2000 in British television

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

List of years in British television (table)

This is a list of British television related events from 2000.

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • 1 February – Greg Dyke takes over as Director General of the BBC.[24]
  • 3 February – Joe Absolom makes his final EastEnders appearance in a dramatic storyline that sees his character, Matthew Rose get his revenge against Steve Owen after Rose was wrongly convicted of the manslaughter of Owen's girlfriend.[25]
  • 5 February – Episode of Casualty in which the character Amy Howard (played by Rebecca Wheatley) is persuaded to attend a singing audition. The song she performs, "Stay with Me Baby" is subsequently released as a single by Wheatley, who had been a singer prior to her acting career.[26]
  • 7 February – BBC Director-General Greg Dyke launches his "Cut the Crap" initiative, a drive to cut red tape at the BBC. Staff are issued with yellow cards bearing the phrase "Cut the crap, make it happen" which they are encouraged to brandish at meetings if they feel inertia is getting in the way of creativity.[27]
  • 10 February – Coronation Street confirms that Jane Danson, who plays Leanne Battersby will leave the soap later in the year.[28]
  • 11 February – Debut of Reach For The Moon on ITV, starring Lynda Bellingham.
  • 12 February – BBC One airs When Changing Rooms Met Ground Force, a cross over edition of its two popular design and makeover shows, Changing Rooms and Ground Force.[29]
  • 13 February – BBC Two airs Gimme Some Truth, a documentary featuring footage of John Lennon as he recorded his 1971 album Imagine.[30]
  • 15 February – BBC One airs a one-off quiz, A Question of EastEnders to celebrate the soap's 15th anniversary.[31]
  • 18 February – Kevin Pallister leaves Emmerdale as Graham Clark.
  • 19 February – EastEnders celebrates its 15th anniversary on BBC One.[32]
  • 23 February – The very first episode of the children's drama Hero to Zero has its screening on BBC One.[33]
  • 24 February – The Guardian reports that Australian soap Home and Away will move from ITV to Channel 5 after the latter paid £40 million for the broadcast rights. It is the first time the channel has poached a programme from its rival.[34][35]
  • 27 February – BBC One airs the first episode of Monarch of the Glen.[36]

March[edit]

  • 1 March – Carlton Select closes, with Carlton's two other channels, Carlton Cinema and Carlton Food Network expanding their broadcasting hours in the wake of the Select's demise.[37]
  • 2 March – Axe falls on EastEnders with some characters, including Ricky Butcher.
  • 5 March – Former Take That singer Gary Barlow makes his acting debut in the 150th episode of Heartbeat playing a hitchhiker named Mike Shannon.[38]
  • 7 March – Coronation Street confirms that television presenter Naomi Russell will join the series to play factory worker Bobbi Lewis.[39]
  • 11 March – ITV broadcasts The Lookalikes Agency.
  • 12 March – ITV airs the drama Hero of the Hour starring Ross Kemp.
  • 13 March – Debut of The Blind Date, a two-part ITV drama starring Zara Turner.
  • 15 March – ITV will scrap its afternoon showing of Home and Away from 27 March after losing the soap to Channel 5, but it will continue to air in the early evening slot.[40]
  • 16 March – The Britt Allcroft Company best known for producing the first five seasons of Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends acquires the rights to the long running children's arts and crafts programme Art Attack and other works from The Media Merchants company run by the former host of the series Neil Buchanan and Tim Edmunds.
  • 17 March – To mark the re-release of Stanley Kubrick's 1971 film A Clockwork Orange, FilmFour airs Return of A Clockwork Orange, a documentary discussing the controversy surrounding the film. It is also shown the following day on Channel 4.[41]
  • 19 March – Debut of Seeing Red, an ITV drama based on the book of the same name by Coral Atkins, and starring Sarah Lancashire and Richard Dillane.[42]
  • 21 March – Channel 5 broadcasts the network premiere of Metro starring Eddie Murphy.
  • 22 March – The House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport Committee issues a report calling on ITV to restore News at Ten after finding that the broadcaster has seen a drop in ratings since the programme was dropped in 1999.[43]
  • 24 March – Paul Loughran leaves Emmerdale after six years when his character Butch Dingle dies in a bus crash.[44]
  • 26 March – Debut of Doctors, BBC One's new daily serial set in a doctors' surgery. The first episode is broadcasts at 6.35pm on a Sunday evening, before continuing on weekdays at 12.30pm.[45]
  • 27 March – The BBC announces plans to establish an annual bursary at a college in Falmouth for students wishing to train in broadcast journalism as a "living tribute" to TV presenter Jill Dando.[46]
  • 28 March –
    • In its annual report, the Independent Television Commission praises Channel 5 for reducing the amount of "tacky" sex shows included in its scheduling, while 5 News, and the channel's films and factual programming are also praised. However, the watchdog criticises the amount of low budget programming shown, particularly in the early hours of the morning. The ITC also as warm words for Channel 4, in particular for the "freshness and innovation" of its programming.[47]
    • BBC Two's spring and summer season will see actor John Alford, jailed in 1999 for drug offences, make his return to television as a taxi passenger in a ten-minute short titled Talk Radio, it is reported. Other highlights include the comedy Coupling, and Rhona, the first British sitcom about a lesbian.[48]
  • 29 March – The Broadcasting Standards Commission reprimands EastEnders for episodes screened in December 1999 that featured characters attending a stag and hen weekend in Amsterdam, which showed drinking, drug taking and sexual innuendo. An episode of Goodness Gracious Me aired in February is also criticised for a sketch in which mango chutney was spread on communion bread, something that several viewers felt was disrespectful to the Eucharist.[49]
  • 30 March – UK Arena closes and is replaced by UK Drama.

