2004 Masters Tournament

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2004 Masters Tournament
Tournament information
DatesApril 8–11, 2004
LocationAugusta, Georgia
33°30′11″N 82°01′12″W / 33.503°N 82.020°W / 33.503; -82.020Coordinates: 33°30′11″N 82°01′12″W / 33.503°N 82.020°W / 33.503; -82.020
Course(s)Augusta National Golf Club
Organized byAugusta National Golf Club
Tour(s)PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par72
Length7,290 yards (6,666 m)
Field93 players, 44 after cut
Cut148 (+4)
Prize fundUS$6,000,000
Winner's share$1,170,000
Champion
United States Phil Mickelson
279 (−9)
Location Map
Augusta National is located in the United States
Augusta National
Augusta National
Location in the United States
Augusta National is located in Georgia
Augusta National
Augusta National
Location in Georgia
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2005 →

The 2004 Masters Tournament was the 68th Masters Tournament, held April 8–11 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Phil Mickelson, 33, won his first major championship with a birdie on the final hole to win by one stroke over runner-up Ernie Els.[1][2] The purse was $6.0 million and the winner's share was $1.17 million.

This was the 50th consecutive and final Masters appearance for four-time champion Arnold Palmer.

Playoff alteration[edit]

Prior to this Masters, the sudden-death playoff was changed to begin on the 18th hole and alternate with the 10th hole. This new starting point was first used the following year in 2005. When the playoff format was changed to sudden-death for 1976, it began at the 10th hole, then went to the 11th, and was first used in 1979.[3] Prior to 1976, playoffs at Augusta were full 18-hole rounds on Monday, and the last was won by Billy Casper in 1970. The exception was the first playoff in 1935, which was 36 holes.

Course[edit]

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Tea Olive 435 4 10 Camellia 495 4
2 Pink Dogwood 575 5 11 White Dogwood 490 4
3 Flowering Peach 350 4 12 Golden Bell 155 3
4 Flowering Crab Apple 205 3 13 Azalea 510 5
5 Magnolia 455 4 14 Chinese Fir 440 4
6 Juniper 180 3 15 Firethorn 500 5
7 Pampas 410 4 16 Redbud 170 3
8 Yellow Jasmine 570 5 17 Nandina 425 4
9 Carolina Cherry 460 4 18 Holly 465 4
Out 3,640 36 In 3,650 36
Total 7,290 72

Field[edit]

1. Masters champions

Tommy Aaron, Charles Coody, Fred Couples (14,16,17), Ben Crenshaw, Nick Faldo, Raymond Floyd, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Jack Nicklaus, José María Olazábal (10), Mark O'Meara (10), Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Vijay Singh (10,12,14,15,16,17), Craig Stadler, Tom Watson, Mike Weir (10,11,14,15,16,17), Tiger Woods (2,3,4,10,12,14,15,16,17), Ian Woosnam, Fuzzy Zoeller

2. U.S. Open champions (last five years)

Retief Goosen (10,14,16,17)

3. The Open champions (last five years)

Ben Curtis (12,16,17), Ernie Els (10,11,14,16,17), Paul Lawrie (10)

4. PGA champions (last five years)

Rich Beem (10,16), Shaun Micheel (13,14,16,17), David Toms (10,11,14,16,17)

5. The Players Championship winners (last three years)

Davis Love III (10,12,14,15,16,17), Craig Perks, Adam Scott (15,16,17)

6. U.S. Amateur champion and runner-up

Nick Flanagan (a), Casey Wittenberg (a)

7. The Amateur champion

Gary Wolstenholme (a)

8. U.S. Amateur Public Links champion

Brandt Snedeker (a)

9. U.S. Mid-Amateur champion

Nathan Smith (a)

10. Top 16 players and ties from the 2003 Masters

Jonathan Byrd, Ángel Cabrera, K. J. Choi (14,16,17), Tim Clark (12), Jeff Maggert, Len Mattiace, Phil Mickelson (14,16,17), Scott Verplank (14,16,17)

11. Top eight players and ties from the 2003 U.S. Open

Freddie Jacobson (16,17), Stephen Leaney (16,17), Kenny Perry (14,16,17), Nick Price (14,16,17), Justin Rose

12. Top four players and ties from the 2003 Open Championship

Thomas Bjørn (16,17)

13. Top four players and ties from 2003 PGA Championship

Chad Campbell (14,15,16,17), Alex Čejka (16,17)

