2000–01 Liverpool F.C. season

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Liverpool
2000–01 season
ChairmanDavid Moores
ManagerGérard Houllier
Premier League3rd
FA CupWinners
League CupWinners
UEFA CupWinners
Top goalscorerLeague:
Michael Owen (16)

All:
Michael Owen (24)
Average home league attendance42,768

The 2000–01 season was Liverpool's 109th season of football since they were established. This season proved highly successful for Liverpool, with them picking up the League Cup, UEFA Cup and FA Cup under Gerard Houllier, having finished 3rd in the league.[1]

Season summary[edit]

Liverpool enjoyed their best season for years when they completed a unique treble of cup competitions and ended Gérard Houllier's three-year wait to bring silverware to Anfield.

The first trophy was secured on 25 February when a 5–4 penalty shoot-out victory followed a 1–1 draw with Birmingham City in the Worthington Cup final. The game was also the first club fixture to be played at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium while Wembley was being rebuilt. Part two of the treble was completed on 12 May when two late Michael Owen goals overturned Arsenal's lead in the FA Cup Final to give the Reds a 2–1 win. The final part of the treble was perhaps the most dramatic. The UEFA Cup final featured an amazing nine goals as Alavés gave them a run for their money fighting back to equalize from 3–1 and 4–3, before Liverpool finally ran out 5–4 winners after extra-time.[2] The FA and UEFA cup wins meant Liverpool played in the Charity Shield and UEFA Super Cup at the start of the next season, winning both.

Promising young midfielder Steven Gerrard was voted PFA Young Player of the Year for his key part in one of the most successful season's in Liverpool's 109-year history, and contributions from British stars Michael Owen, Robbie Fowler, Jamie Carragher, Danny Murphy and new signings Gary McAllister and Emile Heskey were matched by an increasingly continental side consisting of new captain Sami Hyypiä, Sander Westerveld, Jari Litmanen and Dietmar Hamann.

However, there was sad news just after the end of the season, when former manager Joe Fagan (manager of the 1984 side that also managed to win three trophies in a season) died at the age of 80 after a long illness.

Players[edit]

First-team squad[edit]

Squad at end of season

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK Netherlands NED Sander Westerveld
2 DF Switzerland  SUI Stéphane Henchoz
3 DF Germany GER Christian Ziege
6 DF Germany GER Markus Babbel
7 MF Czech Republic CZE Vladimír Šmicer
8 FW England ENG Emile Heskey
9 FW England ENG Robbie Fowler (vice-captain)
10 FW England ENG Michael Owen
11 MF England ENG Jamie Redknapp (captain)
12 DF Finland FIN Sami Hyypiä (2nd vice-captain)
13 MF England ENG Danny Murphy
14 DF Norway NOR Vegard Heggem
15 MF Czech Republic CZE Patrik Berger
16 MF Germany GER Dietmar Hamann
17 MF England ENG Steven Gerrard
No. Pos. Nation Player
19 GK Guadeloupe GLP Pegguy Arphexad
20 MF England ENG Nick Barmby
21 MF Scotland SCO Gary McAllister
23 DF England ENG Jamie Carragher
24 MF France FRA Bernard Diomède
25 MF Croatia CRO Igor Bišćan
26 GK Denmark DEN Jørgen Nielsen
27 DF France FRA Grégory Vignal
28 MF Republic of Ireland IRL Richie Partridge
29 DF England ENG Stephen Wright
30 DF France FRA Djimi Traoré[notes 1]
31 DF Norway NOR Frode Kippe
33 MF England ENG Alan Navarro
37 FW Finland FIN Jari Litmanen

Left club during season[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
4 DF Cameroon CMR Rigobert Song (to West Ham United)
5 DF Republic of Ireland IRL Steve Staunton (to Aston Villa)
18 FW Netherlands NED Erik Meijer (to Hamburger SV)
No. Pos. Nation Player
22 FW Guinea GUI Titi Camara (to West Ham United)
32 FW England ENG Jon Newby (to Bury)
GK United States USA Brad Friedel (to Blackburn Rovers)

Transfers[edit]

In[edit]