April[edit]

  • 3 April – BSkyB airs the first interactive TV commercial, an advert for the cooking sauce Chicken Tonight. Viewers are offered the option of clicking the Red Button to visit Sky's interactive TV service Open, where they can order a money-off voucher and a recipe book, and browse through recipes.[50]
  • 12 April – ITV screens the second Pride of Britain Awards, which attracts an audience of 10.2 million. The figures prove to be a surprise for the broadcaster, and are higher than those achieved by the 2000 BRIT Awards, which had 8.8 million viewers, and the BAFTA Awards that aired on Sky One and had a viewership of 100,000.[51]
  • 14 April – Former MI5 Officer David Shayler—who fled from the UK after passing secret documents to the Mail on Sunday—appears as a guest on Have I Got News for You. Because he faces arrest if he returns to the UK his contribution is recorded via satellite from a studio in France.[52][53]
  • 16 April – The shopping channel Ideal World is launched.
  • 17 April – A former researcher on The Vanessa Show wins libel damages against The Mirror newspaper after it published an article in February 1999 claiming she knew many of the guests she had hired for the show were fakes.[54]
  • 20 April – After twelve years as EastEnders' Ricky Butcher, Sid Owen makes his final appearance in the soap, where his character is seen departing for Europe in a lorry.[55]
  • 28 April – Channel 4 confirms that Liza Tarbuck will leave The Big Breakfast to return to acting after the presenter broke the news on the programme's website. She will leave in August at the end of her year-long contract.[56]
  • 30 April – Guinness's 1999 "Surfer" advertisement is voted No. 1 in a poll of the top 100 greatest television adverts of all time in a poll for Channel 4.[57]

May[edit]

June[edit]

  • 2 June – Johnny Vaughan confirms he will step down as co-presenter of The Big Breakfast in early 2001.[69]
  • 4 June –
    • 13-year-old Coronation Street character Sarah Platt (played by Tina O'Brien) gives birth to a baby daughter called Bethany, a storyline which intensifies a national public and media frenzy surrounding the topic of teenage pregnancy.[70]
    • Marjorie Lang wins the 2000 series of MasterChef.
  • 6 June – Channel 5 airs the one-off game show Naked Jungle as part of its Naturism Week. The show features presenter Keith Chegwin and contestants completing a number of puzzle-type tasks in a jungle environment.[71] The programme sparks a debate about nudity on television, and is mentioned in the House of Commons, where Culture Secretary Chris Smith questions the quality of British television content.[72]
  • 8 June – After 11 years Home and Away is shown on ITV for the last time.[73] It returns on Channel Five on 16 July 2001.[74] The show's year-long absence occurs because of a clause in ITV's contract preventing it from being broadcast for at least a year after its ITV run ends.[73]
  • 10 June – 2 July – Euro 2000 is held jointly by Belgium and the Netherlands.
  • 15 June –
  • 20 June – A failure at a substation in Shepherd's Bush causes a power cut at BBC Television Centre and leads to major disruption to BBC television and radio services.[77]
  • 28 June – The Broadcasting Standards Commission upholds twelve viewer complaints about the London Weekend Television documentary Aircraft Emergencies, which showed slow motion footage of air crashes against the backdrop of dramatic music. The Commission felt the programme was too voyeuristic and would have added to the distress of those involved in the incidents.[78]
  • 29 June – It is announced that Lisa Riley will leave her role as Emmerdale's Mandy Dingle in the autumn.[79]

July[edit]

  • 1 July – C-Day in the United Kingdom. From today, most commercial broadcasters begin broadcasting commercials, promotions, and idents in 16:9 widescreen ratio.[80]
  • 3 July – ITV announce that Emmerdale will air five nights a week from the autumn.[81]
  • 6 July – First episode of a new police procedural drama Burnside was broadcast on ITV.
  • 11 July – Eric Richard, who plays the long serving Sergeant Bob Cryer in The Bill is to leave the series, it is reported.[82]
  • 14 July – The television reality show Big Brother debuts in the UK.[83]
  • 17 July – ITV launches a £500,000 advertising campaign fronted by Jerry Springer and aimed at repositioning ITV2 as a general entertainment channel. When launched in December 1998 the channel had promoted itself as a younger alternative to ITV[84]
  • 20 July – The Independent Television Commission says it will issue a "legally binding" directive to ITV to move its 11.00pm news bulletin forward an hour if it does not restore News at Ten. The ITC have been concerned about the 11.00pm bulletin's low ratings.[85]
  • 22 July – The ten part popular culture series I Love the '70s debuts on BBC Two, with I Love 1970.[86] With each edition dedicated to a different year of the decade, the series concludes on 23 September with I Love 1979.[87]
  • 27 July – ITV says it will apply for a High Court judicial review into the ITC's decision to order it to move its 11.00pm news bulletin.[88]
  • 28 July – BBC One introduces its daytime soap Doctors into the evening schedule, with the first of seven weekly episodes planned to air in the Friday 7.00pm slot.[89] The episodes are shown in that slot up to Friday 1 September,[90] with the final episode of the run airing at 7.00pm on Thursday 7 September.[91]

