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2002 World Snooker Championship

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2002 Embassy World Snooker Championship
Tournament information
Dates20 April – 6 May 2002
VenueCrucible Theatre
CitySheffield
CountryEngland
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£1,615,770
Winner's share£260,000
Highest break Matthew Stevens (WAL) (145)
Final
Champion Peter Ebdon (ENG)
Runner-up Stephen Hendry (SCO)
Score18–17
2001
2003

The 2002 World Snooker Championship (also referred to as the 2002 Embassy World Snooker Championship for the purposes of sponsorship) was a professional snooker tournament that took place from 20 April to 6 May 2002 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. It was the final ranking event of the 2001–02 snooker season. This was the 26th consecutive year that the World Snooker Championship had been held at the Crucible, marking the 25th anniversary of the first staging of the event at this venue. The championships were sponsored by cigarette manufacturer Embassy.

Peter Ebdon won his first world title by defeating seven-time winner Stephen Hendry 18–17 in the final. Ebdon defeated Matthew Stevens 17–16 in the semi-finals, while Hendry defeated the defending champion Ronnie O'Sullivan 17–13 to reach the final. This was Hendry's ninth and last appearance in a World Championship final. There was a total of 65 century breaks made during the tournament. The highest of the tournament was made by Stevens, who made a 145 in his quarter-final match. Hendry made a total of 16 centuries during the event, a record for any individual tournament. A total prize fund of £1,615,770 was awarded at the event, with the winner receiving £260,000

Overview[edit]

The World Snooker Championship is a professional tournament and the official world championship of the game of snooker.[1] Founded in the late 19th century by British Army soldiers stationed in India,[2] the sport was popular in the British Isles.[3] However, in the modern era it has become increasingly popular worldwide, especially in East and Southeast Asian nations such as China, Hong Kong and Thailand.[a][3][5][6]

The championship featured 32 professional players competing in one-on-one snooker matches in a single elimination format, each played over several frames. The 32 competitors in the main tournament were selected using a combination of the top players in the world snooker rankings and a pre-tournament qualification stage.[7] Joe Davis won the first World Championship in 1927, the final match being held in Camkin's Hall, Birmingham, England.[8][9] Since 1977, the event has been held in the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.[10][11]

Format[edit]

The championship was held from 20 April and 6 May 2002 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England, the 25th consecutive time that the tournament was held at the venue.[11] It was the ninth and last ranking event of the 2001–02 snooker season on the World Snooker Tour.[12][13][14] There were a total of 120 entrants from the tour, and the competition's main draw had 32 participants.[15] Following a seven-round amateur qualifying tournament, a six-round knockout qualifying competition was held at Manhattan Club, Harrogate and the Telford International Centre. This qualifying tournament produced the 16 qualifying players who progressed into the main draw to play the top 16 seeds.[16]

The top 16 players in the latest world rankings automatically qualified for the main draw as seeded players. As defending champion, Ronnie O'Sullivan was seeded first for the event with world number one Mark Williams seeded 2; the remaining seeds were allocated based on the players' world ranking positions.[17] Matches in the first round of the main draw were played as best-of-19-frames. The number of frames needed to win a match increased to 13 in the second round and quarter-finals, and 17 in the semi-finals; the final match was played as best-of-35-frames.[15]

Prize fund[edit]

The tournament featured a prize fund of £1,615,770 with the winner receiving £260,000. The breakdown of prize money for the event is shown below:[18][19]

  • Winner: £260,000
  • Runner-up: £152,000
  • Semi-final: £76,000
  • Quarter-final: £38,000
  • Last 16: £21,000
  • Last 32: £14,500
  • Last 48: £11,000
  • Last 64: £6,825
  • Last 80: £5,500
  • Last 96: £4,150
  • Last 128: £1,185
  • Stage one highest break: £2,250
  • Stage two highest break: £20,000
  • Stage one maximum break: £5,000
  • Stage two maximum break: £147,000
  • Total: £1,615,770

