2001 Washington Huskies football team

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2001 Washington Huskies football
University of Washington Block W logo.svg
Holiday Bowl, L 43–47 vs. Texas
Conference Pacific-10
Ranking
Coaches No. 19
AP No. 19
2001 record 8–4 (6–2 Pac-10)
Head coach Rick Neuheisel (3rd year)
Offensive coordinator Keith Gilbertson (2nd year)
Defensive coordinator Tim Hundley (3rd year)
MVP Willie Hurst (O)
MVP Ben Mahdavi (D)
Captain Kyle Benn
Captain Willie Hurst
Captain Larry Tripplett
Home stadium Husky Stadium
Seasons
« 2000 2002 »
2001 Pacific-10 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#2 Oregon $   7 1         11 1  
#10 Washington State   6 2         10 2  
#16 Stanford   6 2         9 3  
#19 Washington   6 2         8 4  
USC   5 3         6 6  
UCLA   4 4         7 4  
Oregon State   3 5         5 6  
Arizona   2 6         5 6  
Arizona State   1 7         4 7  
California   0 8         1 10  
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 2001 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its third season under head coach Rick Neuheisel, the team compiled an 8-4 record, finished in a three-way tie for second place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 370 to 353.[1] Willie Hurst and Ben Mahdavi were selected as the team's most valuable player offensive and defensive players, respectively.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 8 12:30 PM No. 11 Michigan* No. 15 Husky StadiumSeattle, WA ABC W 23–18   74,080
September 22 12:30 PM Idaho* No. 13 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA FSN W 53–3   70,145
September 29 2:00 PM at California No. 13 California Memorial StadiumBerkeley, CA FSN W 31–28   35,172
October 6 12:30 PM USC No. 11 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA FSN W 27–24   72,946
October 13 12:30 PM at No. 7 UCLA No. 10 Rose BowlPasadena, CA ABC L 13–35   70,377
October 20 3:30 PM Arizona No. 15 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA FSN W 31–28   71,108
October 27 6:15 PM at Arizona State No. 13 Sun Devil StadiumTempe, AZ FSN W 33–31   50,106
November 3 12:30 PM No. 10 Stanford No. 11 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA FSN W 42–28   72,090
November 10 12:30 PM at Oregon State No. 8 Reser StadiumCorvallis, OR FSN L 24–49   36,682
November 17 12:30 PM No. 9 Washington State No. 16 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA (Apple Cup) ABC W 26–14   74,442
November 24 5:00 PM at No. 1 Miami* No. 12 Orange BowlMiami, FL ABC L  7–65   78,114
December 28 7:30 PM vs. No. 9 Texas* No. 21 Qualcomm StadiumSan Diego, CA (Holiday Bowl) ESPN L 43–47   60,548
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Pacific Time.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Washington Yearly Results (2000–2004)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved December 15, 2015. 
  2. ^ Clark, Bob (November 13, 2002). "Time turns down rivalry's heat". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C. 
  3. ^ Clark, Bob (November 16, 2002). "Northwest rivalry resumes, no love lost". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1D. 
  4. ^ Rosenblatt, Richard (September 16, 2011). "NCAA weighing options". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. p. 1G. 

External links[edit]