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • 1–2 September – Sky One hosts a special weekend dedicated to celebrating the 10th Anniversary of The Simpsons in the UK.[105]
  • 5 September – The BBC has given its permission for the Teletubbies to be used in promotional material for a controversial windfarm in Wales in order to help win over critics.[106]
  • 7 September – Gretchen Franklin makes her final EastEnders appearance as Ethel Skinner. The character is involved in a controversial euthanasia storyline after asking her friend Dot Cotton (June Brown) to help her end her life because she has terminal cancer.[107][108]
  • 11 September –
    • Granada Media plc agrees to acquire 45% of Irish commercial broadcaster TV3 from the channel's original consortium as part of a deal giving TV3 the right to simulcast programming with ITV.[109]
    • BBC One airs Episode 2000 of EastEnders.
  • 12 September –
    • As the fuel protests begin to affect motorists and businesses, Sky News introduces its news ticker, and regular updates to keep viewers informed of events concerning the developing crisis. BBC News and ITV News begin regular updates the following day. Through the duration of the crisis, the rolling news channels see an increase in viewers, while audiences for bulletins on BBC One and ITV increase by as much as 50 percent, their highest since the Kosovo War.[110]
    • Debut of Jailbreak, a reality television show described as Channel 5's answer to Big Brother, in which contestants can win £100,000 by escaping from a mock prison. The three-week show, presented by Craig Charles, Ruth England and Charlie Stayt is criticised by prisoners' groups.[111] Roberta Woodhouse, Hannah Davies and Laura Hawkins become the first contestants to escape on 23 September.[112]
  • 13 September – Peter Salmon, current Controller of BBC One is appointed the broadcaster's new Director of Sport.[113]
  • 14 September – Lorraine Heggessey is appointed Controller of BBC One, becoming the first woman to hold the post. She will take over from present Controller, Peter Salmon on 1 November.[114]
  • 15 September –
  • 15 September–1 October – The BBC broadcasts the 2000 Olympic Games with live coverage on BBC One from late evening until the following lunchtime. BBC Two provides alternative live mid-morning coverage during the first week.
  • 18 September –
  • 20 September – BBC Two airs a special seventies edition of TOTP2.[118]
  • 21 September – ITV announces the return of News at Ten, which will air on at least three nights a week from the New Year. The decision comes a week before a judicial review into the ITC's order for the bulletin to be restored was to be heard.[119]
  • 27 September – BBC Two airs a special edition of TOTP2 featuring the hits of John Lennon, and presented by Yoko Ono.[120]
  • 30 September – BBC One airs a special gala concert paying tribute to Jill Dando, featuring some of her favourite artists. The concert was arranged to raise funds for the Jill Dando Institute, a crime science unit planned in her memory.[121][122]
  • September–October – Jacky Rowland, the BBC News Foreign Correspondent in Yugoslavia is expelled from that country in the wake of the presidential election that saw Vojislav Koštunica defeat Slobodan Milošević, for alleged biased reporting. However, it later emerged Rowland did not leave Yugoslavia, but stayed in hiding as events surrounding the overthrow of Slobodan Milošević unfolded before emerging to report on its conclusion.[123][124]

October[edit]

  • 1 October –
  • 2 October –
    • Q TV a television music channel based on Q Magazine, is launched.[129]
    • ITV soap Emmerdale begins airing five nights a week.
    • The first edition of the BBC's revamped breakfast news programme BBC Breakfast is broadcast. The new programme is carried on both BBC One and BBC News 24 – previously News 24 had aired its own breakfast programme Breakfast 24.
  • 3 October – The BBC confirms it will move its Nine O'Clock News to 10.00pm from 16 October to complete with ITV's relaunch of News at Ten. The announcement causes surprise as it had been expected the changes would take effect from October 2001.[130] Politicians from all major political parties criticise the BBC's decision, fearing it will affect news quality.[131]
  • 4 October –
    • Prince Charles joins several television celebrities, including Gaby Roslin and Des Lynam to promote Loud Tie Day, a campaign to raise awareness of bowel cancer.[132]
    • Comedy sketches involving abortion, dead babies and people with disabilities that appeared in episodes of Channel 4's Jam are criticised by the Broadcasting Standards Commission because they went "beyond acceptable boundaries in their treatment of issues of particular sensitivity which required greater respect for the vulnerability of those depicted".[133]
  • 5 October – Launch of bid-up.tv, later bid.tv.
  • 7 October – The BBC Saturday morning children's entertainment series Live & Kicking is relaunched, featuring former Blue Peter presenter Katy Hill, Sarah Cawood, Ortis Deley and Trey Farley.[134]
  • 9 October –
  • 13 October – The flagship BBC One news programme the Nine O'Clock News ends after a run of 30 years after the BBC earlier announced that it was to move the bulletin to 10:00 pm. The BBC News at Ten is launched on Monday 16 October. The change attracts criticism from both the National Consumer Council and the Culture Secretary Chris Smith. The BBC Nine O'Clock News also moves to its dedicated channel on the same day. ITV later announces its intention to reinstate News at Ten from January 2001.[138]
  • 16 October – Oxfordshire, once part of the BBC's South East region, becomes part of South Today.
  • 20 October – Have I Got News for You returns for a new series, moving from BBC Two to BBC One.[139]
  • 21 October –
    • Parkinson returns to BBC One for a new series as part of the Saturday night schedule, having previously aired on Fridays since its relaunch in 1998.[140]
    • Helicopter pilot Duncan Bickley loses £218,000 on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? after incorrectly answering the £500,000 question. Having reached £250,000 his winnings dropped back to £32,000 after he gave the wrong answer to a question about the name of the aircraft in which Amy Johnson flew solo to Australia in 1930.[141]
  • 26 October – 15-year-old Sonia Jackson, a character in EastEnders played by Natalie Cassidy, unexpectedly gives birth to a baby girl called Chloe.[142][143][144]
  • 28 October –
  • 30 October –
  • 31 October – The Weakest Link makes its BBC One debut as part of the channel's evening schedule.[148] Billed as the Champions' League, the series sees winning contestants from BBC Two's daytime version of the quiz return to compete for a £20,000 prize, double the amount offered by the daily show.[149]

