2008 Tropical Storm Fay tornado outbreak

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2008 Tropical Storm Fay tornado outbreak
FEMA - 37552 - Damage to a trailer from a Tornado in Florida.jpg
Damage from an EF1 tornado in Brevard County, Florida
TypeTornado outbreak
DurationAugust 18–27, 2008
Tornadoes confirmed50
Max. rating1EF2 tornado
Duration of tornado outbreak2~10 days
Damage$4.2 million
Casualties0 fatalities (5 injuries)
1Most severe tornado damage; see Enhanced Fujita scale
2Time from first tornado to last tornado

From August 18–27, 2008, Tropical Storm Fay produced 50 tornadoes as it meandered across the Southeastern United States.

Background[edit]

Track of Tropical Storm Fay

On August 6, 2008, a tropical wave emerged over the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa. Tracking westward, the system gradually organized into a tropical depression on August 15 just west of Puerto Rico. After making landfall in the Dominican Republic, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Fay. Turning west-northwestward, the system crossed Haiti and Cuba while gradually intensifying. The system emerged over the Florida Straits on August 18 and struck Key West before turning northeastward and striking the southern Florida Peninsula. Despite moving onshore, the system continued to organize, developing an eye and attaining peak winds just below hurricane-force.[1]

Weakening steering currents caused Fay's motion to become slow and erratic, with the system emerging back over the Atlantic Ocean only to turn westward and strike Florida again by August 21. This slow motion continued for the remainder of the storm's track as it briefly moved back over the Gulf of Mexico before turning inland again. Weakening to a tropical depression, Fay moved slowly northwest before turning northeast over Mississippi. It into an extratropical cyclone on August 27 before being absorbed by a larger system over Kentucky the following day.[1]

Daily statistics[edit]

Daily statistics
Date Total Enhanced Fujita scale rating Deaths Injuries
 EF0   EF1   EF2   EF3   EF4   EF5 
August 18 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 19 4 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2
August 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 22 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 23 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 24 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
August 25 12 5 6 1 0 0 0 0 0
August 26 14 6 7 1 0 0 0 0 3
August 27 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 50 32 15 3 0 0 0 0 5

List of tornadoes[edit]

