2004 Grand Prix (snooker)

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Totesport Grand Prix
Tournament information
Dates 2–10 October 2004
Venue Guild Hall
City Preston
Country England
Organisation(s) WPBSA
Format Ranking event
Total prize fund £400,000
Winner's share £60,000
Highest break Scotland John Higgins (147)
Final
Champion England Ronnie O'Sullivan
Runner-up England Ian McCulloch
Score 9–5
2003
2005

The 2004 Totesport Grand Prix was the 2004 edition of the Grand Prix snooker tournament and was held from 2 to 10 October 2004 at the Guild Hall in Preston, England. World number one Ronnie O'Sullivan won the tournament defeating Ian McCulloch by nine frames to five (9–5) in the final. In the semi-finals O'Sullivan defeated Paul Hunter 6–3 and McCulloch beat Michael Judge 6–1. Mark Williams, who won the same event under the name LG Cup the year before, lost in the first round. John Higgins made the highest break with a 147. The 64-man tournament was the first of eight WPBSA ranking events in the 2004/2005 snooker season and the next event following last season's World Championship, which was won by O'Sullivan. It preceded the second ranking event of the season, the British Open.

Tournament summary[edit]

The tournament was created as the Professional Players Tournament in 1982 by the snooker governing body, the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA), to provide another ranking event. It was renamed the Grand Prix for the 1984 event until 2001, when it was called the LG Cup, before reverting to the Grand Prix this year.[1] The tournament was the first of eight WPBSA ranking events in the 2004/2005 snooker season and the next event following last season's World Championship, which was won by Ronnie O'Sullivan, now a two-time world champion and the world number one. Mark Williams won the same event under the name LG Cup last year. The tournament preceded the second ranking event of the season, the British Open. Sponsored by totesport for the first time after signing a one-year contract announced on the day before the event started,[2] it had a prize fund of £400,000 and was broadcast on the BBC and Eurosport.[3]

Qualifying[edit]

The qualifying rounds were played between players on the main tour ranked 33 and lower for one of 32 places in the final stage at Pontin's Snooker Centre in Prestatyn, Wales. The matches were best-of-9 frames until the semi-finals. Highly regarded 17-year-old Chinese player Ding Junhui narrowly missed out in qualifying.[4] The other successful qualifiers included the likes of Mark Selby, Barry Hawkins, Shaun Murphy and Neil Robertson.[5]

Round one[edit]

In round one the 32 qualifiers faced members of the top 32, including the top 16 seeds. In this round O'Sullivan defeated Mark Davis 5–2, compiling a century break of 114. After the match O'Sullivan praised his mentor Ray Reardon. World number 51 Andy Hicks claimed the scalp of UK champion Matthew Stevens 5–1, compiling two century breaks and three half-centuries in the 72-minute match. After struggling early on, 1997 world champion Ken Doherty went through by beating Anthony Davies 5–1. Dominic Dale, the 1997 winner, made breaks of 108, 68, 61 and 58 in defeating Scott MacKenzie 5–1. David Gray whitewashed Lee Walker 5–0, while Joe Perry beat Pakistan's Shokat Ali 5–1.[6] James Wattana lost a frame after three consecutive misses from an unsnookered position, but still defeated John Parrott 5–2, a match in which Parrott's highest break was 32.[6][7]

Six-time world champion Steve Davis, at 47 the oldest player on the tour, defeated Sean Storey 5–1, after which he said "At the start I couldn't hit the side of a bus station, but Sean let me off and in the end I didn't play badly."[8] Seven-time world champion Stephen Hendry prevailed 5–4 over Jamie Burnett in a narrowly fought contest. Burnett, the world number 49, was 4–3 ahead and had potted the final red, but he missed the black, however, and Hendry forced a deciding frame which he won.[7] After the match, Hendry said "I got out of jail".[8] Breaks of 75, 61 and 56 enabled 2002 world champion Peter Ebdon to claim a 5–2 victory over Simon Bedford. Chinese player Jin Long, in his first appearance in the final stage of a ranking event, led Tony Drago 3–0 before Drago won five consecutive frames. Nigel Bond defeated Gerard Greene 5–2, while Anthony Hamilton overcame Jimmy Michie by the same scoreline. Marco Fu, a former Grand Prix runner-up, claimed a 5–2 victory over David Roe.[8] After coming back from 3–4 down to beat Patrick Wallace 5–4, Jimmy White revealed he nearly withdrew from the tournament because of a back injury.[9]