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • 1 December – The BBC apologises to ITV for suggesting it rigged Judith Keppel's win on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? as part of a ratings battle.[166]
  • 2 December – Nicola Kirsch wins the twelfth series of Stars in Their Eyes, performing as Maria Callas.[167]
  • 8 December –
  • 9 December – Westlife's single "My Love" wins the 2000 Record of the Year, giving the Irish boy band their second win in a row.[170]
  • 10 December – Steve Redgrave is named as this year's BBC Sports Personality of the Year.[171]
  • 11 December –
    • BBC One airs a BBC News special, Prince William in Chile, showing footage of Prince William's charity expedition to Chilean Patagonia with Raleigh International. The prince was interviewed and filmed during the ten-week trip, with an interview released to the media on 10 December.[172]
    • The Independent Television Commission criticises Channel 4's early evening scheduling of US TV series Angel, a drama about a reformed vampire, which it says includes scenes "reminiscent of a late-night horror film". The channel aired edited episodes of the series in the early evening, but some viewers had complained it was inappropriate for children, while others had complained about the scenes being cut. The ITC felt that three of the edited episodes had still contained unsuitable matter for family viewing. The series has since been moved to a later time slot, where it can be aired uncut.[173]
  • 12 December – Culture Secretary Chris Smith announces plans for the creation of the Office of Communications (Ofcom), a watchdog that would oversee the regulation of the UK broadcasting and telecommunications industries and take over responsibility from several current bodies, including the Broadcasting Standards Commission and Office of Telecommunications.[174]
  • 17 December – "Can We Fix It?", a song by Children's BBC animated character Bob the Builder, tops the UK Singles Chart becoming this year's Christmas number one.[175]
  • 18 December – The British Film Institute publishes its list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the 20th century. Compiled by a poll of industry professionals, Fawlty Towers tops the list, followed by Cathy Come Home and Doctor Who.
  • 21 December – Channel 5's 12-part series X-Rated, which includes reviews of pornographic films is criticised as unacceptable by the Independent Television Commission after it showed clips of an R18 film that can only be bought from specialist suppliers.[176]
  • 22 December – A contestant in the grand final of Series 29 of the quiz show Fifteen to One, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, is edited out of the edition. The contestant, standing at position 4, is eliminated in the first round, having answered two questions incorrectly. The two questions are cut from the sequence, while the camera jumps from positions 3 to 5. From Round 2 the show continues as normal.
  • 25 December – BBC One airs the UK television premiere of Titanic, with overnight figures giving it an audience of 9.9 million. ITV has seven of the top ten most watched programmes of the day. Other popular Christmas Day shows include Coronation Street (ITV, 13.7m), EastEnders (BBC One, 12.1m) and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? (ITV, 11.1m).[177]
  • 27 December –
    • BBC One airs a celebrity edition of Robot Wars; participants include Vic Reeves, Chris Eubank and boy band Five.[178]
    • ITV airs Sinatra: Good Guy Bad Guy, a programme investigating Frank Sinatra's alleged links to the Mafia. The film was made without the permission of the Sinatra family, and includes friends and colleagues discussing the late singer, some talking about him for the first time.[179]

Debuts[edit]

BBC[edit]

ITV (Including ITV and ITV2)[edit]

Channel 4[edit]

Channel 5[edit]

S4C[edit]

Sky One[edit]

Disney Channel UK[edit]

Nickelodeon UK[edit]

Channels[edit]

New channels[edit]

Date Channel
1 February Discovery Kids
Discovery Wings
27 May Boomerang
1 July TCM UK
1 August ITN News Channel
18 September Community Channel
29 September Playhouse Disney
Toon Disney
2 October Q
5 October bid-up.tv

Pay Defunct channels[edit]

Date Channel
2000 ONTV (CableTel (UK) ltd) (Pay TV (UK))

Defunct channels[edit]

Date Channel
1 February Carlton World
3 June Carlton Kids
1 July TNT UK

Television shows[edit]

Changes of network affiliation[edit]

Shows Moved from Moved to
Telly Addicts BBC One Challenge
Nine O'Clock News BBC News 24
Have I Got News for You BBC Two BBC One
Blockbusters Sky One
United States King of the Hill (First run rights) Channel 4
United States V Channel 5 Sci-Fi Channel
France/Canada Babar Nick Jr. Channel 5
Canada Mega Babies Sky One
Fat Dog Mendoza Cartoon Network
United States The Powerpuff Girls
Canada/United States Angela Anaconda Channel 4
France/Canada Fly Tales BBC One
Canada/France Mona the Vampire Nickelodeon
United Kingdom/Canada Rotten Ralph BBC One Nickelodeon
Professor Bubble The Children's Channel Living
United States Sesame Street Disney Channel Nick Jr.