Tournament summary[edit]

First round[edit]

Dominic Dale playing a shot with a rest
Dominic Dale snapped his cue after his loss to Jimmy White

The first round was played as the best-of-19 frames matches, played over two sessions. The defending champion Ronnie O'Sullivan's opening match against Drew Henry was delayed for 25 minutes due to a problem with the scoreboard. The first six frames were shared, but from 3–3 O'Sullivan won six in a row to lead 9–3, and won the match at 10–5.[20] Quinten Hann became the first Australian player to reach the second round since Eddie Charlton in 1989. Hann, a WEPF World Eight-ball championship winner, had smashed the pack of reds open when breaking off in the fifth frame, from which Paul Hunter made a 77 break and took the frame. Hunter was 6–3 ahead after their first session, but Hann won the match 10–9.[21] Seven-time winner Stephen Hendry recorded a break of 130 in frame three of his match with Shaun Murphy and lead 6–3 at the end of their first session, and won the last frame with a break of 111 as he won 10–4.[22][23][24] Stuart Bingham narrowly missed out on a maximum break during his match against Ken Doherty, failing to pot the final pink ball. Doherty later won the match 10–8.[25][26]

James Wattana won only one frame of his match against John Higgins. Higgins made breaks of 109, 136 and 116 in winning 10–1.[27] Peter Ebdon led Michael Judge 5–4 at the end of their first session then took five frames in-a-row to win 10–4.[28] Dominic Dale, who had been ill with food poisoning in the days before his match with Jimmy White, accused White of making a push shot,[29] pretended to go to sleep in his chair during the final frame, and after losing 2–10, snapped his cue and threw it out of his dressing-room window.[30][31] This and the match between Hunter and Hann was interrupted by a streaker wearing a Sven-Göran Eriksson mask.[22][24][32]

Second round[edit]

Ronnie O'Sullivan chalking a cue stick
Defending champion Ronnie O'Sullivan won his second round match with a session to spare

The second round featured matches played as the best-of-25 frames held over up to three sessions. O'Sullivan defeated Robert Milkins 13–2 in just two sessions. When the third session was scheduled to be played O'Sullivan visited a chiropractor.[33] O'Sullivan said "I've got an imbalance in my body and I find it hard to walk, among other things."[33] Hann smashed the pack of reds on the break-off shot four times during his 3–13 loss to Stephen Lee.[34] Lee commented after the match "I don't know why Quinten plays like that... perhaps he actually wants to go home early?"[34] Qualifier Anthony Davies trailed 2–6 after the first session, and won just one frame in the second session and was defeated 3–13 by Stephen Hendry.[35] Doherty won eight frames in-a-row to go from 3–7 behind to 11–7 ahead against Mark King. King forced the match to a decider, which was won by Doherty 13–12.[36] Higgins notched up five century breaks and defeated Graeme Dott 13–2.[37] Peter Ebdon and Joe Perry shared the frames in their first session and tied 4–4. However, Ebdon won seven of the next eight frames to lead 11–5 after the second session, and later won 13–7.[24][38]

Jimmy White played Matthew Stevens and lost 3–13 with a session to spare.[39] In the eight frame, the final frame in the first session, White had missed a pot on the black ball, and as the cue ball returned towards him, hit it with such force that both balls were both forced off the table.[39] This was particularly unexpected given White's reputation for good sportsmanship. He issued an apology before resuming play the following day.[24][40] World number one Mark Williams was defeated 9–13 by world number 19 Anthony Hamilton.[41] Hamilton had been defeated by Williams in the final of the China Open earlier in the season, said that the previous match spurred him to victory. Williams commented that despite being ranked number one in the world, his performances were not good enough: "I'm sick with the way I performed. I don't enjoy playing that bad but I seem to play like that fairly often. I don't know what it is."[42]

Quarter-finals[edit]