14. Top 40 players from the 2003 PGA Tour money list

Robert Allenby (16,17), Stuart Appleby (15,16,17), Briny Baird, Stewart Cink (17), Chris DiMarco (16,17), Bob Estes (16), Brad Faxon (16,17), Steve Flesch (17), Fred Funk (16,17), Jay Haas (16,17), Tim Herron (16), Charles Howell III (16,17), Jonathan Kaye (15,16,17), Jerry Kelly (16,17), Justin Leonard (16,17), J. L. Lewis, Shigeki Maruyama (16,17), Rocco Mediate (16,17), Tim Petrovic, Chris Riley (16,17), John Rollins, Jeff Sluman, Kirk Triplett (17), Bob Tway (16,17)

15. Top 10 players from the 2004 PGA Tour money list on March 28

John Daly

16. Top 50 players from the final 2003 world ranking

Michael Campbell, Paul Casey (17), Darren Clarke (17), Sergio García (17), Pádraig Harrington (17), Toshimitsu Izawa, Peter Lonard (17), Colin Montgomerie (17), Ian Poulter (17), Phillip Price, Eduardo Romero

17. Top 50 players from world ranking published March 28

Brian Davis, Todd Hamilton, Trevor Immelman, Craig Parry

18. Special foreign invitation

Zhang Lianwei

Round-by-round results[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, April 8, 2004
Friday, April 9, 2004

23-year-old Englishman Justin Rose posted a five-under 67 to lead after the first round. Americans Chris DiMarco and Jay Haas shot 69 (−3) and two-time U.S. Open champion Ernie Els was among a group tied for fourth with 70 (−2). Among the seven players tied at 71 (−1) was two-time Masters champion, José María Olazábal. Phil Mickelson shot an even-par 72, and three-time Masters champion Tiger Woods shot a 75 (+3). The winner of the previous major (2003 PGA Championship), Shaun Micheel, was at even-par 72. Play was suspended for roughly two hours due to rain, so 18 players completed their opening round on Friday morning.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Justin Rose  England 67 −5
T2 Chris DiMarco  United States 69 −3
Jay Haas  United States
T4 Alex Čejka  Germany 70 −2
Darren Clarke  Northern Ireland
Ernie Els  South Africa
Chris Riley  United States
T8 K. J. Choi  South Korea 71 −1
Charles Howell III  United States
Bernhard Langer  Germany
Colin Montgomerie  Scotland
José María Olazábal  Spain
Phillip Price  Wales
Kirk Triplett  United States

Second round[edit]

Friday, April 9, 2004

First round leader Rose put together another good round (71) to take the 36-hole lead at 138 (−6). Olazábal shot a 69 to close within two strokes of the lead in a tie for second with Alex Čejka, who shot 70. Mickelson, trying to remove the best player never to win a major championship label, moved into a share of fourth with a 69, alongside K. J. Choi. Davis Love III was one of two to shoot the round of the day with a 67 (−5), which moved him into a tie for sixth with Els, DiMarco, Charles Howell III, and 1992 champion Fred Couples. Most notables made the cut at 148 (+4), but among those failing to advance were defending champion Mike Weir and Ben Curtis, the 2003 Open Champion.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Justin Rose  England 67-71=138 −6
T2 Alex Čejka  Germany 70-70=140 −4
José María Olazábal  Spain 71-69=140
T4 K. J. Choi  South Korea 71-70=141 −3
Phil Mickelson  United States 72-69=141
T6 Fred Couples  United States 73-69=142 −2
Chris DiMarco  United States 69-73=142
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-72=142
Charles Howell III  United States 71-71=142
Davis Love III  United States 75-67=142

Amateurs: Snedeker (+4), Wittenberg (+4), Smith (+6), Flanagan (+8), Wolstenholme (+9).

Third round[edit]

Saturday, April 10, 2004

Mickelson moved from fourth to a share of the 54-hole lead with a three-under 69, while the top three golfers after round two collapsed. Rose shot an 81, Olazábal a 79, and Čejka a 78. This collective meltdown by the top three allowed Mickelson and DiMarco to rise to the top. DiMarco finished tied for the 54-hole lead with a four-under 68. Paul Casey put together a 68 as well to move within two strokes of the co-leaders at the end of the day. Els continued his steady play with a one-under 71 to move into a three-way tie for fourth. Kirk Triplett and Freddie Jacobson put themselves in contention at seventh and eighth, respectively.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Chris DiMarco  United States 69-73-68=210 −6
Phil Mickelson  United States 72-69-69=210
3 Paul Casey  England 75-69-68=212 −4
T4 K. J. Choi  South Korea 71-70-72=213 −3
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-72-71=213
Bernhard Langer  Germany 71-73-69=213
7 Kirk Triplett  United States 71-74-69=214 −2
8 Freddie Jacobson  Sweden 74-74-67=215 −1
T9 Stewart Cink  United States 74-73-69=216 E
Fred Couples  United States 73-69-74=216
Jay Haas  United States 69-75-72=216
Pádraig Harrington  Ireland 74-74-68=216
Davis Love III  United States 75-67-74=216
Nick Price  Zimbabwe 72-73-71=216

