2-Chlorophenol

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2-Chlorophenol[1][2][3][4]
2-Chlorophenol
2-Chlorophenol
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-Chlorophenol
Other names
o-Chlorophenol (no longer recommended[5])
2-Hydroxychlorobenzene
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
DrugBank
ECHA InfoCard 100.002.213
KEGG
Properties
C6H5ClO
Molar mass 128.56 g/mol
Appearance Light amber, liquid
Density 1.2634 g/cm3 at 20 °C
Melting point 9.4 °C (48.9 °F; 282.5 K)
Boiling point 174.9 °C (346.8 °F; 448.0 K)
20 g/L at 20 °C
Solubility soluble in ethanol, diethyl ether, benzene
Vapor pressure 0.308 kPa
Acidity (pKa) 8.56
-77.4·10−6 cm3/mol
Thermochemistry
1.468 J·g−1·K−1
Hazards
Main hazards Corrosive - causes burns
Safety data sheet MSDS
Flash point 64 °C (147 °F; 337 K)
550 °C (1,022 °F; 823 K)
Related compounds
benzene
phenol
chlorobenzene
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

2-Chlorophenol or ortho-chlorophenol is an organic compound, a derivative of phenol. Related compounds are used as a disinfectant agents and various pesticides. This particular compound has few other applications, but is an intermediate in the polychlorination of phenol.[6] 2-chlorophenol is a colorless to amber liquid with an unpleasant, penetrating (carbolic) odor. It sinks in water and slowly dissolves.[7] The compound is known to be soluble in ethanol, ether, benzene, and caustic alkali solutions.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 3–120, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  2. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, p. 1281, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  3. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 8–103, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  4. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 15–18, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  5. ^ Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 690. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4. Only one name is retained, phenol, for C6H5-OH, both as a preferred name and for general nomenclature. The structure is substitutable at any position. Locants 2, 3, and 4 are recommended, not o, m, and p. 
  6. ^ Fiege, H.; Voges, H.-M.; Hamamoto, T; Umemura, S.; Iwata, T.; Miki, H.; Fujita, Y.; Buysch, H.-J.; Garbe, D.; Paulus, W. (2000), "Phenol Derivatives", Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH, doi:10.1002/14356007.a19_313 
  7. ^ http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/2-chlorophenol#section=Top
  8. ^ Lide, D.R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 86TH Edition 2005-2006. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, FL 2005, p. 3-110

External links[edit]