2003 Southeast Asian Games

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22nd Southeast Asian Games
2003seagames.png
Motto Solidarity, Cooperation for Peace and Development
Nations participating 11
Athletes participating 5000+
Events 42 sports
Opening ceremony 5 December 2003
Closing ceremony 13 December 2003
Officially opened by Phan Văn Khải
Prime Minister of Vietnam
Athlete's Oath Nguyễn Mạnh Tường
Judge's Oath Hoàng Xuân Vinh
Torch lighter Nguyễn Thúy Hiền
(Wushu)
Ceremony venue Mỹ Đình National Stadium, Hanoi
Website 2003 Southeast Asian Games
2001 2005  >

The 2003 Southeast Asian Games, officially known as the 22nd Southeast Asian Games (Vietnamese: Đại hội Thể thao Đông Nam Á 2003) was a multi-sport event held in Hanoi, Vietnam from 5–13 December 2003 with 42 sports and disciplines featured in the games. The games were opened by Vietnamese prime minister Phan Văn Khải in the newly constructed Mỹ Đình National Stadium in Hanoi. The games torch was lit by Nguyen Thuy Hien of Wushu. It was the first time in history Vietnam hosted the Southeast Asian Games, the first time Southeast Asian games venues were assigned into two cities namely Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City and the first time Timor-Leste participated in the Southeast Asian Games under the name United Nations East Timor.

Vietnam is the seventh nation to host the Southeast Asian Games after Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines and Brunei.

The final medal tally was led by host Vietnam, followed by Thailand and Indonesia. Several Asian, games and national records were broken during the games. With little or no controversies at all, the games were deemed generally successful with the rising standards of competition amongst the Southeast Asian Nations.

Organisation[edit]

2003 Southeast Asian Games host cities

Venues[edit]

The 22nd Southeast Asian Games had 44 venues for the games. 28 in Hanoi and 16 in Ho Chi Minh City.

City Competition Venue Sports
Hanoi National Sports Complex
My Dinh National Stadium
Athletics, Football
My Dinh Aquatics Centre Swimming, Diving, Finswimming, Water polo
Other
West Lake Canoeing, Rowing, Dragon boat
Hanoi National Sports Training Centre No. 1 Archery, Shooting
Trịnh Hoài Đức Gymnasium Wushu
Cầu Giấy District Gymnasium Fencing
Quần Ngựa Sports Palace Gymnastics
Gia Lâm Gymnasium Karate
Sóc Sơn Gymnasium Weightlifting
Hai Bà Trưng Gymnasium Sepak takraw
Hoàn Kiếm Lake Cycling
Hang Day Stadium
Ha Noi - Ha Tay - Hoa Binh
Hanoi - Ho Chi Minh City
Hanoi - Bac Ninh - Hoa Binh
C500 Sporting Event Hall
Ha Tay Competition Hall
Lach Tray Stadium
Hai Phong - Ho Chi Minh City
Phu Tho Competition House
Nam Dinh Competition Hall
Thien Truong Stadium
Nam Dinh - Ninh Binh
Ninh Binh Competition Hall
Vinh Phuc Competition Hall
Hai Duong Competition Hall
Ho Chi Minh City Tân Bình Gymnasium Badminton
Army Gymnasium Basketball
Phan Đình Phùng Gymnasium Boxing
Lãnh Bình Thăng Gymnasium Judo
Phú Thọ Gymnasium Taekwondo
Lan Anh Gymnasium Tennis
Nguyễn Du Gymnasium Billiards and Snooker
Bến Thành Theatre Bodybuilding
4th District Gymnasium Chess
Thống Nhất Stadium Football
Ky Hoa physical training & Sporting Center - District 10
Van Don Sports Center
Lan Ahn Club
Nguyen Du Sports Center
Hanoi - Ho Chi Minh City
Hai Phong - Ho Chi Minh City

Marketing[edit]

Logo and mascot[edit]

Trau Vang, a golden buffalo is the official mascot of the games.

The logo of the 2003 Southeast Asian Games is a stylisation of a legendary bird named "Chim Lac". Designed by Artist Nguyen Chi Long, it depicts the bird decorated the Ngoc Lu bronze drum, a typical antiquity of the ancient Dong Son Vietnamese culture. The Emblem is composed of harmonious and strong curves, creating a feeling of movement and strength which causes a sense of motion upwards to the Olympic Spirit: "Faster, Higher and Stronger". The 5 lines of colours represents the tough and drastic competition in sports. The 10 intersecting circles, the symbol of the South East Asian Sport Federation, are to emphasise the solidarity, friendship and nobility, which are highly esteemed by Vietnam - the host country of the 22nd SEA Games.[1]