Returning this year after a break of one year or longer[edit]

  • 30 October – Blockbusters (1983–93, 1994–95, 1997, 2000–01, 2012)
  • 17 November – Butterflies (1978–1983, 2000)

1920s[edit]

  • BBC Wimbledon (1927–present)

1950s[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

Ending this year[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Date Name Age Cinematic Credibility
13 January Eric Dodson 79 actor
28 January Kenneth Waller 72 actor
20 April Bill Dean[180] 78 actor
24 April William Moore 84
30 May Doris Hare 95 actress
28 June Michael Ripper 87 actor
29 June John Abineri 72 actor
22 July Eric Christmas 84 actor
27 July Paddy Joyce 77
6 August Sir Robin Day[181] 74 political broadcaster and commentator
6 September Desmond Wilcox[182] 69 documentary maker and television producer
9 September Bill Waddington[183] 84 music hall performer, comedian and actor
17 September Paula Yates[184] 41 television presenter and writer
9 November Eric Morley[185] 82 Impresario and creator of the Miss World competition

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "News – Millennium". TVARK. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  2. ^ "2000 Today". BFI Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  3. ^ "Castaways prepare for bleak New Year". BBC News. BBC. 31 December 1999. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  4. ^ "Tearful Castaways head home". BBC News. BBC. 1 January 2001. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  5. ^ "Ali G's festive cheer". BBC News. BBC. 3 December 1999. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  6. ^ "Millennium TV smashes New Year records". BBC News. BBC. 2 January 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  7. ^ "Mandela's green-fingered makeover". BBC News. BBC. 14 December 1999. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  8. ^ "Guess who's back in town?". BBC News. BBC. 30 December 1999. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  9. ^ "Raquel's return to Corrie is a soap smash". Daily Record. Trinity Mirror. 5 January 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  10. ^ "Soaps lead TV's most watched for 2000". Broadcast. 1 January 2001. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  11. ^ "TV presenter to sue after acquittal". BBC News. BBC. 12 January 2000. Retrieved 18 January 2014.
  12. ^ "Gormenghast – BBC Two England – 17 January 2000 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  13. ^ Hall, Sarah (5 February 2000). "How BBC made a crisis out of drama". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  14. ^ "ITV in doghouse over 'frog' quip". BBC News. BBC. 18 January 2000. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
  15. ^ Gibson, Janine (19 January 2014). "Durham cricketers stump would-be millionaire". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  16. ^ "£1m question stumps quiz king". BBC News. BBC. 19 January 2000. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  17. ^ "EastEnder Danniella axed again". BBC News. BBC. 18 January 2000. Retrieved 25 May 2014.
  18. ^ "Actress Gabrielle swaps soaps". BBC News. BBC. 19 January 2000. Retrieved 14 March 2015.
  19. ^ "Westlife retain top spot". BBC News. BBC. 9 January 2000. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  20. ^ "New Crimewatch presenter takes Jill Dando's role". Coventry Evening Telegraph. Trinity Mirror. 25 January 2000. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  21. ^ Mulford, Sarah (20 January 2000). "Taking Jill job won't make me a target". Daily Record. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  22. ^ "Channel 4 rapped over Dando". BBC News. BBC. 27 January 2000. Retrieved 17 May 2014.
  23. ^ "Dinnerladies – BBC One London – 27 January 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 14 September 2018.
  24. ^ Sabbagh, Dan (20 April 2009). "Business big shot: Greg Dyke". London: Times Online. Retrieved 30 April 2009.
  25. ^ "EastEnders showdown". BBC News. BBC. 2 February 2000. Retrieved 31 March 2014.
  26. ^ "Back on song is just what the doctor ordered; Casualty receptionist Amy alias actress Rebecca Wheatley tells Olivia Convey about her return to singing. – Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  27. ^ Wells, Matt (8 February 2000). "Dyke rallies BBC with cut the crap yellow card". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  28. ^ "Street star Danson leaves". BBC News. BBC. 10 February 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  29. ^ "When Changing Rooms Met Ground Force – BBC One London – 12 February 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 4 May 2017.
  30. ^ "Gimme Some Truth – BBC Two England – 13 February 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  31. ^ "A Question of EastEnders – BBC One London – 15 February 2000". BBC Genome. Retrieved 4 May 2017.
  32. ^ "EastEnders' big knees-up; Stars gather for soap's 15th birthday bash". Sunday Mail. Trinity Mirror. 20 February 2000. Retrieved 3 May 2014.
  33. ^ "Hero to Zero – BBC One London – 23 February 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  34. ^ Gibson, Janine (24 February 2000). "Channel 5 swoop for £40m soap". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  35. ^ "Channel 5 'bags Home and Away'". BBC News. BBC. 24 February 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  36. ^ "Monarch Of The Glen – BBC One London – 27 February 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 23 February 2018.
  37. ^ "CFN and Cinema add hours". Broadcast. 25 February 2000. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  38. ^ McMullen, Marion (4 March 2000). "Heartbeat Hall Of Fame; The Many Celebrities Who Have Appeared In The Television Favourite Over The Show'S Nine-Year History". Coventry Evening Telegraph. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 28 May 2014.