Matthew Stevens playing a shot
Matthew Stevens reached his third semi-final in-a-row with a 13–7 win over John Higgins

The quarter-finals were played as best-of-25 frames matches, held over three sessions. Having been level at 10–10 with Stephen Lee, O'Sullivan made breaks of 83, 102 and 113 win the match 13–10.[43] Stephen Hendry and Ken Doherty were tied after the first session, with Hendry winning four frames in-a-row to lead 8–4, but Doherty won the next four to tie at 8–8.[44] With the match also tied at 12-12, Hendry made a break of 91 to win 13–12.[44] Post-match, Hendry commented: "Ken and I always have brilliant matches, but this one was special".[44]

John Higgins, who had only conceded three frames in his previous two matches trailed 0–3 to Matthew Stephens in the quarter-finals.[45] Higgins won four frames in a row, before Stevens tied the match at 4–4 in the first session. Matthew Stevens made the highest break of the championship, a 145 in frame 11, and held a four frame lead after the second session.[18] Stevens won three of the next four frames to win 13–7 and reach his third successive semi-final.[45] Peter Ebdon reached the semi-finals for the second time, as he beat Hamilton 13–6.[24][46]

Semi-finals[edit]

Stephen Hendry playing a shot
Stephen Hendry defeated the defending champion Ronnie O'Sullivan to reach his ninth final

The semi-finals were played as best-of-33 frames matches, held over four sessions between 3 and 4 May.[15] Before the match between Ronnie O'Sullivan and Stephen Hendry, O'Sullivan made comments due to a dispute from a previous event.[47] He commented "the most satisfying thing for me to send Stephen Hendry back home to Scotland",[43] and that "there is not a lot of respect there at all".[47] He also made comments about Hendry's manager Ian Doyle, who was a previous manager to O'Sullivan.[48] John Dee for the Daily Telegraph commented that O'Sullivan had "blown hot and cold" during interviews, and the comments surprised him.[49]

O'Sullivan experienced the crucible curse as he lost 13–17 to Hendry. O'Sullivan had started the match with a break of 115 in the opening frame and led 5–3 at the end of the first session. In the second session, Hendry moved into a 9–7 lead, with breaks of 125, 122 and 124. The third session ended with the players tied at 12–12. In the final session Hendry took a 16–12 lead and ended up winning 17–13.[24]

In the other semi-final, Ebdon led Stevens 5–3 after the first session and then 9–7 after the second. It was all square after the third, at 12–12. Stevens, however moved within one frame of victory at 16–14. In frame 31, leading by 33 points, with 35 points remaining, Stevens lost position, and Ebdon cleared the table to win the frame.[50] Ebdon made a 138 in the penultimate frame and won a deciding frame with a break of 55 to win the match 17–16.[24][51] After the match, Ebdon commented that he "can't believe he won", and that he felt "sorry" for Stevens, because he knew "how he feels right now".[50]

Final[edit]

Peter Ebdon playing a shot
Peter Ebdon won his only world championship, defeating Hendry 18–17

The final held between Peter Ebdon and Stephen Hendry was played as a best-of-35 frames match over four sessions on 5 and 6 May. Ebdon (seeded seventh) and Stephen Hendry (fifth) also competed in the 1996 final. Hendry had defeated Ebdon 18–12 to gain his sixth world title in 1996.[52] Over eight million viewers watched the 2002 final in the expectation of Hendry winning his eighth world title.[41][53] The final was refereed by John Williams, his tenth final.[54]

Ebdon took the first four frames of the match to lead 4–0 at the first mid-session interval, but Hendry pulled back the next four frames to end the first session tied at 4–4. By the end of the second session, Ebdon was again four frames ahead at 10–6, but Hendry fought back and levelled the score at the end of the third session, 12–12.[53][55]

