2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season

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2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season
2005-2006 South Pacific cyclone season summary.jpg
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formed November 30, 2005
Last system dissipated April 21, 2006
Strongest storm
Name Wati
 • Maximum winds 155 km/h (100 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure 950 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions 15
Tropical cyclones 5
Severe tropical cyclones 3
Total fatalities None Reported
Total damage $26,000 (2006 USD)
Related articles
South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons
2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08

The 2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 1, 2005 and ended on April 30, 2006. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" runs from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006.[1]

Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand.[1]

Seasonal forecasts[edit]

Source
Record
Tropical
Cyclone
Severe
Tropical Cyclone
Ref
Record high: 1997–98:16 1982–83:10 [2]
Record low: 2003–04: 3 1994-95: 1 [2]
RSMC Nadi 7–9 - [3]
Activity during the season: 5 3

During October 2005, both RSMC Nadi and New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research issued seasonal forecasts which contained information on what was expected to occur during the 2005-06 tropical cyclone season. Both agencies expected that the season would see a near average amount of tropical cyclone activity due there being no El Niño or La Nina. As a result of these conditions RSMC Nadi predicted that between 7-9 tropical cyclones would develop while NIWA did not predict how many tropical cyclone there would be during the season. RSMC Nadi also reported that Fiji had a higher chance of being hit by a tropical cyclone this season than during recent previous seasons. NIWA also predicted that there was an average risk of a tropical cyclone coming within 550 km (340 mi), of: Fiji, Tonga, Niue, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Wallis and Futuna, the Southern Cook Islands, Samoa, and New Zealand.[3][4]

Seasonal summary[edit]

Cyclone Larry Cyclone Vaianu (2006) Cyclone Urmil (2006) Cyclone Tam (2006) Tropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basins

Systems[edit]

Tropical Depression 01F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration November 30 – December 2
Peak intensity Winds not specified  1005 hPa (mbar)

Formed on November 30 and dissipated on December 2, 2005.

Tropical Depression 02F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration December 3 – December 6
Peak intensity Winds not specified  1002 hPa (mbar)

Formed on December 3 and dissipated on December 6, 2005.

Tropical Depression 03F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration December 8 – December 16
Peak intensity 35 km/h (25 mph) (10-min)  1001 hPa (mbar)

Formed on December 8 and dissipated on December 18, 2005.

Tropical Cyclone Tam[edit]

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Cyclone Tam 2006.jpg Tam 2006 track.png
Duration January 6 – January 14
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  987 hPa (mbar)

Tam originated as Tropical Depression 04F near 15°S 179.5°E on January 6. The system then lingered around for a few days, appearing to significantly weaken, only to strengthen later. As Tam moved southeastward on January 12, a gale warning was issued for Tonga and later for Niue as well as American Samoa. Tam accelerated towards south-southeast and became extratropical on January 14. Tam was the first tropical cyclone to occur within the area of responsibility of TCWC Wellington this year.

Tropical Depression 05F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration January 10 – January 13
Peak intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  996 hPa (mbar)

Formed on January 10 and dissipated on January 13, 2006.

Tropical Cyclone Urmil[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Cyclone Urmil 2006.jpg Urmil 2006 track.png
Duration January 13 – January 15
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  975 hPa (mbar)

The second named storm of the season formed out of a weak tropical disturbance on January 13.[5] Later that day, the RSMC in Nadi began issuing advisories on the system and classified it as Tropical Depression 06F while located about 370 km (230 mi) west of Pago Pago, American Samoa. With favorable environmental conditions in the wake of Tropical Cyclone Tam, the depression rapidly organized, strengthening into a Category 1 cyclone six hours after the first advisory was issued and was given the name Urmil.[5][6] Several hours later, the JTWC also began issuing advisories on Urmil, designating it as Tropical Cyclone 07P.[7] On January 14, Urmil underwent a brief period explosive deepening,[6] attaining its peak intensity of 110 km/h (70 mph 10-min).[5] Not long after reaching its peak, increased wind shear, cooler waters, and faster forward motion caused the storm to weaken. By January 15, Urmil transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. Later that day, the remnants of the storm were absorbed into the mid-latitude westerlies.[6]

Tropical Cyclone Urmil had little impact on land, with gale-force winds being felt only in Tonga.[8] Heavy rains exaggerated flooding produced by Cyclone Tam earlier in January and caused minor crop damages.[9][10]

Tropical Depression 07F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration January 15 – January 16
Peak intensity 30 km/h (15 mph) (10-min) 

The seventh depression of the season developed on January 15 as Urmil was dissipating. A weak system, 07F formed out of a slow moving tropical disturbance about 790 km (490 mi) north of Fiji. The system peaked in intensity with winds of 30 km/h (15 mph) later that day. On January 16, the low dissipated about 325 km (200 mi) west-northwest of Fiji.[6]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Jim[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
STC Jim 2005.jpg Jim 2006 track.png
Duration January 30 – February 3
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  955 hPa (mbar)

Cyclone Jim originated in the Australian region, and moved into Fiji's area of responsibility on January 30. Jim gradually turned south-southeastward and became extratropical on February 1.