  39. ^ "Soap Corrie's Bobbi dazzler". BBC News. BBC. 7 March 2000. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  40. ^ "ITV cuts Home And Away". BBC News. BBC. 15 March 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  41. ^ "Minister demanded Clockwork screening". BBC News. BBC. 14 March 2000. Retrieved 27 March 2016.
  42. ^ "Coral sees it like it is – and survives; Former actress Coral Atkins talks to Olivia Convey about a moving TV drama on her remarkable career working with disturbed children. – Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  43. ^ "Bring back News at Ten say MPs". BBC News. BBC. 22 March 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  44. ^ Palmer, Martyn; Maung, Carole Aye (25 March 2000). "The arrest shook me up..I realised drugs had stopped me living my life". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 3 May 2014.
  45. ^ "Doctors – BBC One London – 26 March 2000 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  46. ^ "BBC sets up Dando bursary". BBC News. BBC. 27 March 2000. Retrieved 23 March 2014.
  47. ^ "Channel 5 cleans up its act". BBC News. BBC. 28 March 2000. Retrieved 9 May 2014.
  48. ^ "Alford makes dramatic comeback". BBC News. BBC. 28 March 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  49. ^ "Watchdog attacks EastEnders". BBC News. BBC. 29 March 2000. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  50. ^ Wakefield, Jane (29 March 2000). "Chicken Tonight goes interactive". ZDNet. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  51. ^ Scott, James (14 April 2000). "The Mirror Pride of Britain Awards: Bigger than the BRIT Awards; 10million tune in to Pride of Britain". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  52. ^ "Ex-MI5 man appears on Have I Got News for You". Broadcast. 14 April 2000. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  53. ^ "Whistleblower calls the tune". BBC News. BBC. 21 August 2000. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  54. ^ "Vanessa researcher wins libel case". BBC News. BBC. 17 April 2000. Retrieved 28 June 2014.
  55. ^ "Ricky waves goodbye to Walford". BBC News. BBC. 20 April 2000. Retrieved 26 May 2015.
  56. ^ "Tarbuck to leave Big Breakfast". BBC News. BBC. 28 April 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  57. ^ Beattie, Jilly (1 May 2000). "Guinness gallops to top of ad poll". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  58. ^ "ITV Day of Promise". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 14 May 2009. Retrieved 26 April 2009.
  59. ^ Wells, Matt; Crerar, Pippa (30 March 2000). "Which millionaire? Stars line up to face Tarrant". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 April 2009.
  60. ^ "Street star Jim to leave". BBC News. BBC. 4 May 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  61. ^ "TV heavyweights appeal for News at Ten". BBC News. BBC. 13 May 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  62. ^ "ITV sent back to the drawing board". BBC News. BBC. 18 May 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  63. ^ "A kind of magic for Stars winner". BBC News. BBC. 21 May 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  64. ^ Lister, Mark (22 May 2000). "Freddie beat Big C; Op saved Stars In Their Eyes winner". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  65. ^ "Changing Rooms presenter jailed". BBC News. BBC. 22 May 2000. Retrieved 20 February 2014.
  66. ^ "TOTP2 – BBC Two England – 24 May 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  67. ^ "Bill cast clear-out". BBC News. BBC. 30 May 2000. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  68. ^ "thisisfive.co.uk – the story of five". www.thisisfive.co.uk. 2005. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  69. ^ "Vaughan quitting Big Breakfast". BBC News. BBC. 2 June 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  70. ^ Fulton, Rick (1 June 2000). "I'll never be a teenage mum like Sarah Louise; Pregnant pause: Corrie star Tina O'Brien vows that life will not imitate art". Daily Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  71. ^ "Naked Chegwin show sparks debate". BBC News. BBC. 8 June 2000. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  72. ^ "Channel 5 criticised in Commons". BBC News. BBC. 16 June 2000. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  73. ^ a b "Home and Away return date confirmed". Digital Spy. 22 May 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  74. ^ "Home and Away returns". BBC News. BBC. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  75. ^ Banks-Smith, Nancy (16 June 2000). "Favourite daughter". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  76. ^ "TOTP2 – BBC Two England – 15 June 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  77. ^ Perry, Keith (21 June 2000). "Power failure takes BBC news off air". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 30 June 2014.
  78. ^ "Crash documentary 'voyeuristic'". BBC News. BBC. 28 June 2000. Retrieved 17 May 2014.
  79. ^ "Emmerdale's Mandy to bow out". BBC News. BBC. 29 June 2000. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  80. ^ "C-Day widescreen transmission switch set for 1 July". Broadcast. 23 June 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  81. ^ "Emmerdale goes nightly". BBC News. BBC. 3 July 2000. Retrieved 3 April 2014.
  82. ^ "Veteran Bill star to leave". BBC News. BBC. 11 July 2000. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  83. ^ "Big Brother starts watching". BBC News. BBC. 14 July 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  84. ^ Brech, Poppy (13 July 2000). "ITV2 hires Springer for viewer reposition". Campaignlive.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  85. ^ "ITV ordered to move news". BBC News. BBC. 20 July 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  86. ^ "I Love the Seventies – BBC Two England – 22 July 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 7 July 2017.
  87. ^ "I Love the Seventies – BBC Two England – 23 September 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 7 July 2017.