Designed by artist Nguyen Thai Hung, the mascot of the 2003 Southeast Asian Games is a golden water buffalo named Trâu Vàng. Described as a gentle, industrious, wise, faithful and harmonious animal in nature, the buffalo has become synonymous with the water and rice civilisation that is so important in Vietnam, as well as in other Southeast Asian countries. To the Vietnamese people, the Golden Buffalo symbolises a desire for abundant harvest, prosperity, happiness, power and the Vietnamese martial spirit as well as open–heartedness, joy and hospitality of the host country.[2]

Songs[edit]

The games' hymn was "For the World of Tomorrow". It was composed by Nguyen Quang Vinh.[3]

Sponsors[edit]

The games[edit]

Opening Ceremony[edit]

The opening ceremony was held on 5 December 2003 at the My Dinh National Stadium in Hanoi at 20:00 pm (VST) where the Vietnamese prime minister Phan Van Khai declare opened the games and the games torch was lit by Nguyen Thuy Hien of Wushu. The opening ceremony begins with the parachutes bringing flags of 11 participating nations and the parade of athletes from 11 participating nations. The opening ceremony was divided into chapters namely, Chapter 1: "Land of Dragons and Fairies", Chapter 2: "Cooperation for Peace" and Chapter 3: "ASEAN solidarity towards the future". The ceremony concludes with the official theme of the 22nd SEA Games "For the World of Tomorrow" performed by 11 pairs of male and female singers and the display of colourful fireworks.

Closing Ceremony[edit]

The closing ceremony was held on 13 December 2003 at the My Dinh National Stadium in Hanoi at 20:00 pm (VST) where the Southeast Asian Games hosting rights was handed over to Philippines, host of the 2005 Southeast Asian Games.

Participating nations[edit]

Sports[edit]

¹ - not an official Olympic Sport
² - sport played only in the SEA Games
³ - not a traditional Olympic nor SEA Games Sport and introduced only by the host country.

Calendar[edit]

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Gold medals CC Closing ceremony
November / December 29
Sat
30
Sun
1
Mon
2
Tue
3
Wed
4
Thu
5
Fri
6
Sat
7
Sun
8
Mon
9
Tue
10
Wed
11
Thu
12
Fri
13
Sat
14
Sun
Gold medals
Ceremonies OC CC
Archery
Athletics
Badminton
Basketball
Billiards & snooker
Boxing
Canoeing
Chess
Cycling
Fin swimming
Fencing
Football
Gymnastics
Handball
Judo
Karate
Pencak silat
Petanque pictogram.svg Pétanque
Rowing
Shuttle cock
Sepaktakraw
Shooting
Swimming
Table tennis
Taekwondo
Tennis
Traditional boat race
Volleyball
Weightlifting
Wrestling
Wushu
Total gold medals
Cumulative total
November / December 29
Sat
30
Sun
1
Mon
2
Tue
3
Wed
4
Thu
5
Fri
6
Sat
7
Sun
8
Mon
9
Tue
10
Wed
11
Thu
12
Fri
13
Sat
14
Sun
Gold medals

Medal Table[edit]

A total of 1440 medals, comprising 444 gold medals, 441 silver medals and 555 bronze medals were awarded to athletes. The host Vietnam performance was the best ever yet in Southeast Asian Games history and emerged as overall champion of the games.[5]

  Host nation

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Vietnam (VIE) 158 97 91 346
2  Thailand (THA) 90 93 98 281
3  Indonesia (INA) 55 68 98 221
4  Philippines (PHI) 48 54 75 177
5  Malaysia (MAS) 44 42 59 145
6  Singapore (SIN) 30 33 50 113
7  Myanmar (MYA) 16 43 50 109
8  Laos (LAO) 1 5 15 21
9  Cambodia (CAM) 1 5 11 17
10  Brunei (BRU) 1 1 8 10
11  Timor-Leste (TLS) 0 0 0 0
Total 444 441 555 1440

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Logo at the Official Website of the games". 2003 Southeast Asian Games. April 15, 2004. Archived from the original on 15 April 2004. Retrieved November 6, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Mascot at the Official Website of the games". 2003 Southeast Asian Games. April 15, 2004. Archived from the original on 15 April 2004. Retrieved November 6, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Hymn at the Official Website of the games". 2003 Southeast Asian Games. April 15, 2004. Archived from the original on 15 April 2004. Retrieved November 6, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Sponsor List at the official website of the games". 13 May 2004. Archived from the original on 13 May 2004. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  5. ^ "Memories of the 22nd SEA Games - 2003: Great Spur!". 12 March 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 

External links[edit]


Preceded by
2001
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Southeast Asian Games Succeeded by
2005
multiple venues, Philippines