# Pos Player From Fee Date
24 MF France Bernard Diomède France Auxerre £3,000,000 7 June 2000
21 MF Scotland Gary McAllister England Coventry City Free 1 July 2000
19 GK Guadeloupe Pegguy Arphexad England Leicester City Free 1 July 2000
6 DF Germany Markus Babbel Germany Bayern Munich Free 1 July 2000
20 MF England Nick Barmby England Everton £6,000,000 18 July 2000
3 DF Germany Christian Ziege England Middlesbrough £5,500,000 25 July 2000
27 DF France Grégory Vignal France Montpellier £500,000 22 September 2000
FW Finland Daniel Sjölund England West Ham United £1,000,000 28 November 2000
25 MF Croatia Igor Bišćan Croatia Dinamo Zagreb £5,500,000 7 December 2000
37 FW Finland Jari Litmanen Spain Barcelona Free 4 January 2001

Out[edit]

# Pos Player To Fee Date
20 DF Norway Stig Inge Bjørnebye England Blackburn Rovers £300,000 26 June 2000
6 DF Republic of Ireland Phil Babb[notes 2] Portugal Sporting CP Free 1 July 2000
25 MF England David Thompson England Coventry City £2,750,000 3 August 2000
21 DF Scotland Dominic Matteo[notes 3] England Leeds United £4,750,000 18 August 2000
19 GK United States Brad Friedel England Blackburn Rovers Free 3 November 2000
4 DF Cameroon Rigobert Song England West Ham United £2,500,000 28 November 2000
5 DF Republic of Ireland Steve Staunton England Aston Villa Free 6 December 2000
18 FW Netherlands Erik Meijer Germany Hamburger SV Free 11 December 2000
22 FW Guinea Titi Camara England West Ham United £2,600,000 21 December 2000
27 FW Iceland Haukur Ingi Guðnason Iceland Keflavík Free 27 December 2000
32 FW England Jon Newby England Bury £100,000 20 March 2001
  • Income: Increase £13,000,000
  • Spending: Decrease £21,500,000
  • Overall spending: Decrease £8,500,000

Events of the season[edit]

August[edit]

Gérard Houllier prepared for his third season at the Liverpool helm, looking to improve on the fourth-place finish of the previous campaign which had seen the Reds having to settle for a place in the UEFA Cup when they had come so close to qualifying for the UEFA Champions League.

The campaign began with a 1–0 home win over relegation favourites Bradford City, who had defeated Liverpool last season to deny the Reds Champions League qualification; Emile Heskey scored the only goal of the game. A 2–0 defeat at Arsenal followed, before a thrilling 3–3 draw at Southampton in which Michael Owen was on target twice.

September[edit]

September began well with good home wins over Aston Villa and Manchester City. The European adventure then began with a 1–0 away win over Romanian side Rapid București in the first round first leg of the UEFA Cup. The return to league action saw 1–1 draws with West Ham United and Sunderland. The month ended with a goalless home draw in the return leg against Rapid București to ensure progression to the next stage of the competition.

October[edit]

October began badly for Liverpool, who found themselves on the receiving end of a 3–0 defeat by Chelsea in the league. Two weeks later, however, an Emile Heskey hat-trick gave them a 4–0 win at Derby County which put them in fourth place, four points behind leaders Manchester United and second placed Arsenal and a point behind third placed Leicester City. Heskey was on target in the next two games that month – a 1–0 win over Slovan Liberec in the UEFA Cup second round first leg at Anfield and the 3–1 win over Everton in the Merseyside derby, also at Anfield. [1]

November[edit]

November brought mixed results for the Reds. Their Football League Cup quest began in the third round with a 2–1 win over Chelsea after extra time. This was followed by a 4–3 league defeat to Leeds United at Elland Road. In the second round second leg of the UEFA Cup, the Reds eliminated Slovan Liberec to reach the third round. There was also an impressive 4–1 home win over Coventry City in the league, followed by 2–1 defeats at Tottenham Hotspur and Newcastle United, and finally an 8–0 away demolition of Division Two side Stoke City in the fourth round of the League Cup. Liverpool were still a healthy fifth in the league but were now 12 points adrift of leaders Manchester United, in turn eight points ahead of nearest contenders Arsenal. [2]

December[edit]

