2003 Masters Tournament

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2003 Masters Tournament
Tournament information
Dates April 11–13, 2003
Location Augusta, Georgia
Course(s) Augusta National Golf Club
Organized by Augusta National Golf Club
Tour(s) PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 72
Length 7,290 yards (6,666 m)
Field 93 players, 49 after cut
Cut 149 (+5)
Prize fund $6,000,000
5,496,045
Winner's share $1,080,000
€1,008,312
Champion
Canada Mike Weir
281 (−7), playoff

The 2003 Masters Tournament was the 67th Masters Tournament, held April 11–13 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Mike Weir won his only major title in a one-hole playoff over Len Mattiace. He was the first Canadian to win a major, and also the first left-handed player to win the Masters.[1][2]

The start of the first round was delayed until early Friday morning due to successive days of heavy rain; the second round was started on Friday afternoon and completed on Saturday morning.[3]

Field[edit]

1. Masters champions

Tommy Aaron, Seve Ballesteros, Charles Coody, Fred Couples, Ben Crenshaw, Nick Faldo (10,11), Raymond Floyd, Bernhard Langer (16,17), Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Jack Nicklaus, José María Olazábal (10,14,16), Mark O'Meara (3), Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Vijay Singh (4,10,14,15,16,17), Craig Stadler, Tom Watson, Tiger Woods (2,3,4,5,12,14,15,16,17), Ian Woosnam, Fuzzy Zoeller

2. U.S. Open champions (last five years)

Retief Goosen (10,14,16,17), Lee Janzen

3. The Open champions (last five years)

David Duval (16,17), Ernie Els (10,14,15,16,17), Paul Lawrie (16)

4. PGA champions (last five years)

Rich Beem (14,16,17), David Toms (14,16,17)

5. The Players Championship winners (last three years)

Davis Love III (14,15,16,17), Craig Perks (14)

6. U.S. Amateur champion and runner-up

Ricky Barnes (a), Hunter Mahan (a)

7. The Amateur champion

Alejandro Larrazábal (a)

8. U.S. Amateur Public Links champion

Ryan Moore (a)

9. U.S. Mid-Amateur champion

George Zahringer (a)

10. Top 16 players and ties from the 2002 Masters

Ángel Cabrera (16,17), Chris DiMarco (14,16,17), Brad Faxon (14,16,17), Sergio García (11,14,16,17), Pádraig Harrington (11,16,17), Miguel Ángel Jiménez, Shigeki Maruyama (14,16,17), Phil Mickelson (11,14,16,17), Colin Montgomerie (16,17), Adam Scott (16,17)

11. Top eight players and ties from the 2002 U.S. Open

Tom Byrum, Scott Hoch (14,15,16,17), Jeff Maggert, Billy Mayfair, Nick Price (14,16,17)

12. Top four players and ties from 2002 PGA Championship

Fred Funk (14,16,17), Justin Leonard (14,15,16,17), Chris Riley (14,16,17)

13. Top four players and ties from the 2002 Open Championship

Stuart Appleby (14,16,17), Steve Elkington, Thomas Levet

14. Top 40 players from the 2002 PGA Tour money list

Robert Allenby (16,17), Jonathan Byrd, K. J. Choi (16,17), John Cook, Bob Estes (16,17), Jim Furyk (15,16,17), Charles Howell III (16,17), Jerry Kelly (16,17), Steve Lowery (16,17), Len Mattiace, Scott McCarron (16,17), Rocco Mediate (16,17), Craig Parry (16,17), Pat Perez, Kenny Perry (16,17), Loren Roberts, John Rollins, Jeff Sluman (16,17), Kevin Sutherland, Phil Tataurangi

15. Top 10 players from the 2003 PGA Tour money list on March 30

Chad Campbell, Jay Haas (17), Mike Weir (16,17)

