2007 AT&T 250

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2007 AT&T 250
Race details
Race 17 of 35 of the 2007 NASCAR Busch Series season
A layout of the oval shaped Milwaukee Mile. Pit lane juts into the infield a quarter way into the front stretch, and extends into the first turn
Map of the Milwaukee Mile
Date June 23, 2007 (2007-06-23)
Official name AT&T 250
Location Milwaukee Mile in West Allis, Wisconsin
Course Permanent racing facility
1.000 mi (1.609 km)
Distance 250 laps, 250.0 mi (402.25 km)
Weather Temperatures hovering between 66 °F (19 °C) and 55 °F (13 °C); wind speeds reaching up to 13.8 miles per hour (22.2 km/h)[1]
Average speed 85.203 mph (137.121 km/h)
Pole position
Driver Joe Gibbs Racing
Time 29.608
Most laps led
Driver Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing
Laps 123
Winner
No. 20 Aric Almirola Joe Gibbs Racing
Television in the United States
Network ESPN2
Announcers Allen Bestwick, Rusty Wallace, Andy Petree[2]

The 2007 AT&T 250 was a NASCAR Busch Series stock car race that took place on June 23, 2007. Held at the Milwaukee Mile in West Allis, Wisconsin, the race was the 17th of 35 in the 2007 NASCAR Busch Series season. Aric Almirola of Joe Gibbs Racing (JGR) was the listed winner of the race, Richard Childress Racing's Scott Wimmer finished second, and Braun Racing's Jason Leffler finished third.

The race became controversial because of a driver change made by the No. 20 JGR team. Almirola qualified the car on pole position, though Gibbs intended to have NASCAR Nextel Cup Series regular Denny Hamlin run the race. The Cup Series was racing that weekend at Sonoma Raceway in Sonoma, California, and Hamlin could not make it from Sonoma to the track in time for the start of the race. Almirola was thus forced to start the race and ran the first 59 laps before he was pulled out of the car under caution; Hamlin finished the race and came from behind to win after losing a lap to the leaders during the driver change. NASCAR rules state that the driver who starts the race gets credit for the result, making Almirola the official race winner. The driver change frustrated Almirola, who proceeded to leave the track before the race ended, and it was further criticized by ESPN writer Terry Blount, who called the substitution "a Busch-league move."[3]

The win for which Almirola was given credit was the first of his Busch Series career. Carl Edwards, who led nearly half of the race for Roush Fenway Racing (RFR), recovered from a flat tire to finish eighth, maintaining a significant lead in the Drivers' Championship. Edwards's No. 60 RFR team also maintained their Owners' Championship lead, and Chevrolet continued to lead the Manufacturers' Championship.

Background[edit]

Scott Wimmer in his blue racing suit with a white chest filled with sponsors, wearing sunglasses and a black Fastenal baseball cap
Wisconsin native Scott Wimmer (pictured in 2009) entered the race optimistic about performing well at his home track.

The Busch Series first came to the Milwaukee Mile in the 1984 and 1985 seasons before taking a seven-year absence from visiting the track. It returned to the schedule in 1993 and had been on the series calendar every year since then leading up to the 2007 edition of the race.[4] The track itself was originally built as a horse racing track, and it later held its first automobile race in 1903, making it the oldest motor racing track in the United States.[5]

Entering the race, the last two Busch Series races at Milwaukee had been won by Johnny Sauter and Paul Menard, both from Wisconsin.[6] Four Wisconsin-born drivers entered the race hoping to continue the trend: Scott Wimmer, Todd Kluever, Kelly Bires, and Frank Kreyer.[6] Wimmer, who entered the race with three consecutive top-five finishes and five straight top-tens,[7] stated, "It's really exciting anytime I go back to Wisconsin for racing, especially The Milwaukee Mile. I've been going there since I can remember and watching a lot of great drivers racing out there."[7] He also expressed excitement at the prospect of winning the upcoming race, saying, "It would really be neat to win a race there. I think that any Wisconsin driver, no matter what series, wants to win there."[6]