Final round[edit]

Sunday, April 11, 2004

Summary[edit]

In one of the most exciting back nines in Masters history, Mickelson dueled Els to claim his first major championship. Mickelson shot a final round 69, sealed with an 18-foot (5 m) birdie on the 18th green to win by a stroke. Playing two groups ahead of Mickelson, Els started the day at −3 and posted a 67 (−5). As Mickelson approached the final hole, Els' total of 280 (−8) appeared enough to at least get him into a playoff. Els stumbled out of the gate with two bogeys in his first five holes, but quickly regained his form. He collected two eagles on his round, at the par-5 8th and 13th holes. Els also connected on a birdie at the 15th to get him to −8. Seeing his first major possibly slip away with a 38 (+2) on his front nine, Mickelson had to match Els' fire on the back nine, and shot a bogey-free 31, with birdies on five of the final seven holes. Mickelson birdied the par-3 12th and par-5 13th. He briefly tied Els with his third consecutive birdie at the par-4 14th, then had a disappointing par on the par-5 15th. At the par-3 16th, Mickelson put his tee shot 20 feet (6 m) above the pin and holed the dramatic putt to tie for the lead. He remained tied heading to the final tee, and when his approach shot landed on the green, a winning putt was before him. As Mickelson sunk the putt, he jumped for joy as he won his first major title.[1][2]

K. J. Choi finished third, which was his best major finish, with a final round 69 to total 282 (−6). Sergio García shot the round of the tournament with a 66 (−6) to tie for fourth with two-time Masters champion Bernhard Langer. Four major champions, including two former Masters champions (Vijay Singh, Couples, Love, and Nick Price) were in the group who finished tied for sixth at 286 (−2). Woods' streak of not winning a major extended to seven with a disappointing 290 (+2), the same score tallied by first and second round leader Rose.

Final leaderboard[edit]

Champion
Silver Cup winner (low amateur)
(a) = amateur
(c) = past champion
Top 10
Place Player Score To par Money (US$)
1 United States Phil Mickelson 72-69-69-69=279 −9 1,170,000
2 South Africa Ernie Els 70-72-71-67=280 −8 702,000
3 South Korea K. J. Choi 71-70-72-69=282 −6 442,000
T4 Spain Sergio García 72-72-75-66=285 −3 286,000
Germany Bernhard Langer (c) 71-73-69-72=285
T6 England Paul Casey 75-69-68-74=286 −2 189,893
United States Fred Couples (c) 73-69-74-70=286
United States Chris DiMarco 69-73-68-76=286
United States Davis Love III 75-67-74-70=286
Zimbabwe Nick Price 72-73-71-70=286
Fiji Vijay Singh (c) 75-73-69-69=286
United States Kirk Triplett 71-74-69-72=286

Scorecard[edit]

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 4
United States Mickelson −6 −7 −6 −6 −5 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −6 −7 −7 −8 −8 −9
South Africa Els −3 −4 −3 −3 −2 −2 −3 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −7 −7 −8 −8 −8 −8
South Korea Choi −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −1 −1 −3 −3 −4 −5 −5 −6 −6 −6
Spain García +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +5 +4 +3 +2 +2 +2 +1 E +1 −1 −2 −3 −3
Germany Langer −4 −5 −5 −4 −4 −4 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −3 −4 −3 −3
England Casey −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −3 −3 −4 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2
United States DiMarco −6 −7 −6 −5 −5 −3 −2 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −2
United States Triplett −2 −2 −1 E E +1 E −1 −1 −1 E E −1 −1 E −2 −2 −2

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

Eagle Birdie Bogey Double bogey

Source:[1][4]

Quotes[edit]

  • "Is it his time? YES! At long last!"Jim Nantz's (CBS Sports) call as Mickelson sunk his birdie putt on the 18th hole to defeat Ernie Els and win the tournament.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Dulac, Gerry (April 12, 2004). "Finally!". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. C-1.
  2. ^ a b Shipnuck, Alan (April 19, 2004). "Amen". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  3. ^ "Masters playoff format is changed". CNN.com. April 7, 2004. Retrieved April 7, 2013.
  4. ^ "Leaderboard: 2004 Masters". Yahoo! Sports. April 11, 2004. Retrieved April 10, 2013.

External links[edit]

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