16. Top 50 players from the final 2002 world ranking

Michael Campbell (17), Darren Clarke (17), Niclas Fasth (17), Toshimitsu Izawa, Shingo Katayama, Peter Lonard (17), Eduardo Romero (17), Justin Rose (17), Toru Taniguchi, Scott Verplank (17)

17. Top 50 players from world ranking published March 30

Tim Clark, John Huston, Tom Lehman, Kirk Triplett

18. Special foreign invitation

All the amateurs were playing in their first Masters, as were Rich Beem, Jonathan Byrd, Chad Campbell, K. J. Choi, Thomas Levet, Peter Lonard, Pat Perez, Chris Riley, John Rollins, Justin Rose, and Phil Tataurangi.

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Vijay Singh  Fiji 2000 73 71 70 73 287 −1 T6
Mark O'Meara  United States 1998 76 71 70 71 288 E T8
José María Olazábal  Spain 1994, 1999 73 71 71 73 288 E T8
Tiger Woods  United States 1997, 2001, 2002 76 73 66 75 290 +2 T15
Fred Couples  United States 1992 73 75 69 77 294 +6 T28
Nick Faldo  England 1989, 1990, 1996 74 73 75 73 295 +7 T33
Craig Stadler  United States 1982 76 73 79 77 305 +17 49

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Tom Watson  United States 1977, 1981 75 77 152 +8
Larry Mize  United States 1987 78 74 152 +8
Ian Woosnam  Wales 1991 80 74 154 +10
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1988 82 73 155 +11
Fuzzy Zoeller  United States 1979 77 78 155 +11
Ben Crenshaw  United States 1984, 1995 79 76 155 +11
Bernhard Langer  Germany 1985, 1993 79 76 155 +11
Raymond Floyd  United States 1976 77 80 157 +13
Gary Player  South Africa 1961, 1974, 1978 82 80 162 +18
Jack Nicklaus  United States 1963, 1965, 1966,
1972, 1975, 1986
85 77 162 +18
Seve Ballesteros  Spain 1980, 1983 77 85 162 +18
Charles Coody  United States 1971 83 81 164 +20
Arnold Palmer  United States 1958, 1960,
1962, 1964
83 83 166 +22
Tommy Aaron  United States 1973 92 80 172 +28

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Friday, April 11, 2003

With play canceled due to rain on Thursday, the first round started at 7 am Friday with players teeing off at the 1st and 10th holes. The round was dominated by Darren Clarke, who posted a six-under 66. The score was even more impressive considering only seven shot under par for the round. Sergio García shot 69 (−3), in a second place tie with 2002 U.S. Amateur champion Ricky Barnes. Three-time major champion, Nick Price, shot 70 (−2), for a fourth place tie with Canadian Mike Weir. Two-time defending champ and three-time Masters champion, Tiger Woods shot a disappointing 76 (+4), ten strokes back.[3]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Darren Clarke  Northern Ireland 66 −6
T2 Ricky Barnes (a)  United States 69 −3
Sergio García  Spain
T4 Nick Price  Zimbabwe 70 −2
Mike Weir  Canada
T6 Toru Taniguchi  Japan 71 −1
David Toms  United States
T8 Tim Clark  South Africa 72 E
Jerry Kelly  United States
Paul Lawrie  Scotland
Jeff Maggert  United States

Second round[edit]