Carl Edwards led the Drivers' Championship entering the race with 2,534 points. Dave Blaney followed in second with 1,833, while Kevin Harvick was third with 1,798. David Reutimann, Regan Smith, David Ragan, Greg Biffle, Marcos Ambrose, Bobby Hamilton Jr., and Jason Leffler rounded out the top ten.[8] Jack Roush, owner of Edwards' No. 60 car, led the Owners' Championship, also with 2,534 points. Richard Childress's No. 29 team, shared by Wimmer and Jeff Burton,[9] followed in second with 2,323, while Joe Gibbs's No. 20, Childress's No. 21, and DeLana Harvick's No. 33 teams completed the top-five.[10] Chevrolet led the Manufacturers' Championship with 115 points; Ford, Dodge, and Toyota followed with 109, 69, and 59 respectively.[11] Menard, the defending race winner, did not participate.[6]

Standings before the race[edit]

Report[edit]

Practice and qualifying[edit]

Almirola, with spiked hair, smiles at the camera while wearing his black racing suit. The filled grandstands are in the background.
Aric Almirola qualified the car on pole position and was expected to hand the car over to Denny Hamlin for the race.

Two practice sessions were held the morning and afternoon before the evening race.[2] With a time of 29.981 seconds, Wimmer was the quickest in the opening session ahead of Aric Almirola, Stephen Leicht, Reutimann, and Shane Huffman.[12] Positions six through ten were occupied by Hamilton, Erik Darnell, Travis Kvapil, Todd Bodine, and Kelly Bires.[12] In the second practice session, Wimmer was once again quickest with a lap time of 29.821 seconds, followed by Almirola, Johnny Benson Jr., Brad Coleman, Jason Keller, Leffler, Darnell, Huffman, Scott Lagasse Jr., and Leicht.[13]

Forty-four cars entered qualifying;[14] due to NASCAR's qualifying procedure, only forty-three could race. Almirola qualified his No. 20 car on pole position with a time of 29.608 seconds.[15] Almirola was set to step aside for the race, however, as Nextel Cup Series regular Denny Hamlin was scheduled to travel from Sonoma Raceway to compete in the Saturday night event in Milwaukee. Almirola, who also qualified Hamlin's car on the pole the year before, commented, "Man, two poles in a row at Milwaukee and I don't get to race. Something's got to be set for that. I'll sit on the pit box and watch. I've got a lot to learn about racing these Busch cars and Denny is really, really good, so I'll just sit there and listen and learn all I can from Denny."[16]

Almirola was joined on the front row by Leffler, while Wimmer, Coleman, and Huffman rounded out the top-five qualifiers.[15] Bodine, Benson, Reutimann, Edwards, and Lagasse made up positions six through ten.[15] Danny Efland was the only driver who failed to qualify as he did not set a qualifying time.[17] Edwards replaced Kvapil in the No. 60 car after practice, qualifying in ninth. Like Hamlin, Edwards was also traveling from Sonoma and nearly missed qualifying, later remarking, "One minute later, we wouldn't have made it."[18]

Race[edit]

NASCAR driver Denny Hamlin waves to fans before a race
Denny Hamlin stepped into Almirola's car on lap 59 and proceeded to win the race.

The 250-lap race began at 8:00 p.m. EDT, and was televised live in the United States on ESPN2.[2] Hamlin's helicopter could not find a place to land in the infield; the helicopter pad was blocked by parked cars,[19] forcing Hamlin to land elsewhere and arrive late via ground transportation.[20] Hamlin was thus unable to start the race in Almirola's car,[18] forcing Almirola to start the race himself.[18] Ragan, the third Nextel Cup regular traveling to the track from Sonoma along with Hamlin and Edwards, replaced Darnell in Roush's No. 6 car; Ragan was forced to move to the rear of the field because of the driver swap and an engine change, as was Chase Miller who went to a backup car.[21]

Almirola maintained his lead from pole position for the first 43 laps before being passed by Edwards.[18] The caution had been displayed on lap 30 due to oil on the track in turn four,[21] and shortly after the lap 43 restart, Edwards took over the lead of the race.[21] On lap 57, Ron Hornaday Jr. was involved in an accident, prompting the second caution.[18] It was under this caution period that the Gibbs team elected to make the driver change, and Hamlin took over driving the car for the remainder of the race.[18]

