2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships

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Logo of the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships.

The 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships were held on 9–13 September 2009 at Parc Olímpic del Segre in La Seu d'Urgell, Spain under the auspices of International Canoe Federation. La Seu d'Urgell hosted the event previously in 1999. A demonstration event for women's single seat Canadian (C-1W) took place that was swept by Australia. Slovakia was the top medal winner with six, including three golds. Germany and Great Britain each won four medals with a gold medal each. Host nation Spain won their first medals ever at the championships with four (none gold).

Schedule[edit]

Opening ceremonies took place on 9 September at 8 PM CEST.[1] Heats took place on 10–11 September for individual events.[1][2][3] Team events took place on 12 September.[1][4] The finals for all individual events took place on 13 September 2009 from Noon to 2:30 PM CEST.[1][5] Medal and closing ceremonies took place on 13 September at 2:10 PM CEST.[1]

Technical officials[edit]

42 officials from 24 countries and the International Canoe Federation (ICF) were involved in the event judging.[1] The five-member jury is chaired by ICF official Richard Fox of Australia.[1]

Nations[edit]

A total of 60 nations were scheduled to participate at the championships.[1] The opening ceremonies on 9 September had over 300 athletes from 55 countries, including Nepal and Uganda making their debuts at the championships.[6]

Athletes[edit]

Prior to the start of the meeting, several slalom canoers had a discussion with the ICF on the future of slalom canoeing. Among those in the discussion were ICF President Perurena, Slalom Championships jury chair Fox, and slalom canoers Tony Estanguet (France), Michal Martikán (Slovakia), Pavol Hochschorner (Slovakia), Peter Hochschorner (Slovakia), Elena Kaliská (Slovakia), and David Florence (Great Britain).[7]

Event ticket prices[edit]

Ticket prices for the heat events on 10–11 September were 10 while it was €15 for the finals on 12–13 September.[1]

Accommodations[edit]

Accommodations took place in La Seu d'Urgell and surrounding areas. Besides hotels, other accommodations include rural rooms, rent a house, and rural apartments.[8]

Event innovations[edit]

At these championships, there was an automatic timing system that was both on the slalom canoer's bib and on the course itself.[1][9] There were a total of ten antennas on the course that once an electronic marker in a canoer's bib approaches an antenna, it triggered video camera and timing controls.[1][9] These course antennas were located at the start line, the finish line, and eight points in between.[1][9] This system was used as video feed for the championships.[1] It was an automatic system that times in the 1/100ths of a second and is uploadable on any Windows or Mac computer.[1]

Media coverage[edit]

Besides using the traditional coverage of television, the championships were also covered by Twitter[10] and Blogspot.[11] Live streaming was done on both the ICF website and the event website.[12][13] Live internet results were shown from the official championships website.[14] Another Internet site covering the championships with the ICF was KayakSession.com.[15] Televised coverage was also provided by UniversalSports.com and premiered on the Universal Sports broadcast channel in early October.[16]

Medal Summary[edit]

Men's[edit]

Canoe[edit]

Slovakia won the most medals with five. The Hochschorner twins wach won two golds, so they were the big medal winners in this discipline at these championships. France and Germany each won two medals with Tony Estanguet being the only non-Slovakian to win gold in this discipline.

Event Gold Points Silver Points Bronze Points
C-1[17]  Tony Estanguet (FRA) 96.21  Michal Martikán (SVK) 98.76  Jan Benzien (GER) 99.60
C-1 team[18]  Slovakia
Alexander Slafkovský
Michal Martikán
Matej Beňuš
100.84  France
Nicolas Peschier
Denis Gargaud Chanut
Tony Estanguet
103.77  Spain
Jordi Domenjó
Jon Ergüín
Ander Elosegi
106.68
C-2[19]  Slovakia
Pavol Hochschorner
Peter Hochschorner
105.70  Slovakia
Ladislav Škantár
Peter Škantár
105.84  Slovenia
Luka Božič
Sašo Taljat
107.37
C-2 team[20]  Slovakia
Pavol Hochschorner & Peter Hochschorner
Ladislav Škantár & Peter Škantár
Tomáš Kučera & Ján Bátik
113.51  Germany
David Schröder & Frank Henze
Marcus Becker & Stefan Henze
Robert Behling & Thomas Becker
116.97  Great Britain
Tim Baillie & Etienne Stott
David Florence & Richard Hounslow
Daniel Goddard & Colin Radmore
117.20

Kayak[edit]

Spain won the most medals in this discipline though they were both bronzes. The Czech Republic and Slovenia each won gold while France and Great Britain each won silver. Carles Juanmartí had the most medals in this discipline with two.

