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2004 Pacific hurricane season

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2004 Pacific hurricane season
2004 Pacific hurricane season summary.jpg
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formed May 22, 2004
Last system dissipated October 26, 2004
Strongest storm
Name Javier
 • Maximum winds 150 mph (240 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure 930 mbar (hPa; 27.46 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions 17 official, 1 unofficial
Total storms 12
Hurricanes 6
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
3
Total fatalities 0
Total damage Unknown
Related articles
Pacific hurricane seasons
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

The 2004 Pacific hurricane season was notable in that no tropical cyclone of at least tropical storm intensity moved ashore, an unusual occurrence. The season officially began on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific; it officially ended in both basins on November 30.[1] These dates conventionally delimit the period during each year when a majority of tropical cyclones form. Activity throughout the year fell slightly below the long-term average, with 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. The season was reflected by an Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index of 71 units.

Impact throughout the season was minimal and no deaths were recorded. In early August, the remnants of Hurricane Darby aided in localized heavy rainfall in Hawaii, causing minor street and stream flooding; coffee and macadamia trees were damaged as well. In early September, Hurricane Howard resulted in significant flooding across Baja California Peninsula that damaged agricultural land and 393 homes. Large swells also resulted in about 1,000 lifeguard rescues in California. In mid-September, Javier caused three fishermen to go missing and helped alleviate a multi-year drought across the Southwest United States. It produced record rainfall in the state of Wyoming. In mid- to late October, Tropical Storm Lester and Tropical Depression Sixteen-E caused localized flooding; the latter may have produced a tornado near Culiacán, Mexico.

Seasonal forecasts[edit]

Predictions of tropical activity in the 2004 season
Source Date Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Ref
Average (1966–2003) 16 9 3
Record high activity 27 16 (tie) 11
Record low activity 8 (tie) 3 0(tie)
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
SMN January 2004 15 6 3 [2]
SMN May 2004 14 7 2 [3]
NOAA May 21, 2004 13–15 6-8 2-4 [4]
SMN August 2004 13 6 3 [5]
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Actual activity
12 6 3

In January 2004, the Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (SMN) released their first prediction for tropical cyclone activity throughout the Northeast Pacific. Based on a Neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a total of 15 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes was forecast.[2] These values were slightly altered in May to 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes, and 2 major hurricanes,[3] and again in August to 13 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes.[5]

On May 17, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued its seasonal forecast for the 2004 central Pacific season, predicting four or five tropical cyclones to form or cross into the basin. Likewise to the SMN, near average activity was expected largely as a result of a Neutral ENSO.[6] The organization issued its experimental eastern Pacific outlook on May 21, highlighting a 45 percent change of below-average activity, 45 percent chance of near-average activity, and only a 10 percent chance of above-average activity in the basin. A total of 13 to 15 named storms, 6 to 8 hurricanes, and 2 to 4 major hurricanes was forecast.[4]

Seasonal summary[edit]

Tropical Depression Sixteen-E (2004) Tropical Storm Lester (2004) Hurricane Javier (2004) Hurricane Howard (2004) Hurricane Darby (2004) Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale

The season's first storm, Agatha, developed on May 22.[7] No tropical cyclones developed during June, below the average of 2 named storms and 1 hurricane, and also the first time since 1969 that the month was cyclone-free.[8] Activity remained below average throughout the remainder of the season, with a total of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes compared to the long-term average of 16 named storms, 9 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes.[9] Overall wind energy output was reflected with an ACE index value of 71 units.[10] Although vertical wind shear was near average and ocean temperatures were slightly warmer than average south of Mexico, anomalously cool waters and drier than average air mass existed in the central portions of the eastern Pacific. Anomalously strong mid-level ridging extending from the Atlantic to northern Mexico steered a majority of the season's cyclones toward this inhospitable region and also acted to steer all the system of tropical storm intensity or stronger away from land.[11]

Systems[edit]

Tropical Storm Agatha[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Agatha 2004.jpg Agatha 2004 track.png
Duration May 22 – May 24
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