December was a generally good month for the Reds, who began with a 3–0 home win over Charlton Athletic before overcoming Olympiacos in the UEFA Cup third round. Liverpool then suffering a shock 1–0 home defeat at the hands of surprise title outsiders Ipswich Town, only promoted the previous season. A Danny Murphy goal gave them a 1–0 away win over Manchester United two days before Christmas, though it did little to alter the decision of many bookmakers by this stage of the season to re-open the books on the title race, as so many of them were now certain that United would win their third successive title. The year ended with a 1–0 defeat to Middlesbrough at the Riverside Stadium on Boxing Day. The Reds ended the year in sixth place, occupying the European places along with leaders Manchester United, and the top five clubs Arsenal, Sunderland, Leicester City and Ipswich Town. [3]

January[edit]

2001 started with a 2–1 home win over Southampton, followed by a 3–0 home win over Rotherham United in the FA Cup third round. Then came a surprise 2–1 defeat by Division One strugglers Crystal Palace in the League Cup semi-final first leg at Selhurst Park, though the Reds were rampant 5-0 winners in the return leg at Anfield 14 days later to book their place in the final with Birmingham City and be presented with the opportunity to win the trophy for a record sixth time. There was also an excellent 3–0 away win over Aston Villa in the league in mid January, as well as a 2–0 win at Leeds United in the FA Cup fourth round. The month ended with a 1–1 draw against strugglers Manchester City at Maine Road. Liverpool now stood fourth in the league, with Manchester United now 15 points ahead of nearest contenders Arsenal, 16 points clear of third placed Sunderland and 18 points clear of Liverpool. Though the league was now surely beyond Liverpool's (and indeed any other team's) reach, the Reds still had three cups to play for. [4]

February[edit]

February began with an impressive 3–0 home win over struggling West Ham United and a 1–1 draw at Sunderland. Then came the return to European action – a 2–0 away win over Roma in the UEFA Cup fourth round, in which Michael Owen scored both goals. Then came a 4–2 home win over Manchester City in the FA Cup fifth round. Then came the second leg of the game against Roma, which the Reds lost 1–0 at Anfield, still enough for Liverpool to progress to the quarter-finals.

The League Cup final on 25 February was to be the first domestic cup final to be playing beyond England's borders: Wembley Stadium had closed for rebuilding in October 2000 and, until the revamped stadium was ready, all major finals in English football would be held at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, Wales. Robbie Fowler put the Reds ahead against Birmingham City after 30 minutes, only for the Division One midlanders to equalise later. With extra time played, the scores were still level and so the game went to penalties – a first for an English cup final. Liverpool won the shoot-out to end their six-year wait for a major trophy, their longest major trophy wait since the early 1960s.

March[edit]

Liverpool began March with a 2–0 defeat at Leicester City before travelling to Portugal for the UEFA Cup quarter final first leg with Porto, which ended in a goalless draw. Then came the all-Merseyside FA Cup quarter-final – not against Everton, but against Wirral-based Tranmere Rovers, managed by former Liverpool striker John Aldridge. The Reds won 4–2 at Prenton Park, marking the end of a complicated story for Tranmere, who were on their way to relegation from Division One – and for Aldridge, who left the club within weeks of this game. Four days later, Porto travelled to Anfield for the quarter-final second leg, which the Reds won 2–0. The remaining games that month were a 1–1 home draw with struggling Derby County and a 2–0 home win over Manchester United, which did little except prolong United's wait for their inevitable third straight league title.

April[edit]

With Manchester United confirmed as Premier League champions on 14 April, most eyes were off the Premier League as Liverpool looked to add the FA Cup and UEFA Cup to their earlier League Cup triumph. The FA Cup semi-final at Villa Park on 8 April was against Division Two surprise package Wycombe Wanderers (in only their eighth season as a Football League club) and the Reds only narrowly managed to beat them with a slender 2–1 win. The UEFA Cup semi final first leg with Barcelona saw a goalless draw at the Camp Nou, before a penalty by 36-year-old Gary McAllister in the return leg at Anfield put the Reds through to their first post-Heysel European final.

May[edit]

After securing a third-place finish in the league and qualification for the Champions League for the first time in the post-Heysel era, the Reds enjoyed one of their finest months ever by completing a unique treble of the League Cup (won in late February), FA Cup and UEFA Cup. The FA Cup was snatched from the jaws of defeat when two late goals from Michael Owen overturned Arsenal's 1–0 lead in the final minutes of the game. The treble was completed four days later when a thrilling match against Alavés of Spain gave them a 5–4 victory in the UEFA Cup final.