The extratropical remnants of Jim (08F) lingered around and then moved northwest. On February 3, 08F was again mentioned in a bulletin issued by Fiji. However, on the following day, the number 08F was dropped in Fiji bulletin while Brisbane called it a tropical low instead of Ex-Jim. The low was quasi-stationary and gradually weaken afterwards. It is questionable whether this system is a continuation of Jim.

Despite being well to the west of that country, Cyclone Jim was blamed for extensive flooding in Fiji, with the western coast of the island of Viti Levu – including the city of Lautoka – inundated by floodwaters on January 29.[11] No fatalities were reported in any of the areas affected by the cyclone.

Tropical Depression 09F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration January 30 – January 30
Peak intensity Winds not specified  994 hPa (mbar)

Early on January 30, RSMC Nadi reported that Tropical Depression 09F had formed about 230 km, (145 mi), to the northeast of New Caledonia.[6] As the convection was detached from the low level circulation center, and was being steered into an environment of increasing vertical windshear, RSMC Nadi immediately issued their final advisory on the system.[12]

Tropical Depression 10F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration February 2 – February 4
Peak intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  998 hPa (mbar)

The tenth depression of the season formed on February 2 about 150 km (95 mi) southwest of Niue. High wind shear prevented significant strengthening,[13] with winds peaking at 55 km/h (35 mph) and a minimum pressure of 998 hPa (mbar).[14] Tracking in an erratic, southerly direction, the depression slowly weakened as convection was displaced by wind shear. Tropical Depression 10F was last monitored on February 4 about 740 km (460 mi) southeast of Tongatapu.[13]

Tropical Depression 11F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration February 8 – February 10
Peak intensity 35 km/h (25 mph) (10-min) 

Formed on February 8 and dissipated on February 10, 2006.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Vaianu[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Tropical cyclone vaianu (2006).jpg Vaianu 2006 track.png
Duration February 9 – February 22
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  965 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Depression 12F formed near 14.5°S 176.1°W on February 10 and a tropical cyclone alert was raised in Tonga. This is the third tropical system to threaten Tonga this season. At that time, another Tropical Depression (11F) was to its south causing unstable movements of the two depressions. On the next day, 12F became the dominant system and moved south. Strengthening into Tropical Cyclone Vaianu, it turned southwest and passed between Fiji and Tonga. On February 13, Vaianu resumed a southward track and reached hurricane intensity. Vaianu then struck the Tonga islands as a Category 1 cyclone on the Saffir-Simpson scale, knocking down power lines and flattening crops, such as banana and mango trees. In Nukuʻalofa, low lying areas were shut down because of flooding. On February 13, Vaianu reached its peak intensity of 85 mp/h, but these peak winds were well away from the Tonga and Fiji islands, but Tonga still felt Vaianu's winds. Then, the cyclone accelerated towards the southeast, entered TCWC Wellington's area of responsibility and became extratropical on February 16.

Tropical Depression 13F[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Temporary cyclone south.svg 
Duration February 19 – February 26
Peak intensity 35 km/h (25 mph) (10-min) 

Formed on February 19 and dissipated on February 26, 2006.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Wati[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Tropical Cyclone Wati 2006.jpg Wati 2006 track.png
Duration March 17 – March 28
Peak intensity 155 km/h (100 mph) (10-min)  955 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Depression 16F formed on March 17 and strengthened into Tropical Cyclone Wati on March 19 north of New Caledonia. It moved westwards and slowly strengthened into a Category 3 cyclone on the Australian scale before coming to a near standstill over the Coral Sea. After remaining stationary for most of March 22, Wati took a southeasterly course on March 23, gaining speed and continuing that course on March 24. A cyclone watch was issued for Lord Howe Island and a cyclone warning was issued for Norfolk Island. Wati passed between the two islands and became extratropical on March 25.