Hamlin lost a lap and fell to 34th place,[22] remaining a lap down until lap 149 when he received the free pass, allowing him to return to the lead lap. Edwards, meanwhile, continued to lead the race for a total of 123 laps, before Mike Wallace assumed the race lead.[21] Six laps later, on lap 173, Hamlin completed his comeback drive to retake the lead for the No. 20 team.[21] Edwards, meanwhile, suffered misfortune in the form of a flat right rear tire around the same period in the race,[23] forcing him to pit with 77 laps remaining.[22]

On lap 223, Kreyer was involved in an accident, causing the caution to be displayed again.[21] Wimmer assumed the lead after pit stops, holding it until the caution came out again for Kevin Hamlin's accident.[21] On the restart, Wimmer battled for the lead with Leffler, while Hamlin made it three-wide to retake the lead with 13 laps to go.[18] Marc Mitchell, Richard Johns, and Brent Sherman crashed on lap 244, requiring another caution to be displayed.[21] The race restarted with four laps remaining, with Hamlin retaining the lead to the finish.[18] Since NASCAR rules credit the finishing position to the starting driver, Almirola was awarded the win.[24] Wimmer, Leffler, and Coleman followed in second through fourth,[18] while Keller, Bodine, Reutimann, Edwards, Benson, and Huffman completed the top-ten.[21] Hamlin's margin of victory over Wimmer was .502 seconds.[21]

Post-race comments[edit]

"I didn't want to do it. I knew he would be really upset."

Hamlin after the race, explaining his hesitancy to get in the car[25]

Hamlin appeared in Victory Lane to represent Almirola's first career win in front of a crowd of 41,900 attendants, earning $66,823 for the victory; both the win and prize money were credited to Almirola,[21] while team president J. D. Gibbs confirmed that Almirola would receive the winner's check.[26] Hamlin credited Almirola for putting the team in a good position prior to the race, saying Almirola "did all the hard work."[25] Runner-up Wimmer was taken aback that Gibbs elected to make the driver change: "I was surprised they did it, because Aric was running a good race."[25] He also believed that fewer caution periods may have given him a better chance to win the race, saying, "I just drove as hard as I could, and unfortunately we weren't as good on the short runs. We'd get going after 20 laps, and I didn't need those cautions. Maybe we'll get a win one day. Maybe we won't. I don't know."[20] Gibbs explained that Almirola was frustrated after being taken out of the car: "He's upset. I left a message for him [Saturday] night. I know he's upset. I would be too if I'm in his shoes."[26] He also expressed relief that Hamlin was able to win the race, arguing, "Thank goodness he won. It would have looked bad if he didn't."[3]

When explaining why the team made the decision to put Hamlin in the car, Gibbs said, "I told those guys as a group, if you think Denny can get in the car and win the race, let's go. Let's do that. If you don't think he can do that, let Aric run it out. Our guys kind of thought about it as a group and said, 'OK, we think Denny can run well and we're fast enough to win the race.' That was a huge discouragement of course to Aric."[26] Other reasons included sponsorship obligations with Rockwell Automation, which sponsored the No. 20 car. Coleman, a Joe Gibbs Racing teammate, believed, "That might have had something to do with it."[25] Almirola also expressed his belief that Rockwell, who are headquartered in Wisconsin,[26] wanted Hamlin to drive during the race. "I totally understand the Gibbs side of the situation. You need that Cup superstar to sell sponsorship. It's not easy to sell sponsorship for somebody who hasn't proven themselves yet, and I understand that. At the time, in the heat of the moment, I was deep in the battle of the race. I didn't totally agree and understand the situation. But looking back on it now, I understand it. Rockwell's invested a lot in Denny Hamlin and Joe Gibbs Racing, so they deserved everything they got there at Milwaukee. They deserved to have their racecar in the spotlight and I was happy that I got the pole for them and that Denny won the race."[27] He also stated that he did not consider himself to have won his first career race. "I feel like I was a part of it, but by no way, shape or form do I feel like that was my first victory. I feel like my first victory is still to come and I'll actually be in the car when it crosses the start-finish line for that one."[27]

Edwards, with close cropped hair, waves while wearing his red, sponsor filled racing suit
Carl Edwards remained the Drivers' Championship leader after the race with 2,686 points.