  88. ^ "ITV launches court bid over news". BBC News. BBC. 27 July 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  89. ^ "Doctors – BBC One London – 28 July 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  90. ^ "Doctors – BBC One London – 1 September 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  91. ^ "Doctors – BBC One London – 7 September 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  92. ^ "ITN joins all-news battle". BBC News. BBC. 1 August 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  93. ^ "Liza's Big Breakfast tears". BBC News. BBC. 4 August 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  94. ^ "Van Outen's Breakfast return". BBC News. BBC. 4 August 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  95. ^ "BBC3 and BBC4 planned". BBC News. BBC. 6 August 2000. Retrieved 10 May 2014.
  96. ^ Rimella, Chiara; Cooper, Charlie (20 April 2014). "BBC2 at 50: The 50 facts you might not know". The Independent. Independent Print Limited. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  97. ^ "Dando award". Birmingham Evening Mail. Trinity Mirror. 16 August 2000. Retrieved 3 March 2014. (Subscription required (help)).
  98. ^ "Jill Dando Bursary". BBC Press Office. BBC. 9 August 2002. Retrieved 23 March 2014.
  99. ^ "Big Brother throws out 'Nasty Nick'". BBC News. BBC. 17 August 2000. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  100. ^ "BBC shifts Nine O'Clock News". BBC News. BBC. 25 August 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  101. ^ "Ringing in for a tilt at fame. – Free Online Library". Coventry Evening Telegraph. Trinity Mirror. 17 August 2000. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  102. ^ "BBC buys Spielberg war drama". BBC News. BBC. 28 August 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  103. ^ "Seven move in to Albert Square". BBC News. BBC. 30 August 2000. Retrieved 23 May 2015.
  104. ^ Wells, Matt (31 August 2000). "ITV fights back with old and new soaps". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  105. ^ "Eat my censors". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. 1 September 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  106. ^ "WALES | Teletubbies turn to wind power". BBC News. 2000-09-05. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  107. ^ "Street's love triangle boost". BBC News. BBC. 11 September 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  108. ^ Stewart, Tony (2 September 2000). "Soap box: The Rev's harsh lesson; This week Bible-bashing, brawls and a birthday bawl". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  109. ^ Teather, David (12 September 2000). "Granada buys 45% stake in Ireland's fast-growing TV3". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 11 April 2012.
  110. ^ Cozens, Claire (18 September 2000). "Media: Petrol crisis". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  111. ^ "Craig Charles to host Jailbreak". BBC News. BBC. 6 September 2000. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  112. ^ "Jailbreak trio escape". BBC News. BBC. 23 September 2000. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  113. ^ "Salmon leaps into BBC Sport". BBC News. BBC. 13 September 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  114. ^ "First woman to run BBC One". BBC News. BBC. 14 September 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  115. ^ "Craig wins Big Brother". BBC News. 15 September 2000. Archived from the original on 9 June 2009. Retrieved 26 April 2009.
  116. ^ Locke, Celia (13 September 2000). "Action station". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 May 2009.
  117. ^ "Nude game show 'in good taste'". BBC News. BBC. 18 September 2000. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  118. ^ "TOTP2 – BBC Two England – 20 September 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  119. ^ "ITV News at Ten returns". BBC News. BBC. 21 September 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  120. ^ "TOTP2 – BBC Two England – 27 September 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  121. ^ "BBC shows Dando concert". BBC News. BBC. 30 September 2000. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  122. ^ "A Song for Jill – BBC One London – 30 September 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk.
  123. ^ Rowland, Jacky (5 October 2000). "Exiled from Yugoslavia". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  124. ^ Grant, Tony, ed. (2005). "Jacky Rowland: Revolution in Belgrade, Serbia". From Our Own Correspondent: A Celebration of Fifty Years of the BBC Radio. Profile Books. p. 37.
  125. ^ "It's the return of the real Nasty Nick; Soap watch. – Free Online Library". Daily Record. Trinity Mirror. 30 September 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  126. ^ "Nick Cotton – in depth profile". BBC Press Office. BBC. 2 October 2008. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  127. ^ "EastEnders: Return of Nick Cotton – BBC One London – 1 October 2000 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  128. ^ "Blackadder ratings hit". Digital Spy. 3 October 2000. Retrieved 21 April 2014.
  129. ^ Welsh, James (22 September 2000). "QTV from October 2nd". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 15 June 2009. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  130. ^ "BBC news move to go ahead". BBC News. BBC. 3 October 2000. Retrieved 28 April 2014.
  131. ^ "BBC news move 'senseless'". BBC News. BBC. 3 October 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  132. ^ "Prince Charles talks 'bowels'". BBC News. BBC. 4 October 2000. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  133. ^ "Channel 4 comedy 'unacceptable'". BBC News. BBC. 4 October 2000. Retrieved 17 May 2014.