List of confirmed tornadoes during the 2008 Tropical Storm Fay tornado outbreak[nb 1]
F# Location County / Parish State Coord. Date Time (UTC) Path length Max width Summary
EF0 N of Big Coppitt Key Monroe FL 24°43′N 81°22′W / 24.71°N 81.37°W / 24.71; -81.37 (Big Coppitt Key (August 18, EF0)) August 18 1655–1657 0.24 miles (390 m) 50 yd (46 m) A waterspout formed north of the Seven Mile Bridge and moved onshore on Big Pine Key and downed a few trees.[2]
EF0 WSW of Summerland Key Monroe FL 24°40′N 81°28′W / 24.66°N 81.47°W / 24.66; -81.47 (Summerland Key (August 18, EF0)) August 18 1800–1802 0.07 miles (110 m) 10 yd (9.1 m) A waterspout was first observed near Ramrod Key before it moved onshore on Summerland Key. Several large tree limbs were snapped, a cable service line was torn from a house, and a 4x4 post was blown off a dock. A weather station recorded a 62 mph (100 km/h) gust during the event.[3]
EF0 Hallandale Beach area Broward FL 25°59′N 80°08′W / 25.98°N 80.13°W / 25.98; -80.13 (Hallandale Beach (August 18, EF0)) August 18 2130–2131 0.25 miles (0.40 km) 25 yd (23 m) A brief tornado tracked through Hallandale Beach, damaging a patio screen, flipping several boats, and downing trees.[4]
EF2 SSE of Wellington Palm Beach FL 26°37′N 80°14′W / 26.62°N 80.23°W / 26.62; -80.23 (Wellington (August 19, EF2)) August 19 0529–0533 2.72 miles (4.38 km) 100 yd (91 m) A strong tornado tracked through several subdivisions of Wellington, causing significant damage. The worst damage occurred at the Palm Beach Equine Clinic where two stables lost their roof, power poles were snapped, and many trees were downed. A heavy trailer at a polo club was tossed 40 yd (37 m) and an apartment building near Folkstone Circle lost 70 percent of its roof tiles. Damage from the tornado amounted to $1.25 million[5]
EF0 Stuart area Martin FL 27°09′N 80°13′W / 27.15°N 80.22°W / 27.15; -80.22 (Stuart (August 19, EF0)) August 19 1411–1412 0.02 miles (32 m) 30 yd (27 m) A brief tornado touched down in Stuart, damaging a panel truck and a nearby service station awning.[6]
EF0 NW of White City St. Lucie FL 27°23′N 80°22′W / 27.39°N 80.37°W / 27.39; -80.37 (White City (August 19, EF0)) August 19 1635–1636 0.08 miles (130 m) 30 yd (27 m) A brief tornado damaged the roof and interior ceiling of a warehouse in Fort Pierce.[7]
EF1 W of Micco Brevard FL 27°53′N 80°31′W / 27.88°N 80.51°W / 27.88; -80.51 (Micco (August 19, EF1)) August 19 1745–1750 0.33 miles (0.53 km) 30 yd (27 m) A brief tornado struck the community of Barefoot Bay, destroying 9 mobile homes and damaging 59 more. The most severe damage to the homes consisted of collapsed exterior walls and removal of roofs. Dozens of smaller structures were impacted and two people sustained minor injuries. Damage amounted to $420,000.[8]
No tornadoes touched down on August 20 and 21 as the right-front quadrant of Fay moved over the Atlantic
EF0 ESE of Bakersville St. Johns FL 29°53′N 81°26′W / 29.88°N 81.43°W / 29.88; -81.43 (Bakersville (August 22, EF0)) August 22 1715–1716 0.59 miles (0.95 km) 10 yd (9.1 m) Brief tornado reported by law enforcement.[9]
EF0 Isle of Palms South Duval FL 30°16′N 81°26′W / 30.26°N 81.44°W / 30.26; -81.44 (Isle of Palms South (August 22, EF0)) August 22 1740–1742 0.17 miles (270 m) 100 yd (91 m) Brief tornado snapped and twisted the tops of pine trees.[10]
EF0 NE of Bostwick Clay FL 29°51′N 81°36′W / 29.85°N 81.60°W / 29.85; -81.60 (Bostwick (August 22, EF0)) August 22 2125–2126 0.1 miles (160 m) 100 yd (91 m) A waterspout reported along the St. Johns River briefly moved onshore in Clay County.[11]
EF0 Fleming Island area Clay FL 30°02′N 81°43′W / 30.04°N 81.71°W / 30.04; -81.71 (Fleming Island (August 22, EF0)) August 22 2140–2147 1.32 miles (2.12 km) 100 yd (91 m) Tornado caused widespread tree damage and impacted one home in Fleming Island.[12]
EF0 NW of Lake Rosalie Polk FL 27°56′N 81°25′W / 27.94°N 81.42°W / 27.94; -81.42 (Lake Rosalie (August 22, EF0)) August 22 2225–2227 0.72 miles (1.16 km) 30 yd (27 m) Waterspout formed over Lake Rosalie and briefly moved onshore near Camp Rosalie before dissipating. Five structures in the camp sustained minor roof damage.[13]
EF1 N of Staunton Cook GA 31°17′N 83°28′W / 31.29°N 83.47°W / 31.29; -83.47 (Staunton (August 23, EF1)) August 23 2050–2053 1.4 miles (2.3 km) 75 yd (69 m) Tornado formed near U.S. Route 41 and tracked northwest, passing over Interstate 75. Numerous trees were downed and a barn sustained heavy damage along its path.[14]
EF0 ENE of Palatka Municipal Airport Putnam FL 29°40′N 81°40′W / 29.66°N 81.66°W / 29.66; -81.66 (Palatka Municipal Airport (August 23, EF0)) August 23 2153–2201 3.74 miles (6.02 km) 100 yd (91 m) Tornado began as a waterspout near Highway 17 and tracked north toward Bostwick. Public reports indicated a tornado was on the ground, though no damage occurred.[15]