The driver change also attracted criticism from ESPN journalist Terry Blount, who called it "a Busch-league move," writing, "As if we don't have enough Cup dominance in the Busch Series, now they're replacing Busch drivers after a race starts."[3] He continued, "Almirola was furious. Good for him. He should be furious. If a driver isn't angry about getting pulled from the car in the middle of a race, then he needs to take up another profession."[3]

Edwards, who led the most laps and recovered to finish eighth after dominating the early stages of the race, insisted the night was "still fun," saying, "It was pretty frustrating. But you know what's cool? We raced hard and we had a lot of fun racing here at Milwaukee. Congratulations to Denny Hamlin. I can't believe they did a driver switch and he still won the race; that's pretty awesome....we just kind of had a bad luck night."[22]

The result kept Edwards in the lead in the Drivers' Championship with a new total of 2,686 points. Reutimann and Ragan improved their positions to second and third (albeit 776 and 846 points behind) respectively, while Blaney and Kevin Harvick fell to fourth and fifth. Leffler, Ambrose, Hamilton, Smith, and Leicht rounded out the top ten.[28] Roush's No. 60 team also maintained the lead in a much closer Owners' Championship with 2,686 points; Wimmer's strong second-place finish left Childress's No. 29 team only 188 points behind Roush, while Gibbs's No. 20, Childress's No. 21, and DeLana Harvick's No. 33 remained third, fourth, and fifth.[29] Chevrolet maintained their lead in the Manufacturers' Championship with 124 points; Ford, Dodge, and Toyota followed with 113, 72, and 65 respective points.[30]

Results[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Qualifying results
Grid No. Driver Team Manufacturer Time Speed
1 20 Aric Almirola Joe Gibbs Racing Chevrolet 29.608 121.589
2 38 Jason Leffler Braun Racing Toyota 29.613 121.568
3 29 Scott Wimmer Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 29.642 121.449
4 18 Brad Coleman Joe Gibbs Racing Chevrolet 29.675 121.314
5 88 Shane Huffman JR Motorsports Chevrolet 29.718 121.139
6 10 Todd Bodine Braun Racing Toyota 29.777 120.899
7 1 Johnny Benson Jr. Phoenix Racing Chevrolet 29.797 120.817
8 99 David Reutimann Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 29.824 120.708
9 60 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford 29.835 120.664
10 41 Scott Lagasse Jr. Chip Ganassi Racing Dodge 29.866 120.538
11 35 Bobby Hamilton Jr. Team Rensi Motorsports Ford 29.901 120.397
12 59 Marcos Ambrose JTG Racing Ford 29.924 120.305
13 6 Erik Darnell Roush Fenway Racing Ford 29.952 120.192
14 47 Kelly Bires JTG Racing Ford 29.952 120.192
15 90 Stephen Leicht Robert Yates Racing Ford 29.971 120.116
16 66 Steve Wallace Rusty Wallace Racing Dodge 29.980 120.080
17 37 Bobby East Brewco Motorsports Ford 30.018 119.928
18 22 Mike Bliss Fitz Motorsports Dodge 30.026 119.896
19 9 Chase Miller Evernham Motorsports Dodge 30.050 119.800
20 7 Mike Wallace Phoenix Racing Chevrolet 30.059 119.765
21 27 Jason Keller Brewco Motorsports Ford 30.111 119.558
22 42 Kevin Hamlin Chip Ganassi Racing Dodge 30.181 119.280
23 16 Todd Kluever Roush Fenway Racing Ford 30.201 119.201
24 21 Tim McCreadie Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 30.202 119.197
25 25 Richard Johns Team Rensi Motorsports Ford 30.207 119.178
26 70 Mark Green ML Motorsports Chevrolet 30.233 119.075
27 77 Ron Hornaday Jr. Kevin Harvick Incorporated Chevrolet 30.234 119.071
28 33 Cale Gale Kevin Harvick Incorporated Chevrolet 30.238 119.055
29 14 Kyle Krisiloff Carl A. Haas Motorsports Ford 30.260 118.969
30 36 Brent Sherman McGill Motorsports Chevrolet 30.368 118.546
31 11 Marc Mitchell CJM Racing Chevrolet 30.606 117.624
32 56 Frank Kreyer Mac Hill Motorsports Chevrolet 30.712 117.218
33 72 D. J. Kennington MacDonald Motorsports Dodge 30.800 116.883
34 49 Derrike Cope Jay Robinson Racing Chevrolet 30.879 116.584
35 0 Eric McClure D.D.L. Motorsports Chevrolet 30.889 116.546
36 44 Mike Harmon Mike Harmon Racing Chevrolet 31.194 115.407
37 89 Morgan Shepherd Faith Motorsports Dodge 31.763 115.339
38 28 Robert Richardson Jr. Jay Robinson Racing Chevrolet 31.953 112.665
39 52 Ian Henderson Jimmy Means Racing Ford 32.201 111.798
40 71 Trevor Boys MacDonald Motorsports Chevrolet 32.493 110.793
41 76 Jerick Johnson Team Johnson Racing Chevrolet 32.613 110.385
42 58 Chris Horn Horn Auto Racing Chevrolet 32.616 110.375
43 00 Mike Potter Davis Motorsports Chevrolet 32.674 110.179
Failed to qualify
44 01 Danny Efland D.D.L. Motorsports Chevrolet No time set
Source:[15][17]