Hendry made a strong start to the final session, taking the lead for the first time with breaks of 63, 55 and 38, to put him 14–12 ahead. Ebdon won the next two frames to draw level at 14–14, after Hendry missed a relatively simple red in the 28th frame. Hendry then compiled a break of 58 in frame 29, to lead 15–14, but Ebdon took three of the next four frames with breaks of 73, 111 and 85 to move ahead 17–16.[53][55] Poised to win the championship, Ebdon was 52–27 up in frame 34 when he missed a straight pot on the black on its spot, allowing Hendry to clear the colours and level the match at 17–17.[41][56]

This was the second time that Hendry had been taken to a deciding frame in the World Championship final,[53] having also have done so in 1994 when he defeated Jimmy White 18–17.[57] Hendry was the first to score in the decider, just seven points, before Ebdon compiled a break of 59.[41][53] Then with just four reds remaining on the table,[56] Hendry potted the cue ball while attempting to play a snooker, giving Ebdon his chance to take the frame and win the match 18–17.[41][57]

With his win, Ebdon received a cheque for £260,000 and moved up to third place in the end-of-season world rankings (behind Ronnie O'Sullivan and Mark Williams).[56][57] In a post-match interview, he said "It's what I have been working for and dreaming about for the last 17 years... I wasn't ready to win it six years ago, but I've improved as a player and as a person".[56] The Guardian's Sean Ingle described the final as "one of the sporting highlights of the year."[55] Many commentators had been expecting Hendry to take his eighth world title.[55] He ultimately blamed his defeat on nerves and poor concentration, but also conceded that Ebdon was a stronger player than he had been in their previous world final encounter in 1996.[57] This was Hendry's last appearance in a World Championship final. His defeat effectively signalled the start of his decline as a major force in the game of snooker; he reached his last ranking final four years later at the 2006 UK Championship, where he again lost to Peter Ebdon.[58] This was the first time a player had won both their semi-final and final match on a deciding frame.[52]

Main draw[edit]

Shown below are the results for each round. The numbers in parentheses beside some of the players are their seeding ranks.[15][18][17] Players in bold denote match winners:

First round Second round Quarter-finals Semi-finals
Best of 19 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 33 frames
                           