EF0 ESE of Capps Jefferson FL 30°25′N 83°56′W / 30.41°N 83.93°W / 30.41; -83.93 (Capps (August 23, EF0)) August 23 2212–2213 0.2 miles (320 m) 50 yd (46 m) A short-lived tornado snapped the tops off many pine trees.[16]
EF0 WNW of Ware Elmore AL 32°28′N 86°07′W / 32.46°N 86.11°W / 32.46; -86.11 (Ware (August 24, EF0)) August 24 1907–1907 0.04 miles (64 m) 20 yd (18 m) Public report of a brief tornado in the Emerald Valley area of Elmore County; no damage occurred.[17]
EF0 SW of Wetona Coosa AL 32°46′N 86°22′W / 32.76°N 86.36°W / 32.76; -86.36 (Wetona (August 24, EF0)) August 24 1912–1912 0.01 miles (16 m) 20 yd (18 m) Public report of a brief tornado near the Coosa–Elmore County line close to the Coosa River; no damage occurred.[18]
EF0 Arley area Winston AL 34°05′N 87°13′W / 34.09°N 87.22°W / 34.09; -87.22 (Arley (August 24, EF0)) August 24 2324–2324 0.05 miles (80 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado touched down in Arley and downed several street signs, one of which was blown into a power pole and snapped it.[19]
EF0 SSE of Prattville-Grouby Field Autauga AL 32°10′N 86°26′W / 32.16°N 86.43°W / 32.16; -86.43 (Prattville-Grouby Field (August 25, EF0)) August 25 1225–1225 0.05 miles (80 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado snapped several trees along Interstate 65.[20]
EF0 NE of Corcoran Pike AL 32°52′N 85°57′W / 32.86°N 85.95°W / 32.86; -85.95 (Corcoran (August 25, EF0)) August 25 1318–1319 0.45 miles (0.72 km) 75 yd (69 m) Brief tornado destroyed an outbuilding and damaged several structures; 15 trees were snapped along its path.[21]
EF1 WNW of Arguta Dale AL 31°35′N 85°10′W / 31.58°N 85.16°W / 31.58; -85.16 (Arguta (August 25, EF1)) August 25 1320–1322 0.44 miles (0.71 km) 75 yd (69 m) Brief tornado uprooted several trees and heavily damaged a barn.[22]
EF1 SE of St. Clair Springs St. Clair AL 33°45′N 86°23′W / 33.75°N 86.38°W / 33.75; -86.38 (St. Clair Springs (August 25, EF1)) August 25 1556–1606 3.38 miles (5.44 km) 100 yd (91 m) Tornado touched down northeast of the Saint Clair Correctional Facility and tracked northwest. Numerous trees were downed along its path, some of which fell on homes and caused damage.[23]
EF1 SSE of Allgood Blount AL 33°52′N 86°28′W / 33.86°N 86.47°W / 33.86; -86.47 (Allgood (August 25, EF1)) August 25 1625–1626 0.41 miles (0.66 km) 60 yd (55 m) Tornado touched down along the shore of Inland Lake and tracked across it before moving back on land. Numerous trees were downed, two buildings sustained minor damage, and a few power poles were downed.[24]
EF2 NW of Chulafinnee Cleburne AL 33°35′N 85°41′W / 33.58°N 85.68°W / 33.58; -85.68 (Chulafinnee (August 25, EF2)) August 25 1706–1707 0.46 miles (0.74 km) 400 yd (370 m) Brief but strong tornado caused significant damage to a gas station and convenience store and downed 100–200 trees.[25]
EF1 SW of Old Davisville Calhoun AL 33°38′N 85°41′W / 33.64°N 85.68°W / 33.64; -85.68 (Old Davisville (August 25, EF1)) August 25 1711–1711 0.01 miles (16 m) 50 yd (46 m) Brief tornado significantly damaged one home.[26]
EF1 NNE of Choccolocco Calhoun AL 33°41′N 85°41′W / 33.68°N 85.69°W / 33.68; -85.69 (Choccolocco (August 25, EF1)) August 25 1719–1720 1.1 miles (1.8 km) 250 yd (230 m) Brief tornado destroyed an auto shop and damaged three homes. Approximately 50–100 trees were snapped or uprooted along its path.[27]
EF0 ESE of Jacobs Jackson FL 30°53′N 85°22′W / 30.88°N 85.36°W / 30.88; -85.36 (Jacobs (August 25, EF0)) August 25 2226–2227 0.2 miles (320 m) 50 yd (46 m) Brief tornado with no damage.[28]
EF0 SSW of Enon Pike AL 31°49′N 85°44′W / 31.81°N 85.73°W / 31.81; -85.73 (Enon (August 25, EF0)) August 25 2258–2258 0.01 miles (16 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado snapped or uprooted several trees.[29]
EF1 SSE of Gordon Houston AL 31°07′N 85°05′W / 31.12°N 85.08°W / 31.12; -85.08 (Gordon (August 25, EF1)) August 25 0026–0027 0.2 miles (320 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado downed several trees, one of which fell on a mobile home and destroyed it.[30]
EF0 N of Enterprise Miller GA 31°10′N 84°50′W / 31.17°N 84.83°W / 31.17; -84.83 (Enterprise (August 25, EF0)) August 25 0202–0205 0.95 miles (1.53 km) 75 yd (69 m) Tornado damaged a barn, mobile home, and irrigation pivot and uprooted trees.[31]
EF0 SW of Percale Monroe GA 33°04′N 83°48′W / 33.06°N 83.80°W / 33.06; -83.80 (Percale (August 26, EF0)) August 26 1610–1611 0.29 miles (0.47 km) 50 yd (46 m) Brief tornado with no damage.[32]
EF0 NW of Fort Lawn Chester SC 34°43′N 80°55′W / 34.72°N 80.92°W / 34.72; -80.92 (Ft. Lawn (August 26, EF0)) August 26 1618–1618 0.1 miles (160 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado downed several trees and power lines.[33]
EF1 NNE of Gainesville Hall GA 34°22′N 83°22′W / 34.37°N 83.36°W / 34.37; -83.36 (Gainesville (August 26, EF1)) August 26 1625–1627 1.14 miles (1.83 km) 200 yd (180 m) Tornado downed about 200 trees; 20 homes sustained damage from fallen trees.[34]