A nearly stationary trough stretched from the eastern Pacific into the eastern Caribbean Sea during mid-May. An ill-defined tropical wave crossed Central America on May 17 and interacted with the trough, eventually leading to the formation of a tropical depression at 00:00 UTC on May 22. The newly-formed cyclone moved northwest parallel to the coastline of Mexico while steadily organizing in a low wind shear regime, intensifying into Tropical Storm Agatha by 12:00 UTC that day and attaining peak winds of 60 mph (95 km/h) twelve hours later. Increasingly cool ocean temperatures and a drier air mass caused Agatha to weaken quickly thereafter, and it degenerated into a remnant low by 12:00 UTC on May 24. The post-tropical cyclone drifted aimlessly before dissipating well south of the Baja California Peninsula on May 26.[7]

Tropical Depression Two-E[edit]

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Tropical depression 2E 2004.jpg 2-E 2004 track.png
Duration July 2 – July 3
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

A westward-moving tropical wave from Africa crossed Central America into the eastern Pacific in late June, coalescing into a tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on July 2 well southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula.[12] Steered westward by low-level flow, the depression failed to organize amid wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures,[13] instead degenerating into a remnant low at 00:00 UTC on July 4. The post-tropical cyclone dissipated a day later.[12]

Tropical Depression One-C[edit]

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 01C 2004.jpg 1-C 2004 track.png
Duration July 5 – July 5
Peak intensity 30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

An organized region of convection within the Intertropical Convergence Zone developed into a tropical depression at 03:00 UTC on July 5 while located roughly 700 mi (1,125 km) south-southeast of Johnston Atoll, becoming the farthest-south-forming central Pacific tropical cyclone since 1992's Tropical Storm Hali. Steered westward, the depression failed to intensify due to its quick forward motion despite a seemingly favorable environment, and it quickly dissipated at 00:00 UTC on July 6.[14]

Tropical Storm Blas[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Blas 2004.jpg Blas 2004 track.png
Duration July 12 – July 15
Peak intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave crossed Central America on July 8, developing into a tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on July 12 while located about 335 mi (540 km) southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico; six hours later, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Blas. Steered swiftly northwestward around a mid-level ridge over the southwestern United States, the cyclone steadily intensified and reached peak winds of 65 mph (100 km/h) early on July 13 as a large and robust convective canopy became evident. Blas began a steady weakening trend as it tracked over increasingly cool sea surface temperatures, weakening to a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC on July 14 and degenerating into a large remnant low twelve hours later. The post-tropical cyclone decelerated and curved northeastward, dissipating well west of central Baja California early on July 19.[15]

Hurricane Celia[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Celia 2004.jpg Celia 2004 track.png
Duration July 19 – July 25
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  981 mbar (hPa)

A vigorous tropical wave entered the East Pacific on July 13, acquiring sufficient organization to be declared a tropical depression at 00:00 UTC on July 19 while located about 620 mi (1,000 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula. Directed west-northwest around a subtropical ridge, the cyclone steadily intensified amongst a favorable environment, becoming Tropical Storm Celia at 12:00 UTC that same day and further strengthening into a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale, the season's first, at 00:00 UTC on July 22. After attaining peak winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) six hours later, an increasingly unfavorable environment began to hinder the system. Celia weakened to a tropical storm at 18:00 UTC on July 22 and eventually degenerated into a remnant low at 00:00 UTC on July 26. The post-tropical cyclone dissipated about 1,740 mi (2,800 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula later that morning.[16]

Hurricane Darby[edit]

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Darby (2004).jpg Darby 2004 track.png
Duration July 26 – August 1
Peak intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  957 mbar (hPa)

A tropical depression formed at 12:00 UTC on July 26 while positioned about 760 mi (1,225 km) south-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico from a tropical wave that entered the eastern Pacific nearly a week prior. The system quickly intensified as it curved west-northwest around a subtropical ridge, becoming Tropical Storm Darby at 00:00 UTC on July 27 and strengthening into a Category 1 hurricane early the next day. After attaining its peak as the season's first major hurricane with winds of 120 mph (195 km/h), increasing wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures begin to weaken the cyclone. It weakened to a tropical storm at 12:00 UTC on July 30 and further to a tropical depression a day later as it entered the jurisdiction of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. At 12:00 UTC on August 1, Darby dissipated about 850 mi (1,370 km) east of the Hawaiian Islands.[17]