Results[edit]

Pre-season and friendlies[edit]

Date Opponents H / A Result

F–A

Scorers
22 July 2000 Stoke City A 0–1
29 July 2000 SC Freiburg A 4–1 Barmby 18', Heskey 40', Owen 54', Staunton 74'
3 August 2000 Glentoran A 4–0 Fowler 9', Berger 43', Šmicer 44', Murphy 61'
5 August 2000 Benfica N 2–2 Camara 10', Owen 48'
10 August 2000 Valerenga A 1–1
(2–4 p)
Šmicer 22'
13 August 2000 Parma H 5–0 Hamann 29', Barmby 38', McAllister 59', Owen 64' (pen.), 84'

Premier League[edit]

League Table[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C) 38 24 8 6 79 31 +48 80 Qualification for the Champions League first group stage
2 Arsenal 38 20 10 8 63 38 +25 70
3 Liverpool 38 20 9 9 71 39 +32 69 Qualification for the Champions League third qualifying round[a]
4 Leeds United 38 20 8 10 64 43 +21 68 Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round[a]
5 Ipswich Town 38 20 6 12 57 42 +15 66
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Since Liverpool won the League Cup and qualified for the Champions League, their UEFA Cup place went to fifth-placed Ipswich Town. Since both FA Cup finalists, Liverpool and Arsenal, qualified for the Champions League, the berth in the UEFA Cup went to sixth-placed Chelsea. Both Ipswich and Chelsea were the highest-ranked team not already qualified for a European competition.

Results by round[edit]

Round1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132333435363738
GroundHAAHHAHAAHHAHAAHHAHAAAHAHAAHHAHAHAAHHA
ResultWLDWWDDLWWWLWLLWLWWLWWDDWDLDWDLWWWWWDW
Position7141265448633434646546432222333333555433
Source: Competitive Matches
A = Away; H = Home; W = Win; D = Draw; L = Loss

Matches[edit]