EF1 S of Reed Creek to NE of Townville Hart, Anderson GA, SC 34°26′N 82°55′W / 34.44°N 82.92°W / 34.44; -82.92 (Reed Creek (August 26, EF1)) August 26 1818–1836 12.44 miles (20.02 km) 30 yd (27 m) Tornado moved along an intermittent path near the Georgia–South Carolina border, downing many trees and power lines. Some structural damage occurred near Reed Creek.[35] After crossing Lake Hartwell, the tornado moved into South Carolina and remained over mostly wooded areas before dissipating.[36]
EF1 S of Cherrys Pickens, Oconee SC 34°35′N 82°52′W / 34.59°N 82.87°W / 34.59; -82.87 (Cherrys (August 26, EF1)) August 26 1836–1850 6.83 miles (10.99 km) 30 yd (27 m) Tornado touched down along the Pickens–Oconee County line and downed several trees and power lines along an intermittent path.[37] The tornado caused minor structural damage around the Memorial Stadium in Clemson University.[38]
EF0 NNE of Six Mile Pickens SC 34°50′N 82°49′W / 34.83°N 82.81°W / 34.83; -82.81 (Six Mile (August 26, EF0)) August 26 1920–1920 0.1 miles (160 m) 30 yd (27 m) Brief tornado downed power lines along Highway 137.[39]
EF2 WSW of Sandy Springs Anderson, Pickens SC 34°35′N 82°49′W / 34.58°N 82.81°W / 34.58; -82.81 (Sandy Springs (August 26, EF2)) August 26 1935–1947 5.48 miles (8.82 km) 30 yd (27 m) Tornado touched down along Highway 187 where it damaged a home and downed trees. Tracking northward, the storm intensified and snapped numerous large trees near the Anderson–Pickens County line. Damage in the area was rated EF2.[40] The tornado continued into the south side of Clemson University campus before dissipating.[41]
EF1 SW of Oakwood Hall GA 34°13′N 83°53′W / 34.21°N 83.89°W / 34.21; -83.89 (Oakwood (August 26, EF1)) August 26 1938–1949 4.82 miles (7.76 km) 200 yd (180 m) An intermittent tornado first touched down southwest of Oakwood and remained on the ground for 0.75 mi (1.21 km). Along this portion of the track, ten homes and the local elementary school sustained minor roof damage. Five minutes later, the tornado touched down again to the southwest of Gainesville and tracked for 2.25 mi (3.62 km). Fifteen homes in the El Rancho Estates and the Lyman Elementary School sustained minor damage. Losses from the tornado amounted to $750,000.[42]
EF1 SSW of Donaldson Air Force Base Greenville SC 34°38′N 82°23′W / 34.64°N 82.38°W / 34.64; -82.38 (Donaldson Air Force Base (August 26, EF1)) August 26 2005–2017 6.09 miles (9.80 km) 30 yd (27 m) A tornado destroyed a large garage, removed shingles from homes, and downed trees about 5 mi (8.0 km) east of Pelzer.[43]
EF1 SW of Gillsville Hall GA 34°20′N 83°43′W / 34.33°N 83.71°W / 34.33; -83.71 (Gillsville (August 26, EF1)) August 26 2020–2022 0.77 miles (1.24 km) 100 yd (91 m) A brief tornado touched down southwest of Gillsville and removed a roof from a home. Three other homes sustained minor to moderate damage and 20 trees were downed.[44]
EF1 NNE of Arcade Jackson GA 34°07′N 83°33′W / 34.12°N 83.55°W / 34.12; -83.55 (Arcade (August 26, EF1)) August 26 2030–2047 7.64 miles (12.30 km) 100 yd (91 m) An intermittent tornado first touched down north-northeast of Arcade where it downed a few tree limbs before lifting. The storm then touched down again in the city of Commerce and tracked for 1.25 mi (2.01 km) before lifting near the Jackson–Banks County line. Forty trees were downed by the tornado, many of which fell on mobile homes and caused significant damage. Three mobile homes were destroyed, resulting in three injuries, and fifteen others were damaged.[45]
EF0 NE of Shelton Fairfield SC 34°31′N 81°24′W / 34.52°N 81.40°W / 34.52; -81.40 (Shelton (August 26, EF0)) August 26 2242–2248 4.85 miles (7.81 km) 60 yd (55 m) Tornado caused minor tree damage.[46]
EF0 NNW of Mallorysville Wilkes GA 33°54′N 82°47′W / 33.90°N 82.78°W / 33.90; -82.78 (Mallorysville (August 26, EF0)) August 26 2255–2307 5.06 miles (8.14 km) 100 yd (91 m) Tornado moved an anchored mobile home 6 ft (1.8 m) off its foundation and caused minor shingle damage to another home along Highway 17. Numerous trees were downed along the entire path.[47]
EF0 W of Cornwell Chester SC 34°36′N 81°12′W / 34.60°N 81.20°W / 34.60; -81.20 (Cornwell (August 26, EF0)) August 26 2312–2312 0.1 miles (160 m) 20 yd (18 m) Brief tornado downed trees and power lines.[48]
EF0 S of Salem Randolph NC 35°49′N 79°48′W / 35.82°N 79.80°W / 35.82; -79.80 (Salem (August 27, EF0)) August 27 1630–1635 0.5 miles (0.80 km) 50 yd (46 m) Brief tornado damaged two outbuildings and downed many trees. Cement yard statues and a light carport were tossed across a road.[49]
EF0 ENE of Surf City Pender NC 34°26′N 77°32′W / 34.43°N 77.53°W / 34.43; -77.53 (Surf City (August 27, EF0)) August 27 1705–1706 0.02 miles (32 m) 10 yd (9.1 m) Waterspout briefly moved onshore and tossed pool furniture.[50]
EF0 ESE of Archer Johnston NC 35°43′N 78°20′W / 35.71°N 78.33°W / 35.71; -78.33 (Archer (August 27, EF0)) August 27 1744–1746 0.25 miles (0.40 km) 50 yd (46 m) Brief tornado snapped or uprooted many trees in a densely forested area.[51]