20 April[59]            
 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (1)  10
25 & 26 April[60]
 Scotland Drew Henry  5  
 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (1)  13
24 April[61]
   England Robert Milkins  2  
 Republic of Ireland Fergal O'Brien (16)  8
30 April & 1 May[62]
 England Robert Milkins  10  
 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (1)  13
23 April[63]
   England Stephen Lee (8)  10  
 England Paul Hunter (9)  9
28 & 29 April[64]
 Australia Quinten Hann  10  
 Australia Quinten Hann  3
22 & 23 April[65]
   England Stephen Lee (8)  13  
 England Stephen Lee (8)  10
2, 3 & 4 May[66]
 Scotland Chris Small  7  
 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (1)  13
21 & 22 April[67]
   Scotland Stephen Hendry (5)  17
 Scotland Stephen Hendry (5)  10
27 & 28 April[68]
 England Shaun Murphy  4  
 Scotland Stephen Hendry (5)  13
24 & 25 April[69]
   Wales Anthony Davies  3  
 Scotland Alan McManus (12)  7
30 April & 1 May[44]
 Wales Anthony Davies  10  
 Scotland Stephen Hendry (5)  13
20 & 21 April[70]
   Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty (4)  12  
 England Mark King (13)  10
26 & 27 April[71]
 England David Gray  5  
 England Mark King (13)  12
21 & 22 April[72]
   Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty (4)  13  
 Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty (4)  10
 England Stuart Bingham  8  
24 & 25 April[73]            
 Scotland John Higgins (3)  10
28 & 29 April[74]
 Thailand James Wattana  1  
 Scotland John Higgins (3)  13
20 & 21 April[75]
   Scotland Graeme Dott (14)  2  
 Scotland Graeme Dott (14)  10
30 April & 1 May[45]
 Finland Robin Hull  6  
 Scotland John Higgins (3)  7
22 & 23 April[76]
   Wales Matthew Stevens (6)  13  
 England Jimmy White (11)  10
25 & 26 April[77]
 Wales Dominic Dale  2  
 England Jimmy White (11)  3
20 & 21 April[78]
   Wales Matthew Stevens (6)  13  
 Wales Matthew Stevens (6)  10
2, 3 & 4 May[79]
 England Mike Dunn  6  
 Wales Matthew Stevens (6)  16
22 April[80]
   England Peter Ebdon (7)  17
 England Peter Ebdon (7)  10
26 & 27 April[81]
 Republic of Ireland Michael Judge  4  
 England Peter Ebdon (7)  13
20 & 21 April[82]
   England Joe Perry  7  
 Northern Ireland Joe Swail (10)  6
30 April & 1 May[83]
 England Joe Perry  10  
 England Peter Ebdon (7)  13
23 & 24 April[84]
   England Anthony Hamilton  6  
 England Dave Harold (15)  6
27, 28 & 29 April[85]
 England Anthony Hamilton  10  
 England Anthony Hamilton  13
23 & 24 April[86]
   Wales Mark Williams (2)  9  
 Wales Mark Williams (2)  10
 England John Parrott  7  
Final (Best of 35 frames) Crucible Theatre, Sheffield. 5 & 6 May.[87] Referee: John Williams.[88]
Stephen Hendry (5)
 Scotland
17–18 Peter Ebdon (7)
 England
0–94, 0–140, 13–73, 16–71, 126–0, 73–40, 119–4, 65–36, 0–134, 67–56, 9–68, 68–70, 14–77, 13–69, 70–4, 33–89, 32–69, 126–0, 108–0, 66–21, 89–36, 43–67, 110–0, 97–0, 127–1, 65–58, 22–103, 26–62, 74–30, 21–73, 0–111, 78–39, 4–85, 62–52, 14–72 Century breaks: 8
(Hendry 4, Ebdon 4)

Highest break by Hendry: 126
Highest break by Ebdon: 134

0–94, 0–140, 13–73, 16–71, 126–0, 73–40, 119–4, 65–36, 0–134, 67–56, 9–68, 68–70, 14–77, 13–69, 70–4, 33–89, 32–69, 126–0, 108–0, 66–21, 89–36, 43–67, 110–0, 97–0, 127–1, 65–58, 22–103, 26–62, 74–30, 21–73, 0–111, 78–39, 4–85, 62–52, 14–72
England Peter Ebdon wins the 2002 Embassy World Snooker Championship

Qualifying[edit]

Following amateur pre-qualifying, seven rounds of qualifying were played at the Manhattan Club, Harrogate. After Harrogate there were a further five rounds of qualifying at Telford International Centre. The final qualifying round was held at Newport on 16 and 17 March 2002.[16]

Amateur qualifying[edit]

Willie Thorne, in his 27th world championship, lost in the seventh round to Stephen Croft.[89] Thorne was the only entrant in the qualifiers to have played at the first Crucible finals in 1977.[16] Three-times semi-finalist Tony Knowles lost 3–5 to Rob James in the third round. During her fifth-round defeat, Kelly Fisher became the first female player to compile a century break at the open World Championship, making a 106.[89]

Round 7 (Best of 9 frames)[16]
England Darren Clarke 5–2 England Craig Harrison
Wales Ryan Day 5–3 England Karl Broughton
England Joe Jogia 5–0 England Shaun Mellish
Wales James Reynolds 5–1 England Malcolm Bilclough
England Jason Weston 5–1 Wales Tony Chappel
England Lee Spick 5–2 England John Whitty
England Martin Gould 5–2 England David Gilbert
England Stephen Croft 5–3 England Willie Thorne

Round 1[edit]

The first round of qualifying took place in Telford as best-of-19 frames matches.[90]