Although Darby produced no impacts to land as a tropical cyclone, its remnant moisture field combined with an upper-level trough over Hawaii to produce an unstable atmosphere. General rainfall amounts of 2–5 in (51–127 mm) were recorded across the Big Island and Oahu, with a localized peak of 9.04 in (230 mm) in Kaneohe; this led to flooding and several road closures. Minor stream flooding was observed on the southeast flank of Mount Haleakalā. A rainfall total of 3.06 in (78 mm) was recorded at the Honolulu International Airport, contributing to the wettest August on record in the city.[18] Some coffee and macadamia nut trees were damaged.[19]

Tropical Depression Six-E[edit]

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 6E 2004.jpg 6-E 2004 track.png
Duration August 1 – August 2
Peak intensity 30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min)  1008 mbar (hPa)

Operationally, an area of disturbed weather was thought to have coalesced into a tropical depression at 09:00 UTC on July 29 while located well southwest of the Baja California Peninsula. The depression was only expected to intensify slightly before entering cooler waters and interacting with outflow from nearby Hurricane Darby.[20] By late that evening, however, its presentation on satellite imagery more resembled a trough, and the NHC discontinued advisories.[21] In post-season analysis, the organization determined that the depression did not form until 06:00 UTC on August 1 and lasted but 24 hours.[22]

Tropical Storm Estelle[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Estelle 2004.jpg Estelle 2004 track.png
Duration August 19 – August 24
Peak intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  989 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave interacted with a disturbance embedded in the ITCZ in mid-August, leading to the designation of a tropical depression at 06:00 UTC on August 19 while located 1,440 mi (2,315 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The cyclone moved west-northwest following formation, steered around a subtropical ridge. It intensified into Tropical Storm Estelle at 06:00 UTC on August 20 and attained peak winds of 70 mph (110 km/h) at 12:00 UTC the next morning as it crossed into the central Pacific. Thereafter, increasing wind shear caused Estelle to a steady weakening trend. At 00:00 UTC on August 23, the cyclone decelerated to a tropical depression while turning west-southwest, and at 18:00 UTC the following day, it further degenerated into a remnant low. The post-tropical cyclone continued on a west-southwest trajectory prior to dissipating south-southeast of the Big Island at 00:00 UTC on August 26.[23]

Hurricane Frank[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Frank 2004.jpg Frank 2004 track.png
Duration August 23 – August 26
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  979 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave, the remnants of Tropical Storm Earl in the Atlantic, crossed into the eastern Pacific in mid-August and steadily organized to become a tropical depression at 06:00 UTC on August 23 well south of the coastline of Mexico. The depression intensified into Tropical Storm Frank six hours later as banding features and central convection increased. Steered northwest within a favorable environment, the cyclone rapidly intensified into a Category 1 hurricane by 18:00 UTC and ultimately attained peak winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) twelve hours later. Frank steadily weakened thereafter as it entered cooler ocean temperatures, degenerating into a remnant low at 06:00 UTC on August 26. The remnant low drifted southwest before diffusing into a trough well south of the Baja California Peninsula the following day.[24]

Tropical Depression Nine-E[edit]

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 9E 2004.jpg 9-E 2004 track.png
Duration August 23 – August 26
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave crossed Central America on August 15, only slowing organizing into a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC on August 23 while located about 920 mi (1,480 km) west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Steered north-northwest and eventually west, the cyclone failed to intensify further into a tropical storm amid cool sea surface temperatures and southerly wind shear, and it instead degenerated into a remnant low at 18:00 UTC on August 26. The post-tropical cyclone turned west-southwest before dissipating about 1,095 mi (1,760 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii early on August 28.[25]

Tropical Storm Georgette[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Georgette 2004.jpg Georgette 2004 track.png
Duration August 26 – August 30
Peak intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

A westward-moving tropical wave entered the eastern Pacific in late August, acquiring sufficient organization to be declared a tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on August 26 about 605 miles (975 km) south-southeast of the Baja California Peninsula. The depression intensified into Tropical Storm Georgette six hours later as its satellite presentation improved, and it reached peak winds of 65 mph (100 km/h) at 12:00 UTC on August 27. Increasingly hostile upper-level winds began to impinge on the west-northwest-moving tropical cyclone shortly thereafter, ultimately causing it to degenerate into a remnant low by 18:00 UTC on August 30. The post-tropical cyclone continued its forward course until dissipating early on September 3.[26]