19 August 2000 1 Liverpool 1–0 Bradford City Liverpool, Merseyside
Heskey Goal 67' Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,183
Referee: Paul Durkin
21 August 2000 2 Arsenal 2–0 Liverpool London
Lauren Goal 8'
Henry Goal 89'
Report Stadium: Highbury
Attendance: 38,014
Referee: Graham Poll
26 August 2000 3 Southampton 3–3 Liverpool Southampton
Pahars Goal 73'90'
El Khalej Goal 85'
Report Owen Goal 24'64'
Hyypiä Goal 55'
Stadium: The Dell
Attendance: 15,202
Referee: Jeff Winter
6 September 2000 4 Liverpool 3–1 Aston Villa Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 5'14'33' Report Stone Goal 83' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,360
Referee: Neale Barry
9 September 2000 5 Liverpool 3–2 Manchester City Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 11'
Hamann Goal 56'82'
Report Weah Goal 67'
Horlock Goal 81' (pen.)
Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,692
Referee: Graham Barber
17 September 2000 6 West Ham United 1–1 Liverpool Newham, London
Di Canio Goal 69' (pen.) Report Gerrard Goal 12' Stadium: Upton Park
Attendance: 25,998
Referee: David Elleray
23 September 2000 7 Liverpool 1–1 Sunderland Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 30' Report Phillips Goal 14' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,713
Referee: Mike Riley
1 October 2000 8 Chelsea 3–0 Liverpool Fulham, London
Westerveld Goal 10' (o.g.)
Hasselbaink Goal 11'
Guðjohnsen Goal 71'
Report Stadium: Stamford Bridge
Attendance: 34,966
Referee: Dermot Gallagher
15 October 2000 9 Derby County 0–4 Liverpool Derby, Derbyshire
Report Heskey Goal 17'54'67'
Berger Goal 80'
Stadium: Pride Park Stadium
Attendance: 30,532
Referee: Steve Bennett
21 October 2000 10 Liverpool 1–0 Leicester City Liverpool, Merseyside
Heskey Goal 69' Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,395
Referee: Andy D'Urso
29 October 2000 11 Liverpool 3–1 Everton Liverpool, Merseyside
Barmby Goal 12'
Heskey Goal 55'
Berger Goal 78' (pen.)
Report Campbell Goal 17' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,718
Referee: Paul Durkin
4 November 2000 12 Leeds United 4–3 Liverpool Leeds, West Yorkshire
Viduka Goal 24'46'73'75' Report Hyypiä Goal 2'
Ziege Goal 18'
Šmicer Goal 61'
Stadium: Elland Road
Attendance: 40,055
Referee: David Elleray
12 November 2000 13 Liverpool 4–1 Coventry City Liverpool, Merseyside
McAllister Goal 13'
Gerrard Goal 51'
Heskey Goal 82'87'
Report Thompson Goal 56' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,701
Referee: Mike Riley
19 November 2000 14 Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Liverpool Haringey, London
Ferdinand Goal 31'
Sherwood Goal 40'
Report Fowler Goal 17' Stadium: White Hart Lane
Attendance: 36,036
Referee: Mark Halsey
26 November 2000 15 Newcastle United 2–1 Liverpool Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Tyneside
Solano Goal 4'
Dyer Goal 70'
Report Heskey Goal 78' Stadium: St. James' Park
Attendance: 51,949
Referee: [Barry Knight}
2 December 2000 16 Liverpool 3–0 Charlton Athletic Liverpool, Merseyside
Fish Goal 5' (o.g.)
Heskey Goal 78'
Babbel Goal 90'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,515
10 December 2000 17 Liverpool 0–1 Ipswich Town Liverpool, Merseyside
Report Stewart Goal 45' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,509
17 December 2000 18 Manchester United 0–1 Liverpool Trafford, Greater Manchester
Report Murphy Goal 43' Stadium: Old Trafford
Attendance: 67,533
23 December 2000 19 Liverpool 4–0 Arsenal Liverpool, Merseyside
Gerrard Goal 12'
Owen Goal 62'
Barmby Goal 71'
Fowler Goal 84'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,144
Referee: Paul Durkin
26 December 2000 20 Middlesbrough 1–0 Liverpool Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire
Karembeu Goal 44' Report Stadium: Riverside Stadium
Attendance: 34,696
1 January 2001 21 Liverpool 2–1 Southampton Liverpool, Merseyside
Gerrard Goal 12'
Babbel Goal 86'
Report Soltvedt Goal 20' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 38,474
13 January 2001 22 Aston Villa 0–3 Liverpool Birmingham
Report Murphy Goal 24'53'
Gerrard Goal 32'
Stadium: Villa Park
Attendance: 41,366
20 January 2001 23 Liverpool 0–0 Middlesbrough Liverpool, Merseyside
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,042
31 January 2001 24 Manchester City 1–1 Liverpool Manchester, Greater Manchester
Tiatto Goal 48' Report Heskey Goal 43' Stadium: Maine Road
Attendance: 34,629
3 February 2001 25 Liverpool 3–0 West Ham United Liverpool, Merseyside
Šmicer Goal 20'
Fowler Goal 45'57'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,045
10 February 2001 26 Sunderland 1–1 Liverpool Sunderland, Wearside
Hutchison Goal 51' Report Litmanen Goal 79' (pen.) Stadium: Stadium of Light
Attendance: 47,553
3 March 2001 27 Leicester City 2–0 Liverpool Leicester, Leicestershire
Akinbiyi Goal 51'
Izzet Goal 90'
Report Stadium: Filbert Street
Attendance: 21,924
18 March 2001 28 Liverpool 1–1 Derby County Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 52' Report Burton Goal 9' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,362
31 March 2001 29 Liverpool 2–0 Manchester United Liverpool, Merseyside
Gerrard Goal 16'
Fowler Goal 40'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,806
10 April 2001 30 Ipswich Town 1–1 Liverpool Ipswich, Suffolk
Armstrong Goal 77' Report Heskey Goal 46' Stadium: Portman Road
Attendance: 23,504
13 April 2001 31 Liverpool 1–2 Leeds United Liverpool, Merseyside
Gerrard Goal 55' Report Ferdinand Goal 4'
Bowyer Goal 33'
Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,116
16 April 2001 32 Everton 2–3 Liverpool Liverpool, Merseyside
Ferguson Goal 42'
Unsworth Goal 83' (pen.)
Report Heskey Goal 5'
Babbel Goal 57'
McAllister Goal 90+4'
Stadium: Goodison Park
Attendance: 40,260
22 April 2001 33 Liverpool 3–1 Tottenham Hotspur Liverpool, Merseyside
Heskey Goal 7'
McAllister Goal 73' (pen.)
Fowler Goal 88'
Report Korsten Goal 24' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,547
28 April 2001 34 Coventry City 0–2 Liverpool Coventry
Report Hyypiä Goal 83'
McAllister Goal 86'
Stadium: Highfield Road
Attendance: 23,063
1 May 2001 35 Bradford City 0–2 Liverpool Bradford
Report Owen Goal 47'
McAllister Goal 67'
Stadium: Valley Parade
Attendance: 22,057
5 May 2001 36 Liverpool 3–0 Newcastle United Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 25'72'81' Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,363
8 May 2001 37 Liverpool 2–2 Chelsea Liverpool, Merseyside
Owen Goal 8'60' Report Hasselbaink Goal 13'67' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,588
19 May 2001 38 Charlton Athletic 0–4 Liverpool London
Report Fowler Goal 55'71'
Murphy Goal 60'
Owen Goal 81'
Stadium: The Valley
Attendance: 20,043

