2002 Euler

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2002 Euler
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered by T. Smirnova
Discovery site CrAO (Nauchnyj)
Discovery date 29 August 1973
Designations
MPC designation 2002 Euler
Named after
Leonhard Euler[3]
1973 QQ1 · 1938 DW
1942 GJ · 1953 EB
1973 SJ2
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1][4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 73.91 yr (26994 days)
Aphelion 2.5838 AU (386.53 Gm)
Perihelion 2.2503 AU (336.64 Gm)
2.4170 AU (361.58 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.069001
3.76 yr (1372.5 d)
19.13 km/s
202.45°
0° 15m 44.244s / day
Inclination 8.5026°
178.65°
53.856°
Earth MOID 1.2519 AU (187.28 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.40185 AU (359.312 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.498
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 17.4 km
Mean radius
8.72 ± 0.7 km
Mass 5.5×1015 kg
Mean density
2.0 g/cm³[citation needed]
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0049 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0092 km/s
5.9929 h (0.24970 d)
9.9929 d
0.0839 ± 0.015
Temperature ~ 179 K[citation needed]
12.4

2002 Euler, provisional designation 1973 QQ1, is an asteroid from the asteroid belt, about 17 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on August 29, 1973, by Russian astronomer Tamara Smirnova at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj. The asteroid's low-eccentric, only slightly inclined orbit has a period of 3 years and 9 month with a semi-major axis of 2.4 AU. It rotates around its axis every 6 hours. Its geometric albedo of 0.084 has been measured by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS).[1][4]

It was named after Swiss mathematician, physicist and astronomer Leonhard Euler (1707–1783). His contributions to astronomy included two theories for the motion of the Moon. Euler spent much of his time in St. Petersburg and was associated with the Russian Academy of Sciences.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2002 Euler (1973 QQ1)" (2015-09-20 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU–Minor Planet Center. 1 September 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2002) Euler. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 162. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". Lowell Observatory. 2 September 2015. 

External links[edit]