Friday, April 11, 2003
Saturday, April 12, 2003

Due the postponement of play on Thursday, the second round started at 2 pm on Friday with players starting at the 1st and 10th tees. In what proved to be another very difficult round at Augusta, Weir took a four stroke 36-hole lead with a four-under 68 for 138 (−6). Only 16 of the 93 competitors finished with a round below par, and only four were under par at the halfway mark. First round leader Clarke came back to earth with 76 (+4) for solo second at 142 (−2). Phil Mickelson charged up the leaderboard with a two-under 70 into a tie for third place with amateur Barnes. (Two other amateurs also made the cut, Hunter Mahan and Ryan Moore.) Five were tied for fifth place at even-par 144, including two former Masters champions in Vijay Singh and José María Olazábal. The round was completed on Saturday morning and the 36-hole cut was set at 149 (+5). The biggest name to fail to make the weekend was Colin Montgomerie.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Mike Weir  Canada 70-68=138 −6
2 Darren Clarke  Northern Ireland 66-76=142 −2
T3 Ricky Barnes (a)  United States 69-74=143 −1
Phil Mickelson  United States 73-70=143
T5 Brad Faxon  United States 73-71=144 E
Paul Lawrie  Scotland 72-72=144
José María Olazábal  Spain 73-71=144
Vijay Singh  Fiji 73-71=144
David Toms  United States 71-73=144
T10 Jonathan Byrd  United States 74-71=145 +1
K. J. Choi  South Korea 76-69=145
Ernie Els  South Africa 79-66=145
Jim Furyk  United States 73-72=145
Charles Howell III  United States 73-72=145
Jeff Maggert  United States 72-73=145
Hunter Mahan (a)  United States 73-72=145
Billy Mayfair  United States 75-70=145
Nick Price  Zimbabwe 70-75=145
John Rollins  United States 74-71=145
Phil Tataurangi  New Zealand 75-70=145

Amateurs: Barnes (-1), Mahan (+1), Moore (+3), Larrázabal (+19), Zahringer (+23).

Third round[edit]

Saturday, April 12, 2003

Following the completion of the second round on Saturday morning, "Moving day" lived up to its name in the third round as Jeff Maggert charged to the 54-hole lead with a six-under 66 for 211 (−5). Second round leader Weir shot 75 (+3) to fall back to 213 (−3), in solo second place and the final Sunday pairing with Maggert. Singh moved into a tie for third with another major champion in David Toms at 214 (−2). Woods matched the round of the day with a 66 (−6) to ascend the leaderboard to keep his bid for three-straight Masters alive. Mickelson and Olazábal were tied with Woods at 215 for fifth place. Len Mattiace shot 69 (−3) to get to even-par 216, five strokes back in a tie for eighth. The third round was completed late on Saturday, and the tournament was finally back on schedule.[4]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Jeff Maggert  United States 72-73-66=211 −5
2 Mike Weir  Canada 70-68-75=213 −3
T3 Vijay Singh  Fiji 73-71-70=214 −2
David Toms  United States 71-73-70=214
T5 Phil Mickelson  United States 73-70-72=215 −1
José María Olazábal  Spain 73-71-71=215
Tiger Woods  United States 76-73-66=215
T8 Jonathan Byrd  United States 74-71-71=216 E
Jim Furyk  United States 73-72-71=216
Len Mattiace  United States 73-74-69=216

Source:[5]

Final round[edit]

Sunday, April 13, 2003

Despite one of the largest major championship final round comebacks by Mattiace, Mike Weir bested him in a sudden death playoff for his first major title. Weir became the first Canadian ever to win a major championship, and also became the first left-handed player to win the Masters. The sudden death playoff at the par 4 10th was the only extra hole needed, as Weir's bogey was good enough as Mattiace double-bogeyed the hole. Weir recovered from his disappointing third round with his second 68 of the tournament to force the playoff. To get into the sudden death playoff, Weir made a 7-foot (2 m) putt for par on the 18th green. Mattiace's only bogey (besides the playoff hole) of his tournament-low 65 (−7) was at the 18th hole. He teed off forty minutes and four groups ahead of the final pairing,[5] so Mattiace had about an hour between the completion of his round and the start of the playoff.