Williams, the world number two, was the highest ranked player to lose in the round when he lost 2–5 against Michael Judge. In the fifth frame, at 2–2, Williams was 64–0 ahead but a black ball clearance of 70 gave Judge the lead, who went on to win the match. After the match, Williams said that he was nowhere near the player he was a year ago.[10] World number four and Masters champion Paul Hunter made breaks of 108 and 127 in defeating Darren Morgan 5–3.[11] European Open winner Stephen Maguire defeated Murphy 5–2, a match in which Maguire had a frame docked. As the match was about to begin and after they had shaken hands, Maguire realised he had not brought his chalk with him. He asked for permission to retrieve it from referee Johan Oomen, which was granted. As Maguire was away, Murphy spoke to the referee and questioned whether Maguire should be docked a frame, as he was technically not ready to play at the scheduled time. Mike Ganley, the tournament director, was called and docked a frame from Maguire, a ruling which angered Maguire.[12] Of the incident Maguire said "Rules are rules but I've never heard of anything like that happening before."[11] The incident was said to be a key point in the rivalry between Maguire and Murphy.[13][14]

John Higgins made the highest break in the tournament with a maximum break in his 3–5 loss to Ricky Walden. It was his fifth maximum and the 49th in snooker history. It also earned him a bonus of £20,000.[15] For Walden it was the second time he reached the second round of a ranking event.[16] In a match in which the deciding frame lasted 64 minutes and ended past midnight, Alan McManus overcame Fergal O'Brien 5–4. Graeme Dott, the surprise runner-up at the World Championship, emerged a 5–4 winner over Ryan Day.[7] Of the other seeded players, Chris Small lost 4–5 to Selby, Stephen Lee beat Hugh Abernethy 5–2 and Quinten Hann lost 3–5 against Marcus Campbell.[5]

Round two[edit]

Davis became the first player through to the last 16 when he defeated Drago 5–1, after which he expressed his surprise he was still in the tournament. O'Sullivan overcame a chest infection to beat Joe Swail 5–1, but missed his post-match press conference. Hunter came from 2–4 down with a score of 0–39 in the seventh to beat Ali Carter, compiling a century break in the decider.[17] Preston's Ian McCulloch beat White 5–4 with a break of 73 in the deciding frame. After beating Robert Milkins 5–3, Hendry expressed dissatisfaction with his performance. Maguire, the Snooker Writers' Association Young Player of the Year, saw off Walden 5–3 and said of the chalk incident "I made sure I had it this time."[18] In the match between Fu and Hawkins Fu led 4–2, before Hawkins forced a deciding frame, which Fu won. Judge continued his run by defeating Campbell 5–4 with breaks of 76, 61, and 52, and said his victory over Williams had given him confidence.[19] Wattana beat Doherty 5–3 by fluking the final brown from a snooker, before potting blue and pink for the victory. Doherty said "It was a cruel blow. ... I had James in a really good snooker and from where I was sat it did not even look as though he could hit it."[20] Of the other seeds, Lee enjoyed a 5–1 victory over Hamilton, Dott defeated Dale 5–2, Ebdon beat Joe Jogia 5–4, Perry beat David Gray 5–3 and McManus lost 4–5 against Nigel Bond. The other non-seeded victors were Selby and Australian Robertson.[5]

Round three[edit]

