(89959) 2002 NT7

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(89959) 2002 NT7
Discovery [1]
Discovered byLINEAR
Discovery siteLincoln Lab's ETS
Discovery date9 July 2002
Designations
MPC designation(89959) 2002 NT7
2002 NT7
Apollo · NEO · PHA[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc62.68 yr (22,894 days)
Aphelion2.6529 AU
Perihelion0.8180 AU
1.7355 AU
Eccentricity0.5286
2.29 yr (835 days)
79.375°
0° 25m 51.96s / day
Inclination42.333°
132.08°
300.67°
Earth MOID0.0004 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions1.407±0.085 km[3]
0.224±0.053[3]
16.4[1]

(89959) 2002 NT7, provisional designation 2002 NT7, is a near-Earth object with a diameter of 1.4 kilometers and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group.[1][2]

Description[edit]

2002 NT7 became the first object observed by NASA's NEO program to be assigned a positive rating on both the Torino Scale and the Palermo Technical Impact Hazard Scale, for a small chance of an impact on February 1, 2019, although it is now predicted to miss the Earth by just 60,000,000 km (37,000,000 mi). It was discovered on July 9, 2002, by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research team (LINEAR) at the U.S. Lincoln Laboratory Experimental Test Site near Socorro, New Mexico.[2]

Despite inflammatory press reports, the object had a "low probability" of impact of approximately one in a million.[4] Further observations of the object quickly lowered the probability. On July 25, 2002, the hazard rating on the Palermo scale was lowered to -0.25. However, the discovery of the object with a Palermo initial rating of 0.06[5] was a historical event for the NEO observation program.

2002 NT7 was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on August 1, 2002, so there is no risk of an impact by it in the next 100 years.[6] On January 13, 2019, the asteroid safely passed 0.4078 AU (61,010,000 km; 37,910,000 mi) from Earth.[7]

On January 30, 2020, the asteroid will pass 0.02718 AU (4,066,000 km; 2,527,000 mi) from 2 Pallas.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 89959 (2002 NT7)" (2017-03-15 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "89959 (2002 NT7)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  4. ^ Asteroid 2002 NT7 Under Watch, But Probably Not Coming Our Way Archived 2006-04-05 at the Wayback Machine (25 July 2002)
  5. ^ "Space rock 'on collision course'". BBC News. 24 July 2002. Retrieved 2007-12-28.
  6. ^ "Date/Time Removed". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 2011-05-06.
  7. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 89959 (2002 NT7)" (last observation: 2011-09-12; arc: 57 years). Retrieved 2011-11-04.
  8. ^ "NEODyS-2 Close Approaches for (89959) 2002NT7". Near Earth Objects - Dynamic Site. Retrieved 2011-11-05.

External links[edit]