  134. ^ "Live & Kicking gets new look". BBC News. BBC. 8 September 2000. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  135. ^ Ronnie Flanagan (2000-10-09). "Programmes | Panorama | Archive | Who Bombed Omagh? October 9 2000". BBC News. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  136. ^ a b "Named Omagh 'suspect' in court". BBC News. 10 October 2000. Retrieved 8 November 2017.
  137. ^ "Omagh programme was 'media justice'". BBC News. 10 October 2000. Retrieved 8 November 2017.
  138. ^ "Ten O'Clock News tension". BBC News. 16 October 2001. Retrieved 30 March 2009.
  139. ^ "Meldrew leads BBC ratings charge". BBC News. BBC. 4 October 2000. Retrieved 15 March 2014.
  140. ^ "Parkinson's Saturday comeback". BBC News. BBC. 6 October 2000. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  141. ^ "Who wants to lose a fortune?". BBC News. BBC. 23 October 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  142. ^ Methven, Nicola (5 September 2000). "Baby for EastEnd Sonia, 16". The Mirror. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  143. ^ "Today's media stories from the papers". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. 26 October 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  144. ^ Hendry, Steve (10 March 2002). "I wouldn't want Sonia to be sexy; Cover story". Sunday Mail. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  145. ^ "Beckham plans to be world's best". BBC News. BBC. 27 October 2000. Retrieved 29 May 2014.
  146. ^ "Screen 'video nasty' hits Channel 4". BBC News. BBC. 16 October 2000. Archived from the original on 4 April 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2012.
  147. ^ Egan, Kate (2008). Trash or Treasure?: Censorship and the Changing Meanings of the Video Nasties (illustrated ed.). Manchester University Press. p. 243. ISBN 0-7190-7232-8.
  148. ^ "Weakest Link: Champions' League – BBC One London – 31 October 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 4 May 2017.
  149. ^ "BBC criticised for quiz cash". BBC News. BBC. 23 October 2000. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  150. ^ Jones, Ian (2 November 2000). "Countdown". Off The Telly. Retrieved 29 July 2014.
  151. ^ "Millionaire contestant wins £500,000". BBC News. BBC. 3 November 2000. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  152. ^ "Close encounters | Screen | The Observer". Theguardian.com. 2011-02-28. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  153. ^ Jason Deans. "Springer returns to British TV | Media". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  154. ^ "ENTERTAINMENT | Teletubbies head for Russia". BBC News. 2000-11-13. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  155. ^ "Morse's end draws 12 million". BBC News. BBC. 16 November 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  156. ^ "Blair and Hague set for TV clash". BBC News. BBC. 16 November 2000. Retrieved 31 March 2016.
  157. ^ "Children in Need raises £12m". BBC News. BBC. 18 November 2000. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  158. ^ Howlett, Paul; Hodgkinson, Will (17 November 2000). "Watch this". the Guardian. Retrieved 14 September 2018.
  159. ^ "Millionaire? cleared of ratings 'fix'". BBC News. 15 January 2001. Retrieved 26 April 2009.
  160. ^ "TV challenge for party leaders". BBC News. BBC. 23 November 2000. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  161. ^ "Blair's 'blue funk' over TV debate". BBC News. BBC. 18 January 2001. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  162. ^ O'Carroll, Lisa; Davies, Ashley (9 May 2001). "BBC clears schedules for election coverage". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  163. ^ "ITV announces election plans". Digital Spy. 2 April 2001. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  164. ^ "Alma to leave the Street". BBC News. BBC. 23 November 2000. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  165. ^ "Cameras roll on Crossroads remake". BBC News. BBC. 28 November 2000. Retrieved 28 June 2014.
  166. ^ "BBC says sorry in ratings row". BBC News. BBC. 1 December 2000. Retrieved 29 June 2014.
  167. ^ "Stars win for opera diva". BBC News. BBC. 3 December 2000. Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  168. ^ "Prince stars in live soap". bbc.co.uk. 8 December 2000. Retrieved 29 March 2009.
  169. ^ "Freddie Mercury: the Untold Story – BBC One London – 8 December 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  170. ^ "Westlife win Record of the Year". BBC News. BBC. 10 December 2000. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  171. ^ "Redgrave voted Britain's best". BBC. BBC Sport. 10 December 2000. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  172. ^ "Rugged prince scores PR triumph". BBC News. BBC. 11 December 2000. Retrieved 28 May 2014.
  173. ^ "TV watchdog raps vampire series". BBC News. BBC. 11 December 2000. Retrieved 3 May 2014.
  174. ^ "Single watchdog for broadcasters". BBC News. BBC. 12 December 2000. Retrieved 3 May 2014.
  175. ^ "Bob the Builder makes number one". BBC News. BBC. 17 December 2000. Retrieved 25 March 2016.
  176. ^ "C5 porn reviews 'unacceptable'". BBC News. BBC. 21 December 2000. Retrieved 3 May 2014.
  177. ^ "Street wins festive ratings fight". BBC News. BBC. 26 December 2000. Retrieved 29 June 2014.
  178. ^ "Celebrity Robot Wars – BBC One London – 27 December 2000". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  179. ^ Young, Graham (27 December 2000). "No stranger this night!". Birmingham Evening Mail. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 28 May 2014 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)).
  180. ^ "Brookside favourite dies". BBC News. 21 April 2000. Retrieved 25 April 2009.
  181. ^ "Tributes to Sir Robin Day". BBC News. 8 August 2000. Retrieved 25 April 2009.
  182. ^ "Broadcaster Desmond Wilcox dies". BBC News. 6 September 2000. Retrieved 25 April 2009.
  183. ^ "Former Street star dies". BBC News. 9 September 2000. Retrieved 11 April 2009.
  184. ^ "Paula Yates found dead". BBC News. 17 September 2000. Retrieved 25 April 2009.
  185. ^ "Miss World founder dies". BBC News. 9 November 2000. Retrieved 25 April 2009.