In the third round Dott failed to get revenge for his World Championship loss, as he was defeated 3–5 by O'Sullivan. After beating Davis 5–1, Hunter said he wished Davis would speed up his play.[21] In the match Hunter made his fourth century break of the tournament and had breaks of 71, 66, 43, and 53.[22] Hendry was defeated 3–5 by McCulloch by losing five of the last six frames, and said he was not the player he was.[21][22] His break of 67 in the last frame was eclipsed by McCulloch's 72, who also made a break of 105 in the match.[22] Breaks of 133 and 103 plus further runs of 41, 70, and 87 enabled Perry to beat Robertson 5–3 from 1–3 down. Selby saw off Ebdon 5–3 and said "Hopefully there's more to come."[21] Maguire defeated Bond 5–1, while Wattana beat Lee and Judge beat Fu by the same scoreline.[5]

Quarter-finals[edit]

In the quarter-finals O'Sullivan took 71 minutes to whitewash Selby 5–0, compiling two breaks of 135 and outscoring Selby 522–46.[23][24] After the match O'Sullivan said "My safety was good, so was my thinking, and so was my break-building. It's as well as I have played in the tournament."[23] Another whitewash occurred when Wattana was defeated 0–5 by Hunter, a match eight minutes longer than O'Sullivan's, whom he would face in the semi-finals. After the match Hunter said "I was racing Ronnie. I could see from the scoreboard that he was 3–0 up when I was leading 2–0."[23]

In the other quarter-finals McCulloch defeated Maguire 5–2 after an error from Maguire, when he missed the pink for a probable 2–0 lead.[23] The match included a 137 clearance from McCulloch.[25] After the match Maguire said "I went for a crazy one and paid the price but I think today I was just a bit too cocky. I didn't believe I was going to lose."[23] Judge beat Perry 5–1 to face McCulloch in his first ranking event semi-final, and became the fourth Irish player to achieve this feat after Eugene Hughes, Doherty and Fergal O'Brien.[25]

Semi-finals[edit]

In the semi-final, now best-of-11 frames, O'Sullivan defeated Hunter 6–3. O'Sullivan started strongly and opened up a lead of 3–1 at the mid-session interval. Hunter closed the gap to 2–3, before O'Sullivan won the sixth frame. A break of 80 from Hunter followed, before O'Sullivan won the next two for the match, compiling a 107 in the final frame.[26]

The other semi-final saw McCulloch beat Judge 6–1, a match in which Judge's highest break was 44. After his defeat Judge said he was happy with his form during the tournament.[27]

Final[edit]

In the best-of-17 final O'Sullivan defeated McCulloch 9–5 to win his second consecutive ranking title. It was his 21st ranking final and 16th ranking title, which meant he was now third on the list ahead of Williams and Higgins. The victory earned him £60,000 and meant he had won all the ranking events on the calendar at least once.[28] After the match O'Sullivan said he could still improve: "I have set myself high standards and I don't think I was firing on any cylinders."[29] McCulloch said he was sure he would win a ranking title: "I have lost two finals now but I will win one—it is just a matter of when."[29]

In the first session of the final O'Sullivan won the first frame with a break of 86. The next two frames were shared, before O'Sullivan made a century, which he followed with a 72 in the frame after. The sixth frame had lasted 36 minutes, when O’Sullivan stroked in the pink to a distant balk pocket before clipping in a tricky black for 5–1 lead.[28] McCulloch won the next to bring the score to 5–2 in O'Sullivan's favour at the end of the first session. In the second session O'Sullivan took the first two with breaks of 66 and 104. O'Sullivan won two of the next three to bring the score to 8–4, before missing a relatively straightforward pot in the 13th, which allowed McCulloch to take the frame. A break of 71 in the next gave O'Sullivan the victory.[30]

Main draw[edit]

[5][31]

Round 1
Best of 9 frames
Round 2
Best of 9 frames
Round 3
Best of 9 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 9 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 11 frames
Final
Best of 17 frames
                                   