League Cup[edit]

1 November 2000 3 Liverpool 2–1 (a.e.t.) Chelsea Liverpool
Murphy Goal 11'
Fowler Goal 104'
Report Zola Goal 29' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 29,370
Referee: Rob Harris
29 November 2000 4 Stoke City 0–8 Liverpool Stoke-on-Trent
Report Ziege Goal 6'
Šmicer Goal 26'
Babbel Goal 28'
Fowler Goal 39'82'85' (pen.)
Hyypiä Goal 59'
Murphy Goal 65'
Stadium: Britannia Stadium
Attendance: 27,109
Referee: Andy D'Urso
13 December 2000 5 Liverpool 3–0 (a.e.t.) Fulham Liverpool
Owen Goal 105'
Šmicer Goal 114'
Barmby Goal 120'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 20,144
Referee: Dermot Gallagher
10 January 2001 Semi-final
leg 1
Crystal Palace 2–1 Liverpool Croydon, London
20:00 Rubins Goal 56'
Morrison Goal 77'
Report Šmicer Goal 78' Stadium: Selhurst Park
Attendance: 25,933
Referee: Uriah Rennie
24 January 2001 Semi-final
leg 2
Liverpool 5–0
(6-2 agg.)
Crystal Palace Liverpool
20:00 Šmicer Goal 13'
Murphy Goal 15'51'
Bišćan Goal 18'
Fowler Goal 89'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 41,854
Referee: Paul Durkin

FA Cup[edit]

6 January 2001 3 Liverpool 3–0 Rotherham United Liverpool, Merseyside
Heskey Goal 47' Goal 75'
Hamann Goal 73'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 30,689
Referee: Mark Halsey
27 January 2001 4 Leeds United 0–2 Liverpool Leeds, West Yorkshire
Report Barmby Goal 88'
Heskey Goal 90'
Stadium: Elland Road
Attendance: 37,108
Referee: Andy D'Urso
18 February 2001 5 Liverpool 4–2 Manchester City Liverpool, Merseyside
Litmanen Goal 7' (pen.)
Heskey Goal 13'
Šmicer Goal 54' (pen.)
Babbel Goal 85'
Report Kanchelskis Goal 29'
Goater Goal 90'
Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 36,231
Referee: Graham Poll
11 March 2001 6 Tranmere Rovers 2–4 Liverpool Birkenhead, Wirral
Steve Yates Goal 47'
Allison Goal 58'
Report Murphy Goal 12'
Owen Goal 27'
Gerrard Goal 52'
Fowler Goal 82' (pen.)
Stadium: Prenton Park
Attendance: 16,342
Referee: Alan Wiley
8 April 2001 Semi-final Wycombe Wanderers 1–2 Liverpool Birmingham, West Midlands
16:00 Ryan Goal 88' Report Heskey Goal 78'
Fowler Goal 83'
Stadium: Villa Park
Attendance: 40,037
Referee: Paul Durkin
12 May 2001 Final Arsenal 1–2 Liverpool Cardiff
15:00 BST Ljungberg Yellow card 62' Goal 72' Report Hamann Yellow card 57'
Owen Goal 83'88'
Stadium: Millennium Stadium
Attendance: 72,500
Referee: Steve Dunn

UEFA Cup[edit]

First round[edit]

14 September 2000 Rapid București Romania 0–1 England Liverpool Bucharest, Romania
Report Barmby Goal 29' Stadium: Giulești Stadium
Attendance: 9,782
Referee: Denmark Nicolai Volquartz
28 September 2000 Liverpool England 0–0
(1–0 agg.)
Romania Rapid București Liverpool, England
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 37,954
Referee: Czech Republic Miroslav Liba