Hurricane Howard[edit]

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Howard Sept 2 2004 1750Z.jpg Howard 2004 track.png
Duration August 30 – September 5
Peak intensity 140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min)  943 mbar (hPa)

A westward-moving tropical wave from Africa entered the eastern Pacific in late August, organizing into a tropical depression at 12:00 UTC on August 30 south of the coastline of Mexico. The depression intensified into Tropical Storm Howard twelve hours later and further developed into a hurricane at 06:00 UTC on September 1. On its northwest track, a favorable environment regime prompted the cyclone to begin a period of rapid intensification, and it attained its peak as a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 140 mph (220 km/h) at 12:00 UTC on September 2. Cooler ocean temperatures led to a steady weakening trend thereafter, and Howard degenerated into a remnant low at 18:00 UTC on September 5. The low turned southwest before dissipating over open waters on September 10.[27]

Although the storm remained offshore, the outer bands of the storm produced significant flooding across the Baja California peninsula,[28] which damaged agricultural land and at least 393 homes.[29] Swells reached 18 ft (5.4 m) along the Baja California coastline and 12 ft (3.7 m) along the California coastline; about 1,000 lifeguard rescues took place in California due to the waves.[30][31] Moisture from the storm enhanced rainfall in parts of Arizona, leading to minor accumulations.[32]

Hurricane Isis[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Isis (2004).jpg Isis 2004 track.png
Duration September 8 – September 16
Peak intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave, perhaps responsible for the formation of Hurricane Frances in the Atlantic, entered the eastern Pacific in early September, gaining sufficient organization to be declared a tropical depression at 06:00 UTC on September 8 about 530 miles (855 km) south of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The system tracked west, intensifying into Tropical Storm Isis twelve hours after designation but weakening back to a tropical depression early on September 10 amid persistent wind shear. Upper-level winds decreased by September 12, allowing Isis to regain tropical storm intensity by 00:00 UTC and eventually peak as a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 75 mph (120 km/h) at 12:00 UTC on September 15. After conducting a clockwise loop, the hurricane entered cooler waters and began to weaken; it degenerated into a remnant low at 18:00 UTC the next day. The low drifted southwest and then west before dissipating well east of Hawaii on September 21.[33]

Hurricane Javier[edit]

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane javier 2004.jpg Javier 2004 track.png
Duration September 10 – September 19
Peak intensity 150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  930 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave entered the eastern Pacific in early September, organizing into a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC on September 10 south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Under light shear, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Javier at 12:00 UTC the next morning and into a hurricane at 18:00 UTC on September 12. The cyclone soon began a period of rapid intensification as it alternated on a west-northwest to northwest course, ultimately peaking as a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) at 00:00 UTC on September 14 as a distinct pinhole eye became evident on satellite imagery. Cooler waters, strong southwesterly shear, and an eyewall replacement cycle all weakened Javier thereafter; it fell to tropical depression intensity early on September 19 before crossing Baja California and degenerated into a remnant low at 18:00 UTC that day over the Gulf of California. The low crossed the state of Sonora before dissipating over mountainous terrain on September 20.[34]

As a tropical cyclone, Javier produce moderate rainfall peaking at 3.14 in (80 mm) in Bacanuchi, Mexico.[35] Three fishermen went missing offshore the coastline due to high surf.[36] As a post-tropical cyclone, the storm's remnant moisture overspread the Southwest United States, alleviating a multi-year drought.[37] Accumulations peaked at 7 in (178 mm) in Walnut Creek, Arizona, with lighter totals across the Four Corners and upper Midwest.[38] The remnants of Javier produced 2 in (51 mm) of rain in Wyoming, cementing its status as the wettest tropical cyclone in the reliable record there.[39]

Tropical Storm Kay[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Storm Kay (2004).JPG Kay 2004 track.png
Duration October 4 – October 6
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

