2001 Central African Republic coup d'état attempt

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2001 Central African Republic coup d'état attempt
Location Central African Republic AU Africa.svg
Date27–28 May- mid-June, 2001
Location
Result

Coup fails

Belligerents
Central African Republic Government of Central African Republic,
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 100 Libyan troops[1]
Chad Chadian troops[2]
Congolese Rebels[3]
Army faction
Casualties and losses
At least 59 killed in initial coup attempt.[5]
Around 300 Yakoma civilians murdered following coup[6]

On the night of 27–28 May 2001 a coup attempt was carried out by commando forces of the Central African Armed Forces who attempted to overthrow Ange-Félix Patassé. The coup attempt failed but violence continued in the capital over the following days.[7]

The coup was sponsored by André Kolingba and had the effect of dividing the country's armed forces into two opposing camps: one that supported Ange-Félix Patassé and the other that supported François Bozizé.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ International Crisis Group. "Central African Republic: Anatomy of a Phantom State" (PDF). CrisisGroup.org. International Crisis Group. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  2. ^ BBC. "Central African Republic profile - Timeline". BBC. Retrieved 26 July 2015.
  3. ^ BBC. "Central African Republic profile - Timeline". BBC. Retrieved 26 July 2015.
  4. ^ International Crisis Group. "Central African Republic: Anatomy of a Phantom State" (PDF). CrisisGroup.org. International Crisis Group. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  5. ^ BBC. "Central African Republic profile - Timeline". BBC. Retrieved 26 July 2015.
  6. ^ International Crisis Group. "Central African Republic: Anatomy of a Phantom State" (PDF). CrisisGroup.org. International Crisis Group. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  7. ^ International Crisis Group. "Central African Republic: Anatomy of a Phantom State" (PDF). CrisisGroup.org. International Crisis Group. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  8. ^ http://www.occupy.com/article/colonialism-coups-and-conflict-understanding-todays-violence-central-african-republic