Second round[edit]

26 October 2000 Liverpool England 1–0 Czech Republic Slovan Liberec Liverpool, England
Heskey Goal 87' Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 29,662
Referee: Switzerland Massimo Busacca
9 November 2000 Slovan Liberec Czech Republic 2–3
(2–4 agg.)
England Liverpool Liberec, Czech Republic
Štajner Goal 9'
Breda Goal 89'
Report Barmby Goal 31'
Heskey Goal 76'
Owen Goal 82'
Stadium: Stadion u Nisy
Attendance: 6,808
Referee: Germany Edgar Steinborn

Third round[edit]

23 November 2000 Olympiacos Greece 2–2 England Liverpool Athens, Greece
Alexandris Goal 65'92' Report Barmby Goal 38'
Gerrard Goal 67'
Stadium: Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 43,855
Referee: Netherlands René Temmink
7 December 2000 Liverpool England 2–0
(4–2 agg.)
Greece Olympiacos Liverpool, England
Heskey Goal 28'
Barmby Goal 60'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 35,484
Referee: Portugal Vítor Melo Pereira

Fourth round[edit]

15 February 2001 Roma Italy 0–2 England Liverpool Rome, Italy
Report Owen Goal 46'72' Stadium: Stadio Olimpico
Attendance: 59,718
Referee: Germany Markus Merk
22 February 2001 Liverpool England 0–1
(2–1 agg.)
Italy Roma Liverpool, England
Report Guigou Goal 70' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 43,688
Referee: Spain José María García-Aranda

Quarter-finals[edit]

8 March 2001 Porto Portugal 0–0 England Liverpool Porto, Portugal
Report Stadium: Estádio das Antas
Attendance: 21,502
Referee: Italy Pierluigi Collina
15 March 2001 Liverpool England 2–0
(2–0 agg.)
Portugal Porto Liverpool, England
Murphy Goal 33'
Owen Goal 37'
Report Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 40,502
Referee: Denmark Kim Milton Nielsen

Semi-finals[edit]

5 April 2001 Barcelona Spain 0–0 England Liverpool Barcelona, Spain
Zenden Yellow card 88' Report Fowler Yellow card 86' Stadium: Camp Nou
Attendance: 90,832
Referee: Germany Hellmut Krug
19 April 2001 Liverpool England 1–0
(1–0 agg.)
Spain Barcelona Liverpool, England
McAllister Goal 44' (pen.)
Westerveld Yellow card 85'
Report Sabrosa Yellow card 62' Stadium: Anfield
Attendance: 44,203
Referee: Switzerland Urs Meier

Final[edit]

16 May 2001 Final Liverpool England 5–4 (a.e.t.) Spain Alavés Dortmund, Germany
20:45 Babbel Goal 3' Yellow card 106'
McAllister Yellow card 11' Goal 40' (pen.)
Gerrard Goal 16'
Fowler Goal 72'
Geli Golden goal 116'  (o.g.)
Report Astudillo Yellow card 11'
Alonso Goal 26'
Herrera Yellow card 40'
Moreno Goal 47'59'
Contra Yellow card 49'
Karmona Yellow card 58' Yellow-red card 116'
Magno Yellow card 82' Yellow-red card 98'
Cruyff Goal 88'
Téllez Yellow card 95'
Stadium: Westfalen
Attendance: 48,050
Referee: France Gilles Veissière

Statistics[edit]

Player statistics[edit]