Race results[edit]

Race results
Pos. Grid No. Driver Team Manufacturer Laps Points
1 1 20 Aric Almirola1 Joe Gibbs Racing Chevrolet 250 1902
2 3 29 Scott Wimmer Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 250 1752
3 2 38 Jason Leffler Braun Racing Toyota 250 165
4 4 18 Brad Coleman Joe Gibbs Racing Chevrolet 250 160
5 21 27 Jason Keller Brewco Motorsports Ford 250 155
6 6 10 Todd Bodine Braun Racing Toyota 250 150
7 8 99 David Reutimann Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 250 146
8 9 60 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford 250 1563
9 7 1 Johnny Benson Jr. Phoenix Racing Chevrolet 250 138
10 5 88 Shane Huffman JR Motorsports Chevrolet 250 134
11 20 7 Mike Wallace Phoenix Racing Chevrolet 250 1352
12 13 6 David Ragan Roush Fenway Racing Ford 250 127
13 11 35 Bobby Hamilton Jr. Team Rensi Motorsports Ford 250 124
14 15 90 Stephen Leicht Robert Yates Racing Ford 250 121
15 12 59 Marcos Ambrose JTG Racing Ford 250 118
16 22 42 Kevin Hamlin Chip Ganassi Racing Dodge 250 115
17 19 9 Chase Miller Evernham Motorsports Dodge 249 112
18 23 16 Todd Kluever Roush Fenway Racing Ford 249 109
19 25 25 Richard Johns Team Rensi Motorsports Ford 249 106
20 31 11 Marc Mitchell CJM Racing Chevrolet 249 103
21 26 70 Mark Green ML Motorsports Chevrolet 248 100
22 17 37 Bobby East Brewco Motorsports Ford 248 97
23 28 33 Cale Gale Kevin Harvick Incorporated Chevrolet 248 94
24 29 14 Kyle Krisiloff Carl A. Haas Motorsports Ford 248 91
25 18 22 Mike Bliss Fitz Motorsports Dodge 247 88
26 33 72 D. J. Kennington MacDonald Motorsports Dodge 247 85
27 16 66 Steve Wallace Rusty Wallace Racing Dodge 246 82
28 24 21 Tim McCreadie Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 241 79
29 40 71 Trevor Boys MacDonald Motorsports Chevrolet 241 76
30 14 47 Kelly Bires JTG Racing Ford 241 73
31 35 0 Eric McClure D.D.L. Motorsports Chevrolet 238 70
32 30 36 Brent Sherman McGill Motorsports Chevrolet 236 67
33 38 28 Robert Richardson Jr. Jay Robinson Racing Chevrolet 232 64
34 32 56 Frank Kreyer Mac Hill Motorsports Chevrolet 217 61
35 10 41 Scott Lagasse Jr. Chip Ganassi Racing Dodge 163 58
36 27 77 Ron Hornaday Jr. Kevin Harvick Incorporated Chevrolet 56 55
37 39 52 Ian Henderson Jimmy Means Racing Ford 29 52
38 36 44 Mike Harmon Mike Harmon Racing Chevrolet 10 49
39 37 89 Morgan Shepherd Faith Motorsports Ford 9 46
40 42 58 Chris Horn Horn Auto Racing Chevrolet 4 43
41 41 76 Jerick Johnson Team Johnson Racing Chevrolet 4 40
42 43 00 Mike Potter Davis Motorsports Chevrolet 4 37
43 34 49 Derrike Cope Jay Robinson Racing Chevrolet 0 34
Source:[21][31]
1 Denny Hamlin relieved Almirola on lap 59; due to NASCAR rules, Almirola was given credit for the finish
2 Includes five bonus points for leading a lap
3 Includes ten bonus points for leading the most laps