Best of 19 frames
England Darren Clarke 10–9 England Brian Salmon
Wales Ryan Day 10–5 England Ryan Michael
England Joe Jogia 10–3 England Wayne Cooper
Wales James Reynolds 10–9 Australia Neil Robertson
England Jason Weston 10–1 Wales Edward Davies
England Lee Spick 10–5 Thailand Atthasit Mahitthi
England Craig Butler 10–7 England Martin Gould
England Stephen Croft 10–9 England Sunit Vaswani

Round 2[edit]

There were 32 players eliminated in the second round of qualifying. 1986 Champion Joe Johnson was 4–1 ahead of Ricky Walden but then lost a contact lens and, with impaired vision, ended the first session 4–5 behind. He went on to win 10–5.[90]

Last 128 (best of 19 frames)
England Paul Wykes 10–4 England Darren Clarke England Matthew Street 10–9 England Troy Shaw
England Barry Hawkins 10–8 England Luke Fisher England Nick Pearce 10–8 Thailand Noppadol Sangnil
Wales Ryan Day 10–3 Thailand Phaitoon Phonbun England Joe Johnson 10–5 England Ricky Walden
England Andrew Higginson 10–5 England Adrian Rosa England Nick Walker 10–0 Canada Levi Meilleur
Northern Ireland Jason Prince 10–7 England Chris Melling England Wayne Brown 10–6 England Joe Jogia
Wales James Reynolds 10–9 England Tony Jones England Jeff Cundy 10–7 Norway Kurt Maflin
England Paul Davison 10–6 Scotland Hugh Abernethy England Antony Bolsover w/o–w/d Germany Steve Lemmens
Scotland Martin Dziewaltowski 10–9 Thailand Kwan Poomjang England Andrew Norman 10–5 Thailand Noppadon Noppachorn
England Jason Wallace 10–6 Canada Alain Robidoux England Jason Weston 10–8 England Mark Gray
England Stephen Kershaw 10–8 England Sean Storey England Lee Spick 10–7 Wales Philip Williams
England Matthew Couch 10–1 New Zealand Chris McBreen Iceland Kristjan Helgason 10–7 England Surinder Gill
Finland Robin Hull 10–2 England Craig Butler England Neal Foulds 10–4 Malta Alex Borg
England Mike Dunn 10–2 England Stephen Croft Republic of Ireland David McDonnell 10–4 England Ian Hurdman
England Mark Selby 10–9 England Tom Ford Germany Bjorn Haneveer 10–5 Wales Ian Sargeant
England Shaun Murphy 10–5 Scotland Euan Henderson England Adrian Gunnell 10–6 England Rory McLeod
England Barry Pinches 10–3 England Eddie Barker England Luke Simmonds 10–6 England John Read

Round 3–6[edit]

There were 16 players eliminated in each of rounds 3 to 6 of qualifying.[18] Joe Johnson experienced problems with his vision, as he had in the previous round, and retired from his third round match against Ryan Day when 1–5 behind.[91] The final qualifying round saw John Parrott qualify for the Crucible stage for the 19the consecutive year, whilst six-times former champion Steve Davis failed to reach the Crucible for only the second time in 24 seasons. Shaun Murphy, ranked 169th and aged 19, was both the lowest-ranked and youngest player to reach the final stages in 2002.[92]