As of 31 June 2001
No. Pos Nat Player Total Premier League FA Cup League Cup UEFA Cup
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
1 GK Netherlands Sander Westerveld 61 0 38 0 6 0 4 0 13 0
2 DF Switzerland Stéphane Henchoz 53 0 32 0 5 0 6 0 10 0
3 DF Germany Christian Ziege 32 2 11+5 1 2+1 0 1+3 1 6+3 0
4 DF Cameroon Rigobert Song 4 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
5 DF Republic of Ireland Steve Staunton 2 0 0+1 0 0 0 0 0 0+1 0
6 DF Germany Markus Babbel 60 6 38 3 5 1 4 1 13 1
7 MF Czech Republic Vladimír Šmicer 49 7 16+11 2 4+1 1 5+1 4 6+5 0
8 FW England Emile Heskey 56 22 33+3 14 3+2 5 3+1 0 9+2 3
9 FW England Robbie Fowler 48 17 15+12 8 3+2 2 5 6 6+5 1
10 FW England Michael Owen 46 24 20+8 16 4+1 3 1+1 1 10+1 4
12 DF Finland Sami Hyypiä 58 4 35 3 6 0 6 1 11 0
13 MF England Danny Murphy 47 10 13+14 4 4+1 1 5 4 6+4 1
14 DF Norway Vegard Heggem 4 0 1+2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
15 MF Czech Republic Patrik Berger 21 2 11+3 2 0+1 0 1 0 3+2 0
16 MF Germany Dietmar Hamann 53 3 26+4 2 5 1 2+3 0 13 0
17 MF England Steven Gerrard 50 10 29+4 7 2+2 1 4 0 9 2
18 FW Netherlands Erik Meijer 3 0 0+3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
19 GK France Pegguy Arphexad 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
20 MF England Nick Barmby 46 8 21+5 2 2+3 1 2+4 1 6+3 4
21 MF Scotland Gary McAllister 49 8 21+9 5 4+1 1 2+3 0 4+5 2
23 DF England Jamie Carragher 58 0 30+4 0 6 0 6 0 12 0
24 MF France Bernard Diomède 4 0 1+1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
25 MF Croatia Igor Bišćan 21 2 8+5 0 3+1 1 4 1 0 0
26 MF Republic of Ireland Richie Partridge 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
27 DF France Grégory Vignal 7 0 4+2 0 0+1 0 0 0 0 0
29 DF England Stephen Wright 4 0 0+2 0 1 0 0+1 0 0 0
30 DF France Djimi Traoré 12 0 8 0 0 0 1 0 2+1 0
37 MF Finland Jari Litmanen 9 2 4+1 1 1+1 1 1+1 0 0 0

Goalscorers[edit]

Includes all competitive matches.

As of match played 18 May 2016
Rank Pos. No. Player Premier League FA Cup League Cup UEFA Cup Total
1 FW 10 England Michael Owen 16 3 1 4 24
2 FW 8 England Emile Heskey 14 5 0 3 22
3 FW 9 England Robbie Fowler 8 2 6 1 17
4 MF 17 England Steven Gerrard 7 1 0 2 10
MF 13 England Danny Murphy 4 1 4 1 10
6 MF 20 England Nick Barmby 2 1 1 4 8
7 MF 21 Scotland Gary McAllister 5 0 0 2 7
MF 7 Czech Republic Vladimír Šmicer 2 1 4 0 7
9 DF 6 England Markus Babbel 3 1 1 1 6
10 DF 12 Finland Sami Hyypiä 3 0 1 0 4
11 MF 16 Germany Dietmar Hamann 2 1 0 0 3
12 MF 15 Czech Republic Patrik Berger 2 0 0 0 2
MF 37 Finland Jari Litmanen 1 1 0 0 2
DF 3 Germany Christian Ziege 1 1 0 0 2
15 DF 25 Croatia Igor Bišćan 0 1 0 0 1
Own goal 1 0 0 1 2
TOTALS 71 20 17 19 127

[5]

Competition top scorers[edit]

Competition Result Top scorer
Premier League 3rd England Michael Owen, 16
UEFA Cup Winners England Nick Barmby, 4
England Michael Owen, 4
FA Cup Winners England Emile Heskey, 5
League Cup Winners England Robbie Fowler, 6
Overall England Michael Owen, 24

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Charlton 0 Liverpool 4". Liverpoolfc.tv. 19 May 2001. Archived from the original on 8 June 2001. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  2. ^ "Liverpool 5 Alaves 4". UEFA.com. 16 May 2001. Archived from the original on 7 August 2001. Retrieved 5 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Blues shot down as Liverpool lift cup". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 25 February 2001. Retrieved 8 May 2012.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Traoré was born in Saint-Ouen, France, but also qualified to represent Mali internationally and would make his international debut for Mali in 2004.
  2. ^ Babb was born in Lambeth, England, but also qualified to represent the Republic of Ireland internationally and made his international debut for the Republic of Ireland in 1994.
  3. ^ Matteo was born in Dumfries, Scotland, but was raised in England from the age of four and represented them at U-21 and B level before making his international debut for Scotland in November 2000.

External links[edit]