Event Gold Points Silver Points Bronze Points
K-1[21]  Peter Kauzer (SLO) 92.84  Boris Neveu (FRA) 94.89  Carles Juanmartí (ESP) 95.89
K-1 team[22]  Czech Republic
Ivan Pišvejc
Vavřinec Hradilek
Michal Buchtel
98.17  Great Britain
Campbell Walsh
Huw Swetnam
Richard Hounslow
99.46  Spain
Joan Crespo
Guillermo Díez-Canedo
Carles Juanmartí
100.62

Women's[edit]

Kayak[edit]

Germany and Great Britain each won two medals at this discipline with Jasmin Schornberg of Germany and Elizabeth Neave of Great Britain each winning a gold and a bronze being the top individual medal winners.

Event Gold Points Silver Points Bronze Points
K-1[23]  Jasmin Schornberg (GER) 106.75  Maialen Chourraut (ESP) 107.96  Elizabeth Neave (GBR) 109.04
K-1 team[24]  Great Britain
Elizabeth Neave
Louise Donington
Laura Blakeman
112.79  Slovakia
Jana Dukátová
Elena Kaliská
Gabriela Stacherová
118.14  Germany
Jasmin Schornberg
Claudia Bär
Jacqueline Horn
119.84

Exhibition[edit]

Women's canoe[edit]

20 women from 12 nations competed in this exhibition event. This event became an official event at next year's world championships in Tacen, Slovenia.[25] Australia swept the event.

Event First Points Second Points Third Points
C-1[26]  Leanne Guinea (AUS) 137.80  Rosalyn Lawrence (AUS) 143.10  Jessica Fox (AUS) 145.41

Medals Table[edit]

This does not count the C-1 women's event.

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Slovakia 3 3 0 6
2  France 1 2 0 3
3  Great Britain 1 1 2 4
3  Germany 1 1 2 4
5  Slovenia 1 0 1 2
6  Czech Republic 1 0 0 1
7  Spain 0 1 3 4
Total 8 8 8 24

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships August 2009 newsletter. - accessed 9 September 2009.
  2. ^ 10 September 2009 startlist released by event organizers. - accessed 10 September 2009.
  3. ^ 11 September 2009 startlist released by event organizers. - accessed 10 September 2009.
  4. ^ 12 September 2009 startlist released by event organizers. - accessed 10 September 2009.
  5. ^ Provisional program of the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 6 August 2009.
  6. ^ 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships: Ones to watch. - 10 September 2009 article accessed on 10 September 2009.
  7. ^ Roundtable in La Seu sets stage for further athlete involvement in slalom development. - 10 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  8. ^ List of accommodations for the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 9 September 2009.
  9. ^ a b c Innovations used for the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 9 September 2009.
  10. ^ Planet Canoe Twitter.com for the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 10 September 2009.
  11. ^ Blogspot.com information on the ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships - 10 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  12. ^ Live Tech Stream from the ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships 2009. - 10 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  13. ^ 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships official website live streaming. - 10 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  14. ^ Live timing of the Men's C-2 heats on 10 September 2009 from SiwiData. - 10 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  15. ^ Kayak Session webpage featuring the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.
  16. ^ 13 September 2009 UniversalSports.com video coverage Day 2 of the finals of the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 17 September 2009.
  17. ^ 13 September 2009 final results of the men's C-1 event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.
  18. ^ 12 September 2009 final results of the men's C-1 team slalom event for the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 12 September 2009.
  19. ^ 13 September 2009 final results of the men's C-2 event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.
  20. ^ 12 September 2009 final results for the men's C-2 team slalom event for the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 12 September 2009.
  21. ^ 13 September 2009 final results of the men's K-1 event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.
  22. ^ 12 September 2009 final results for the men's K-1 team event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 12 September 2009.
  23. ^ 13 September 2009 final results of the women's K-1 event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.
  24. ^ 12 September 2009 results of the women's K-1 team finals at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 12 September 2009.
  25. ^ ICF Development Programme reaches out to women with the ICF Women's C1 Development Camp. - 7 September 2009 article accessed 10 September 2009.
  26. ^ 13 September 2009 final results for the women's C-1 event at the 2009 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. - accessed 13 September 2009.

External links[edit]