The remains of Wati brought heavy rain and strong winds to the North Island of New Zealand on March 26, with gusts of 140 km/h reported at Cape Reinga.[15]

Other systems[edit]

Tropical Depression 13F was first noted by the FMS during February 19, while it was located about 675 km (420 mi) to the southeast of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.[16][17]

During March 13, the FMS reported that Tropical Depression 14F had developed about 225 km (140 mi) to the southeast of Port Vila, Vanuatu.[18][19] The system was slowly moving within an area of high vertical wind shear with atmospheric convection, displaced about 220 km (135 mi) to the east of the low level circulation centre.[18] Over the next couple of days the system moved southwards and never became well organised, before it was last noted by the FMS during March 16.[19] The precursor tropical low to Severe Tropical Cyclone Larry moved into the basin, from the Australian region and was assigned the designator 16F by the FMS during March 16.[19][20] However, during that day the system recurved and moved back into the Australian region during the next day, where it later made landfall near Innisfail, Queensland and caused widespread damage to Queensland.[19][20] During April 20, the FMS reported that Tropical Depression 17F had developed to the east of the International Dateline, about 500 km (310 mi) to the southeast of Suva, Fiji.[21][22] Over the next day the system moved south-eastwards and remained weak and exposed, with deep convection displaced to the south and east of the low level circulation centre.[21][23] The system was subsequently last noted by the FMS during April 21, as it left the tropics.[22][24] During the final days of April, several depressions to the east of the International Dateline were noted by the FMS, however, none of these were referred to as tropical depressions.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Tropical Cyclone Operational Plan for the South Pacific and South-East Indian Ocean" (PDF). WMO. 2006. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 11, 2008. Retrieved August 15, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b Climate Services Division (October 26, 2010). Tropical Cyclone Guidance for Season 2010/11 for the Fiji and the Southwest Pacific (PDF) (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 27, 2012. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Climate Services Division (November 1, 2005). Fiji Islands Weather Summary October 2005 Volume:5/26 Issue:5 (PDF) (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. p. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 1, 2011. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  4. ^ Salinger, Jim; Burgess, Stuart; Renwick, Jim (2005). "Tropical cyclone guidance for the 2005/06 season". Island Climate Update. National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research. 61 (October 2005). Archived from the original on August 1, 2011. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c Fiji Meteorological Service (2006). "Tropical Cyclone Summary: 2005–2006 Season" (PDF). World Meteorological Organization. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 27, 2011. Retrieved May 12, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Gary Padgett (April 25, 2006). "Monthly Tropical Weather Summary for January 2006". Typhoon 2000. Archived from the original on February 24, 2009. Retrieved March 11, 2009. 
  7. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (January 16, 2006). "JTWC Advisories for Tropical Cyclone 07P (Urmil)". Australia Severe Weather. Retrieved March 11, 2009. 
  8. ^ Kevin Vang (January 14, 2006). "Cyclone Urmil develops from Tropical Depression 06F; Urmil over Tafahi and Niuatoputapu". AFAP Asia-Pacific Disaster Alerts. Archived from the original on August 7, 2008. Retrieved March 11, 2009. 
  9. ^ Staff Writer (January 16, 2006). "Cyclones cause minimal damage to Niuatoputapu in northern Tonga". Radio New Zealand. Retrieved March 11, 2009. 
  10. ^ Staff Writer (January 27, 2006). "Hurricanes fizzle out in Samoa, where some of the policemen wear skirts". Lohontan Valley News. Retrieved March 11, 2009. 
  11. ^ http://www.pacificislands.cc/pina/pinadefault2.php?urlpinaid=19927
  12. ^ "Severe Weather Warnings issued on 2006-01-30". MT Archive. January 30, 2006. Retrieved March 31, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b Gary Padgett (May 2, 2006). "Monthly Tropical Weather Summary for February 2006". Typhoon 2000. Retrieved May 13, 2009. 
  14. ^ Gary Padgett (March 13, 2006). "Monthly Tropical Cyclone Tracks for February 2006". Typhoon 2000. Retrieved May 13, 2009. 
  15. ^ zBeston, Anne (March 27, 2006). "Cyclone Wati lashes out at North Island". NZ Herald News. Retrieved February 15, 2009. 
  16. ^ RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre (February 19, 2006). "Tropical Disturbance Summary February 19, 2006 23z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  17. ^ Padgett, Gary (April 28, 2006). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary: February 2006". Australian Severe Weather. Archived from the original on October 24, 2015. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  18. ^ a b RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre (March 13, 2006). "Tropical Disturbance Summary March 13, 2006 23z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  19. ^ a b c d Padgett, Gary (July 17, 2006). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary: March 2006". Australian Severe Weather. Archived from the original on August 30, 2015. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  20. ^ a b "The Australian Tropical Cyclone Database" (CSV). Australian Bureau of Meteorology.  A guide on how to read the database is available here.
  21. ^ a b RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre (April 20, 2006). "Tropical Disturbance Summary April 20, 2006 22z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b c Padgett, Gary (August 18, 2006). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary: April 2006". Australian Severe Weather. Archived from the original on August 30, 2015. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  23. ^ RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre (April 21, 2006). "Tropical Disturbance Summary April 21, 2006 09z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 
  24. ^ RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre (April 21, 2006). "Tropical Disturbance Summary April 21, 2006 21z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved October 24, 2015. 

External links[edit]