An area of disturbed weather developed within the ITCZ well southwest of mainland Mexico, coalescing into a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC on October 4. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Kay twelve hours later, and it attained peak winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) at 12:00 UTC the next morning as suggested by satellite intensity estimates. Moderate northerly shear caused core convection to decrease as the system moved west-northwest, resulting in Kay degenerating into a remnant low at 12:00 UTC on October 6 over open ocean. The low-level swirl curved southwestward and dissipated the next day.[40]

Tropical Storm Lester[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Storm Lester (2004).jpg Lester 2004 track.png
Duration October 11 – October 13
Peak intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

An area of disturbed weather south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec organized into a tropical depression at 18:00 UTC on October 11. Steered northwest to west-northwest by a mid-level ridge to its north and a broad cyclonic circulation to its southwest, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Lester at 18:00 UTC the next day. The system was initially forecast to become a hurricane amid light shear; however, interaction with the coastline of Mexico and the nearby cyclonic circulation instead caused Lester to weaken. Observations from a reconnaissance aircraft indicated the storm degenerated into a trough at 18:00 UTC on October 13.[41]

As the cyclone paralleled the coastline of Mexico, a tropical storm warning was hoisted from Punta Maldonado to Lázaro Cárdenas. Rainfall accumulations of 3–5 in (76–127 mm) were observed across Oaxaca and Guerrero, leading to localized flooding.[41]

Tropical Depression Sixteen-E[edit]

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
16-E Oct 25 2004 1810Z.jpg 16-E 2004 track.png
Duration October 25 – October 26
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave entered the eastern Pacific in mid-October, interacting with two previous tropical waves that resulted in a large area of disturbed weather. The system organized into a tropical depression at 00:00 UTC on October 25 about 315 miles (505 km) south-southeast of the Baja California Peninsula. Initially, the cyclone was characterized by a large area of deep convection enhanced from an upper-level trough. This same trough soon imparted strong wind shear, preventing intensification. The depression moved into Sinaloa early that same day and dissipated over the Sierra Madre Occidental at 18:00 UTC on October 26.[42]

The depression produced locally heavy rainfall across western Mexico, resulting in some localized flooding.[42] Culiacán International Airport recorded a peak wind gust of 80 mph (129 km/h), suggesting a tornado may have occurred nearby.[43] The remnant mid-level circulation associated with the cyclone interacted with a frontal system to produce strong thunderstorms across the southern Great Plains.[42]

Tropical Depression[edit]

On August 14, the Japan Meteorological Agency had briefly stated that Tropical Storm Malakas had exited the West Pacific basin and into the Central Pacific basin as a weakening tropical depression.[44]

Storm names[edit]

The following names were used for named storms that formed in East Pacific in 2004. This is the same list used in the 1998 season. No names were retired by the World Meteorological Organization in the spring of 2005, therefore this list was re-used in the 2010 season.[45]

Although Isis did not result in significant damage or casualties (it was not retired during the WMO's annual meeting in 2005), the organization determined in 2015 that it would retire the name, deeming its usage inappropriate in light of the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant (commonly referred to as ISIS).[46]

  • Agatha
  • Blas
  • Celia
  • Darby
  • Estelle
  • Frank
  • Georgette
  • Howard
  • Isis
  • Javier
  • Kay
  • Lester
  • Madeline (unused)
  • Newton (unused)
  • Orlene (unused)
  • Paine (unused)
  • Roslyn (unused)
  • Seymour (unused)
  • Tina (unused)
  • Virgil (unused)
  • Winifred (unused)
  • Xavier (unused)
  • Yolanda (unused)
  • Zeke (unused)

For storms that form in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility, encompassing the area between 140 degrees west and the International Date Line, all names are used in a series of four rotating lists. The next four names that were slated for use in 2004 are shown below, however none of them were used.[45]

  • Ioke (unused)
  • Kika (unused)
  • Lana (unused)
  • Maka (unused)

Season effects[edit]

This is a table of all the storms that have formed in the 2004 Pacific hurricane season. It includes their duration, names, landfall(s), denoted in parentheses, damages, and death totals. Deaths in parentheses are additional and indirect (an example of an indirect death would be a traffic accident), but were still related to that storm. Damage and deaths include totals while the storm was extratropical, a wave, or a low, and all the damage figures are in 2004 USD.

Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale
TD TS C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
2004 Pacific hurricane statistics
Storm
name
Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affected Damage
(millions USD)
Deaths


Agatha May 22– 24 Tropical storm 60 (95) 997 None None None
Two-E July 2 – 3 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1007 None None None
One-C July 5 Tropical depression 30 (45) 1007 None None None
Blas July 12 – 15 Tropical storm 65 (100) 991 Northern Mexico None None
Celia July 19 – 25 Category 1 hurricane 85 (140) 981 None None None
Darby July 26 – August 1 Category 3 hurricane 120 (195) 957 None Minimal None
Six-E August 1 – 2 Tropical depression 30 (45) 1008 None None None
Estelle August 19 – 24 Tropical storm 70 (110) 989 None None None
Frank August 23 – 26 Category 1 hurricane 85 (140) 979 Baja California Peninsula None None
Nine-E August 23 – 26 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1005 None None None
Georgette August 26 – 30 Tropical storm 65 (100) 995 None None None
Howard August 30 – September 5 Category 4 hurricane 140 (220) 943 Baja California Peninsula, Western United States Minimal None
Isis September 8 – 16 Category 1 hurricane 75 (120) 987 None None None
Javier September 10 – 19 Category 4 hurricane 150 (240) 930 Baja California, Southwestern United States None None
Kay October 4 – 6 Tropical storm 45 (75) 1004 None None None
Lester October 11 – 13 Tropical storm 50 (85) 1000 Southwestern Mexico None None
Sixteen-E October 25 – 26 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1004 Northern Mexico None None
Season Aggregates
17 systems May 22 – October 26   150 (240) 930 Minimal None

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions". Central Pacific Hurricane Center. May 12, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Informe sobre el pronóstico de la temporada de ciclones del 2004 (Report) (in Spanish). Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. January 2004. Archived from the original on April 14, 2005. Retrieved December 31, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Informe sobre el Pronóstico de la Temporada de Ciclones del 2004 (Report) (in Spanish). Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. May 2004. Archived from the original on April 14, 2005. Retrieved December 31, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b NOAA Issues 2004 Experimental Eastern Pacific Hurricane Outlook (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. May 21, 2004. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Informe sobre el Pronóstico de la Temporada de Ciclones del 2004 (Report) (in Spanish). Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. August 2004. Archived from the original on April 14, 2005. Retrieved December 31, 2016. 
  6. ^ NOAA Expects Near Average Central Pacific Hurricane Season (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. May 17, 2004. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Lixion A. Avila (June 2, 2004). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Agatha (PDF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  8. ^ Lixion A. Avila; Stacy R. Stewart (July 1, 2004). Tropical Weather Summary: July (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  9. ^ Hurricane Specialist Unit (December 1, 2004). Tropical Weather Summary: November (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  10. ^ National Hurricane Center; Hurricane Research Division; Central Pacific Hurricane Center. "The Northeast and North Central Pacific hurricane database 1949–2016". United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service.  A guide on how to read the database is available here.
  11. ^ Hurricane Specialist Unit (August 2, 2005). "Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2004". National Hurricane Center. American Meteorological Society. 137: 1. Bibcode:2006MWRv..134.1026A. doi:10.1175/MWR3095.1. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Miles B. Lawrence (July 17, 2004). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Depression Two-E (PDF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  13. ^ Lixion A. Avila (July 2, 2004). "Tropical Depression Two-E Discussion Number 2". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
  14. ^ Andy Nash; Tim Craig; Roy Matsuda; Jeffrey Powell (February 2005). Overview of the 2004 Central North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Season: Tropical Depression 01-C (Report). Honolulu, Hawaii: Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 26, 2015. 
  15. ^ Richard J. Pasch (August 5, 2004). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Blas (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 1–3. Retrieved May 26, 2015. 
  16. ^ Stacy R. Stewart (October 12, 2004). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Celia (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 1, 2. Retrieved May 26, 2015. 
  17. ^ Jack L. Beven II (December 17, 2004). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Darby (PDF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. p. 1. Retrieved May 26, 2015. 
  18. ^ Excessive Rainfall from the Remnants of Darby (Report). National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Honolulu, Hawaii. Retrieved October 16, 2016. 
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