R/S): InChI=1S/C10H13N/c1-8-6-7-9-4-2-3-5-10(9)11-8/h2-5,8,11H,6-7H2,1H3/t8-/m1/s1
    Key: JZICUKPOZUKZLL-MRVPVSSYSA-N
  • (R): InChI=1S/C10H13N/c1-8-6-7-9-4-2-3-5-10(9)11-8/h2-5,8,11H,6-7H2,1H3/t8-/m0/s1
    Key: JZICUKPOZUKZLL-QMMMGPOBSA-N
  • CC1CCC2=CC=CC=C2N1
  • (R): C[C@@H]1CCC2=CC=CC=C2N1
  • (S): C[C@H]1CCC2=CC=CC=C2N1
Properties
C10H13N
Molar mass 147.221 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless oil
Boiling point 125 °C (257 °F; 398 K) (17 Torr)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation mark
Warning
H315, H319
P264, P280, P302+P352, P305+P351+P338, P321, P332+P313, P337+P313, P362
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

2-Methyltetrahydroquinoline is one of the methyl-substituted derivatives of tetrahydroquinoline. A colorless oil, it is a chiral compound owing to the presence of the methyl substituent. It is produced by the hydrogenation of quinaldine.[1] It is of interest in medicinal chemistry.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chakraborty, Sumit; Brennessel, William W.; Jones, William D. (2014). "A Molecular Iron Catalyst for the Acceptorless Dehydrogenation and Hydrogenation of N-Heterocycles". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 136 (24): 8564–8567. doi:10.1021/ja504523b. PMID 24877556.
  2. ^ Sridharan, Vellaisamy; Suryavanshi, Padmakar A.; Menéndez, J. Carlos (2011). "Advances in the Chemistry of Tetrahydroquinolines". Chemical Reviews. 111 (11): 7157–7259. doi:10.1021/cr100307m. PMID 21830756.