Round 3 (last 96)[91]
(Best of 19 frames)
Round 4 (last 80)[91]
(Best of 19 frames)
Round 5 (last 64)[93](Best of 19 frames) Final qualifying round (last 48)[92]
(Best of 19 frames)
Iceland Kristján Helgason 10–9 England Matthew Couch Iceland Kristján Helgason 10–5 England Rod Lawler England Stuart Bingham 10–7 Iceland Kristján Helgason England Stuart Bingham 10–6 England Nigel Bond
England Paul Wykes 10–5 England Matthew Street England Paul Wykes 10–4 England Peter Lines England Paul Wykes 10–8 England Bradley Jones Wales Dominic Dale 10–5 England Paul Wykes
Wales Ryan Day 5–1 England Joe Johnson(Johnson retired) Wales Ryan Day 10–8 England Mark Davis Scotland Marcus Campbell 10–9 Wales Ryan Day Wales Anthony Davies 10–9 Scotland Marcus Campbell
England Mike Dunn 10–8 Republic of Ireland David McDonnell England Mike Dunn 10–2 Wales Lee Walker England Mike Dunn 10–5 England David Finbow England Mike Dunn 10–9 Scotland Billy Snaddon
England Mark Selby 10–8 Belgium Bjorn Haneveer England Mark Selby 10–6 England Jason Ferguson England Mark Selby 10–6 England Alfie Burden England David Gray 10–7 England Mark Selby
England Jason Weston 10–2 England Jason Wallace England Ali Carter 10–4 England Jason Weston Wales Darren Morgan 10–7 England Ali Carter England Anthony Hamilton 10–7 Wales Darren Morgan
Wales James Reynolds 10–6 England Jeff Cundy Northern Ireland Gerard Greene 10–7 Wales James Reynolds England Michael Holt 10–7 Northern Ireland Gerard Greene Australia Quinten Hann 10–6 England Michael Holt
Northern Ireland Jason Prince 10–9 England Wayne Brown England David Roe 10–2 Northern Ireland Jason Prince England David Roe 10–3 England Jimmy Michie Scotland Drew Henry 10–5 England David Roe
Finland Robin Hull 10–1 England Neal Foulds Finland Robin Hull 10–5 England Gary Ponting Finland Robin Hull 10–6 England Gary Wilkinson Finland Robin Hull 10–8 England Steve Davis
England Barry Hawkins 10–5 England Nick Pearce England Stuart Pettman 10–6 England Barry Hawkins England Stuart Pettman 10–5 England Brian Morgan Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 10–9 England Stuart Pettman
England Anthony Bolsover 10–3 England Paul Davison England Robert Milkins 10–7 England Anthony Bolsover England Robert Milkins 10–3 England Andy Hicks England Robert Milkins 10–8 Malta Tony Drago
England Shaun Murphy 10–5 England Adrian Gunnell England Shaun Murphy 10–7 England Nick Dyson England Shaun Murphy 10–5 Scotland Jamie Burnett England Shaun Murphy 10–4 Hong Kong Marco Fu
England Nick Walker 10–6 England Andrew Higginson England Jonathan Birch 10–7 England Nick Walker Pakistan Shokat Ali 10–6 England Jonathan Birch England John Parrott 10–9 Pakistan Shokat Ali
England Barry Pinches 10–5 Luke Simmonds England Barry Pinches 10–7 Scotland Stephen Maguire Northern Ireland Terry Murphy 10–9 England Barry Pinches England Joe Perry 10–9 Northern Ireland Terry Murphy
England Stephen Kershaw 10–7 England Lee Spick Wales Paul Davies 10–5 England Stephen Kershaw Wales Paul Davies 10–5 Northern Ireland Patrick Wallace Scotland Chris Small 10–7 Wales Paul Davies
England Andrew Norman 10–7 Scotland Martin Dziewialtowski England Andrew Norman 10–6 England Steve James England Ian McCulloch 10–3 England Andrew Norman Thailand James Wattana 10–7 England Ian McCulloch

Century breaks[edit]

There were 68 century breaks in the main stages of the event, which was at the time a record total. It was equalled in 2007 and superseded in 2009.[94][95] The highest break of the tournament was 145, made by Matthew Stevens during his quarter-final match against Higgins.[18] This was just the second time that the highest break of the tournament was 145, after Doug Mountjoy's in 1981.[94] Hendry's 16 century breaks made during the tournament bettered the previous record total of 14 set by John Higgins in 1998.[96][97]

References[edit]

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