EF0 E of Scotts Crossroads Wilson NC 35°44′N 78°02′W / 35.73°N 78.03°W / 35.73; -78.03 (Scotts Crossroads (August 27, EF0)) August 27 1750–1755 4.47 miles (7.19 km) 50 yd (46 m) Local law enforcement reported a tornado "bouncing" along a path extending from Highway 42 to Interstate 95, remaining over tobacco and soy fields for its entire duration.[52]
EF0 S of Crutchfield Crossroads Chatham NC 35°47′N 79°25′W / 35.78°N 79.42°W / 35.78; -79.42 (Crutchfield Crossroads (August 27, EF0)) August 27 2008–2013 2.63 miles (4.23 km) 100 yd (91 m) Weak tornado caused significant damage to an outbuilding and minor damage to several other structures. Many large trees were downed along its path.[53]
EF0 NE of Fremont Wayne, Wilson NC 35°35′N 77°56′W / 35.58°N 77.93°W / 35.58; -77.93 (Fremont (August 27, EF0)) August 27 0457–0505 1.94 miles (3.12 km) 100 yd (91 m) Tornado touched down over a corn field before impacting several farms. A barn was destroyed and a nearby home sustained minor damage; debris from the structures was blown up to 100 yd (91 m) away. After crossing a soy field, the tornado caused a second barn to collapse before temporarily lifting. It briefly touched down a short time after and caused minor damage to a few mobile homes and outbuildings before dissipating.[54][55]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ All dates are based on the local time zone where the tornado touched down; however, all times are in Coordinated Universal Time for consistency.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Stacy R. Stewart and John L. Beven II (February 8, 2009). "Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Fay" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  2. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  3. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  4. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  6. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  7. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  8. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  9. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  10. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  11. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  12. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  13. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  14. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  15. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  16. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  17. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  18. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  19. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  20. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  21. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  22. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  23. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  24. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  25. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  26. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  27. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  28. ^ "Florida Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  29. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  30. ^ "Alabama Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  31. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  32. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  33. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  34. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  35. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  36. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  37. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  38. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  39. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  40. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  41. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  42. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  43. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  44. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  45. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  46. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  47. ^ "Georgia Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  48. ^ "South Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  49. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  50. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  51. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  52. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  53. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  54. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  55. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: EF0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.