Standings after the race[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Weather History for West Allis, WI". Old Farmer's Almanac. Yankee Publishing. Archived from the original on March 3, 2018. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "The Race: 2007 AT&T 250 - The Milwaukee Mile". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Blount, Terry (June 26, 2007). "Hamlin subbing for Almirola was a Busch-league move". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 17, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  4. ^ "Milwaukee Mile – NASCAR Xfinity Series Race Recaps". Racing-Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  5. ^ Jenkins, Chris (July 11, 2015). "IndyCar future at Milwaukee Mile remains uncertain". USA Today. Gannett Company. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  6. ^ a b c d Pate, Josh (June 22, 2007). "Wisconsin natives seek to continue winning trend". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 11, 2007.
  7. ^ a b Bolick, Tony (June 21, 2007). "Wimmer finds success in NBS return with Childress". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Sporting News Wire Service. Archived from the original on August 10, 2007.
  8. ^ a b "2007 Meijer 300 Presented By Oreo – Points Standings after this Race". Racing-Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  9. ^ "Holiday Inn Renews With RCR". MRN.com. October 24, 2007. Archived from the original on December 27, 2017. Retrieved December 26, 2017.
  10. ^ a b "2007 Owner Driver Standings: Meijer 300 presented by Oreo". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on June 19, 2007.
  11. ^ a b "Ford Matches Chevy With 7 Wins; Only Six Points Out Of Manufacturer Lead". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  12. ^ a b "Practice One Speeds". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 2, 2007.
  13. ^ "Practice Two Speeds". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 2, 2007.
  14. ^ "Qualifying Order". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on June 29, 2007.
  15. ^ a b c d "Race Lineup". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on June 26, 2007.
  16. ^ Mejia, Diego (June 23, 2007). "Almirola on Milwaukee Busch pole". Autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  17. ^ a b "2007 AT&T 250 qualifying results". Racing-Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Tardy Hamlin relieves Almirola, wins at The Milwaukee Mile". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. June 25, 2007. Archived from the original on December 17, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  19. ^ Jenkins, Chris (June 24, 2007). "Hamlin Lands Safely in Victory Lane at Busch Race". Indiana Gazette. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
  20. ^ a b Kallmann, Dave (June 25, 2007). "Hamlin finishes off what Almirola starts to win Busch race". Columbus Telegram. Archived from the original on February 20, 2018. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "2007 AT&T 250". Racing-Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c "Hamlin Wins ATT 250 For Almirola". MRN.com. June 23, 2007. Archived from the original on December 17, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  23. ^ Osborne, Jesse (June 24, 2007). "Fashionably late Hamlin wins Milwaukee Mile Busch race". La Crosse Tribune. Archived from the original on February 20, 2018. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  24. ^ Jensen, Tom (June 25, 2015). "Throwback Thursday: Joe Gibbs Racing pulls Aric Almirola from winning car mid-race". Fox Sports. Archived from the original on July 1, 2015. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  25. ^ a b c d Jenkins, Chris (June 24, 2007). "Hamlin gets unofficial Milwaukee Busch victory". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Associated Press. Archived from the original on July 11, 2007.
  26. ^ a b c d Caraviello, David (June 25, 2007). "Notebook: Gibbs reiterates support for upset Almirola". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 11, 2007.
  27. ^ a b Aumann, Mark (June 28, 2007). "Almirola understands but still unhappy with relief". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  28. ^ a b "2007 Official Driver Standings: AT&T 250". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 1, 2007.
  29. ^ a b "Owner Points Following Race". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 26, 2017.
  30. ^ a b "Chevy Answers With Another Win To Extend Manufacturer Lead". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  31. ^ "Results". NASCAR.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on July 1, 2007.