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 5
England Mark Davis 2
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 5
30 Northern Ireland Joe Swail 1
31 Northern Ireland Joe Swail 5
England Mike Dunn 3
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 5
15 Scotland Graeme Dott 3
15 Scotland Graeme Dott 5
Wales Ryan Day 4
15 Scotland Graeme Dott 5
32 Wales Dominic Dale 2
32 Wales Dominic Dale 5
Scotland Scott MacKenzie 1
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 5
England Mark Selby 0
12 Scotland Chris Small 4
England Mark Selby 5
  England Mark Selby 5
Republic of Ireland Leo Fernandez 2
27 Scotland Drew Henry 4
Republic of Ireland Leo Fernandez 5
England Mark Selby 5
8 England Peter Ebdon 3
8 England Peter Ebdon 5
England Simon Bedford 2
8 England Peter Ebdon 5
England Joe Jogia 4
23 England Mark King 0
England Joe Jogia 5
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 6
4 England Paul Hunter 3
7 Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 5
Wales Anthony Davies 1
7 Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 3
Thailand James Wattana 5
31 England John Parrott 2
Thailand James Wattana 5
Thailand James Wattana 5
9 England Stephen Lee 1
9 England Stephen Lee 5
Scotland Hugh Abernethy 2
9 England Stephen Lee 5
25 England Anthony Hamilton 1
25 England Anthony Hamilton 5
England Jimmy Michie 2
Thailand James Wattana 0
4 England Paul Hunter 5
13 England Steve Davis 5
England Sean Storey 1
13 England Steve Davis 5
22 Malta Tony Drago 1
22 Malta Tony Drago 5
China Jin Long 3
13 England Steve Davis 1
4 England Paul Hunter 5
4 England Paul Hunter 5
Wales Darren Morgan 3
4 England Paul Hunter 5
19 England Allister Carter 4
19 England Allister Carter 5
England Adrian Gunnell 4
1 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 9
17 England Ian McCulloch 5
3 Scotland Stephen Hendry 5
Scotland Jamie Burnett 4
3 Scotland Stephen Hendry 5
28 England Robert Milkins 3
28 England Robert Milkins 52
England Rory McLeod 2
3 Scotland Stephen Hendry 3
17 England Ian McCulloch 5
11 England Jimmy White 5
Northern Ireland Patrick Wallace 4
11 England Jimmy White 4
17 England Ian McCulloch 5
17 England Ian McCulloch 5
England Rod Lawler 4
17 England Ian McCulloch 5
24 Scotland Stephen Maguire 2
10 Scotland Alan McManus 5
Republic of Ireland Fergal O'Brien 4
10 Scotland Alan McManus 4
England Nigel Bond 5
26 Northern Ireland Gerard Greene 2
England Nigel Bond 5
England Nigel Bond 1
24 Scotland Stephen Maguire 5
5 Scotland John Higgins 3
England Ricky Walden 5
England Ricky Walden 3
24 Scotland Stephen Maguire 5
24 Scotland Stephen Maguire 5
England Shaun Murphy 2
17 England Ian McCulloch 6
Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 1
6 Wales Matthew Stevens 1
England Andy Hicks 5
  England Andy Hicks 3
Australia Neil Robertson 5
29 England Michael Holt 2
Australia Neil Robertson 5
Australia Neil Robertson 3
20 England Joe Perry 5
14 England David Gray 5
Wales Lee Walker 0
14 England David Gray 3
20 England Joe Perry 5
20 England Joe Perry 5
Pakistan Shokat Ali 1
20 England Joe Perry 1
Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 5
16 Hong Kong Marco Fu 5
England David Roe 2
16 Hong Kong Marco Fu 5
England Barry Hawkins 4
21 England Barry Pinches 4
England Barry Hawkins 5
16 Hong Kong Marco Fu 1
Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 5
2 Wales Mark Williams 2
Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 5
  Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 5
Scotland Marcus Campbell 4
18 Australia Quinten Hann 3
Scotland Marcus Campbell 5

Final[edit]

Final: Best of 17 frames. Referee: Netherlands Jan Verhaas.
Guild Hall, Preston, England. 10 October 2004.
Ronnie O'Sullivan (1)
 England
9–5 Ian McCulloch (17)
 England
Afternoon: 99–4 (86), 70–20, 1–75, 104–0 (104), 80–7 (72), 62–58, 8–65 (54)
Evening: 53–80 (66), 111–7 (104), 80–32, 0–91 (69), 74–17 (55), 44–78 (78), 107–23 (71)
104 Highest break 78
2 Century breaks 0
6 50+ breaks 4

