2006 QV89

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2006 QV89
Discovery[1]
Discovered byCatalina Sky Survey (703)
Discovery date29 August 2006
Designations
MPC designation2006 QV89
Apollo, NEO[2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 2019-Apr-27 (JD 2458600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 6
Observation arc10 days
Aphelion1.2847 AU (192,190,000 km) (Q)
Perihelion0.92454 AU (138,309,000 km) (q)
1.1920 AU (178,320,000 km) (a)
Eccentricity0.22441 (e)
1.30 yr
217.85° (M)
Inclination1.0714° (i)
166.06° (Ω)
236.72° (ω)
Earth MOID10200 km
Jupiter MOID3.9 AU (580,000,000 km)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions~30 m (98 ft)[3]
25.3[2]

2006 QV89 (also written 2006 QV89) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 30 meters (98 feet) in diameter. It was discovered on 29 August 2006 when the asteroid was about 0.03 AU (4,500,000 km; 2,800,000 mi) from Earth and had a solar elongation of 150 degrees. The asteroid has a short 10 day observation arc and has not been detected since 2006. The asteroid is estimated to make a 2019 closest approach to Earth around 23−27 September at a distance of roughly 0.04 AU (6,000,000 km; 3,700,000 mi).[4]

Possible Earth impact[edit]

2006 QV89 has a low 1.07° orbital inclination with respect to the Ecliptic plane and an Earth-MOID of only 10200 km.[2] Where Earth will be is known. Where precisely the asteroid will be on its orbit is not. As a short observation arc having not been observed since 2006, the Sentry Risk Table shows an estimated 1 in 9100 chance of the asteroid impacting Earth on 9 September 2019.[3] The nominal JPL Horizons 9 September 2019 Earth distance is 0.05 AU (7,500,000 km; 4,600,000 mi) with a 3-sigma uncertainty of ±10 million km.[5] NEODyS also lists the nominal 9 September 2019 Earth distance as 0.05 AU (7,500,000 km; 4,600,000 mi).[6] The European Space Agency lists the odds of impact at a comparable 1 in 7300 on 9 September 2019.[7]

A Monte Carlo simulation using Solex 12 with 1000 clones of the asteroid shows that the asteroid's possible positions overlap Earth.[8]

The asteroid should come to opposition (opposite the Sun in the sky) around the end of July 2019 at an estimated apparent magnitude of ~22.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC 2006-Q58 : 2006 QV89". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2006-08-30. Retrieved 2019-03-19. (K06Q89V)
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2006 QV89)" (last observation: 2006-09-08; arc: 10 days). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Archived from the original on 2019-03-18. Retrieved 2019-03-19.
  3. ^ a b "Earth Impact Risk Summary: 2006 QV89". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Archived from the original on 2018-12-29. Retrieved 2019-03-19.
  4. ^ "2006QV89 Close Approaches". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Archived from the original on 2019-03-19. Retrieved 2019-03-19.
  5. ^ Go to JPL Horizons. Table Settings: only need "20. Observer range & range-rate" AND "39. Range & range-rate 3-sigmas".
    RNG_3sigma = uncertainty range in km. (Soln.date: 2019-May-30 generates RNG_3sigma = 8948856 for 2019-Sep-09)
  6. ^ a b "2006QV89 Ephemerides for July-Sept 2019". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Archived from the original on 2019-03-19. Retrieved 2019-03-19.
  7. ^ "esa Risk List". European Space Agency. Archived from the original on 2019-06-06. Retrieved 2019-06-06.
  8. ^ Solex clones (Peter Thomas)