Third round leader Maggert shot a disappointing 75 (+3) to finish in solo fifth place. Maggert had no bogeys or double bogeys, but made a triple bogey 7 on the third hole and a quintuple bogey 8 on the twelfth hole. Mickelson's 68 (−4) was only enough for solo third, two strokes behind Weir and Mattiace. It marked Mickelson's third straight third-place finish at the Masters (he would win the green jacket in 2004, 2006, and 2010). Jim Furyk also shot a four-under 68 for a fourth-place finish which equaled his best Masters finish at 284 (−4). (He would win the next major, at the U.S. Open in June.) Ernie Els and Singh rounded out the under par finishers at 287 (−1), in a tie for sixth. Toms shot 74 and fell back to even-par 288, in a five-way tie for eighth. Woods' bid for his third straight Masters victory came up well short with a disappointing 75 (+3) for 290 (+2), nine strokes back. Amateur Barnes was the low-amateur, after being near the top of the leaderboard the first two rounds.

This was the last year the sudden-death playoff began on the 10th tee. Beginning in 2004, the playoff starting point was changed to the 18th hole, which then alternated with the 10th hole until a winner emerged;[6] the first use was in 2005.

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
T1 Mike Weir  Canada 70-68-75-68=281 −7 Playoff
Len Mattiace  United States 73-74-69-65=281
3 Phil Mickelson  United States 73-70-72-68=283 −5 408,000
4 Jim Furyk  United States 73-72-71-68=284 −4 288,000
5 Jeff Maggert  United States 72-73-66-75=286 −2 240,000
T6 Ernie Els  South Africa 79-66-72-70=287 −1 208,500
Vijay Singh  Fiji 73-71-70-73=287
T8 Jonathan Byrd  United States 74-71-71-72=288 E 162,000
José María Olazábal  Spain 73-71-71-73=288
Mark O'Meara  United States 76-71-70-71=288
David Toms  United States 71-73-70-74=288
Scott Verplank  United States 76-73-70-69=288

Amateurs: Barnes (+3), Mahan (+6), Moore (+13).

Scorecard[edit]

Final round

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 4
Canada Weir −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −7 −7 −7 −7
United States Mattiace E −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −6 −6 −7 −8 −8 −7
United States Mickelson −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −5
United States Furyk E −1 −1 −1 −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 −1 −1 −3 −3 −4 −4
United States Maggert −5 −5 −2 −2 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −4 −4 +1 +1 E −1 −2 −2 −2
South Africa Els E E +1 +1 +2 +1 +1 E −1 −1 E E −1 −1 −1 −1 −1 −1
Fiji Singh −2 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −4 −3 −2 −2 −1 −1 −1 −1
United States Toms −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 E +1 +1 E E E
United States Woods −1 −2 E +1 +1 +1 +2 +3 +2 +2 +2 +2 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par
Source:[7]

Playoff[edit]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Mike Weir  Canada 5 +1 1,080,000
2 Len Mattiace  United States 6 +2 648,000
  • Sudden-death playoff began and ended on par-4 10th hole; Weir's bogey defeated Mattiace.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Price, S.L. (April 21, 2003). "Weir and Wonderful". Sports Illustrated. 
  2. ^ Dulac, Gerry (April 14, 2003). "A Weir-d Masters". Toledo Blade. Block News Alliance. p. C1. 
  3. ^ a b Ferguson, Dave (April 12, 2003). "On long day at Augusta, it's even longer for Woods". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. p. C1. 
  4. ^ Bonk, Thomas (April 13, 2003). "Tiger goes from near-miss to near lead". Eugene Register-Guard. (Los Angeles Times). p. D1. 
  5. ^ a b "Tournament Scoreboard: The 67th Masters". Eugene Register-Guard. April 13, 2003. p. D4. 
  6. ^ "Masters playoff format is changed". CNN.com. April 7, 2004. Retrieved January 7, 2013. 
  7. ^ "2003 Masters leaderboard". Augusta.com. April 13, 2003. Retrieved June 20, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2002 PGA Championship
Major Championships Succeeded by
2003 U.S. Open

Coordinates: 33°30′11″N 82°01′12″W / 33.503°N 82.020°W / 33.503; -82.020