Qualifying[edit]

The qualifying for the tournament took place between 8 and 9 September 2004 at Pontin's in Prestatyn, Wales. All matches were best of 9 frames.[5][31]

Century breaks[edit]

[5]

Qualifying stage centuries[edit]

Televised stage centuries[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Professional Players Tournament. Grand Prix. LG Cup". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/GP.html (Chris Turner's Snooker Archive). Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 8 September 2010. 
  2. ^ "Totesport To Sponsor Snooker's Grand Prix". Sportcal. 1 October 2004. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  3. ^ "totesport Grand Prix 2004". snooker.org. Archived from the original on 7 May 2005. Retrieved 8 September 2010. 
  4. ^ Chowdhury, Saj (1 October 2004). "Griffiths hails snooker boom". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "2004 Totesport Grand Prix". Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 26 April 2006. 
  6. ^ a b "O'Sullivan romps through". BBC Sport. 2 October 2004. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c Everton, Clive (4 October 2004). "Hendry snatches scrappy win". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2010. 
  8. ^ a b c "Davis shows good form". BBC Sport. 3 October 2004. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  9. ^ "White soldiers to victory". BBC Sport. 3 October 2004. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  10. ^ Dee, John (5 October 2004). "Faltering Williams floored by Judge". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 6 May 2009. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  11. ^ a b "Williams crashes out". BBC Sport. 4 October 2004. Archived from the original on 21 October 2007. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  12. ^ Yates, Phil (1 May 2007). "Top five frame dockings". The Times. Archived from the original on 2 December 2008. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  13. ^ Everton, Clive (15 December 2007). "Maguire wins grudge match". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  14. ^ "Higginson revelling in spotlight". Sporting Life. 17 February 2007. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  15. ^ "Higgins loses despite 147". BBC Sport. 4 October 2004. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  16. ^ "Snooker: Ricky tops on day of surprises". Manchester Evening News. 5 October 2004. Archived from the original on 12 November 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  17. ^ "Davis cruises through". BBC Sport. 5 October 2004. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  18. ^ "McCulloch downs White". BBC Sport. 6 October 2004. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  19. ^ Dee, John (7 October 2004). "Hendry struggles for win". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  20. ^ "Doherty rues rotten luck". RTÉ Sport. 6 October 2004. Archived from the original on 11 October 2004. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  21. ^ a b c "O'Sullivan on song". BBC Sport. 7 October 2004. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  22. ^ a b c Dee, John (8 October 2004). "Snooker: Hendry dispirited after loss". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  23. ^ a b c d e "O'Sullivan to meet Hunter". BBC Sport. 8 October 2004. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  24. ^ McEneaney, Barry (8 October 2004). "O'Sullivan and Hunter rocket to semis". RTÉ Sport. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  25. ^ a b McEneaney, Barry (8 October 2004). "Judge storms to semi-finals". RTÉ Sport. Archived from the original on 12 October 2004. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  26. ^ "O'Sullivan to meet McCulloch". BBC Sport. 9 October 2004. Archived from the original on 14 February 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  27. ^ "Judge falls at semi-final stage". RTÉ Sport. 9 October 2004. Archived from the original on 11 October 2004. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  28. ^ a b Yates, Phil (11 October 2004). "Calm O'Sullivan happy to take safe route home". The Times. Retrieved 10 September 2010. (Subscription required (help)). 
  29. ^ a b "O'Sullivan nets Preston win". BBC Sport. 10 October 2004. Archived from the original on 16 November 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  30. ^ "O'Sullivan wins Preston Grand Prix". RTÉ Sport. 10 October 2004. Retrieved 10 September 2010. [dead link]
  31. ^ a b "2004 Totesport Grand Prix results". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 5 November 2005. Retrieved 23 June 2012. 

Bibliography[edit]