2009 Open Championship

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2009 Open Championship
Tournament information
Dates 16–19 July 2009
Location Ayrshire, Scotland
Course(s) Ailsa Course, Turnberry
Organized by The R&A
Tour(s) European Tour
PGA Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 70[1]
Length 7,204 yards (6,587 m)[1]
Field 156 players, 73 after cut[1]
Cut 144 (+4)[1]
Prize fund £4,200,000
4,852,724
$6,837,628
Winner's share £750,000
€866,558
$1,221,005
Champion
United States Stewart Cink
278 (−2), playoff
 Turnberry is located in Scotland
 Turnberry
 Turnberry
Location in Scotland
Turnberry is located in South Ayrshire
Turnberry
Turnberry
Location in South Ayrshire, Scotland

The 2009 Open Championship was a men's major golf championship and the 138th Open Championship, held from 16–19 July at the Ailsa Course of the Turnberry Resort, in Ayrshire, Scotland. Stewart Cink won his only major championship to date (2017) after a four-hole playoff with Tom Watson. At age 59, Watson had the chance to win his sixth Open and become the oldest major champion in history during regulation play, but was unable to par the final hole and tied with Cink.[2]

It was the fourth Open at Turnberry; the previous winners were Watson (1977), Greg Norman (1986), and Nick Price (1994).[3]

Venue[edit]

As with previous editions of The Open Championship at Turnberry, this event was played on the resort's Ailsa Course. Since it last hosted the Championship in 1994, the course had been lengthened by almost 250 yards (230 m), with over 60 yards (55 m) having been added to the par 5 17th hole. Six new tees had been built, and the 16th hole was 45 yards (41 m) longer and had been remodelled into a dog-leg to the right, having previously been relatively straight.[4]

Card of the course[edit]

Ailsa Course

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Ailsa Craig 354 4 10 Dinna Fouter 456 4
2 Mak Siccar 428 4 11 Maidens 175 3
3 Blaw Wearie 489 4 12 Monument 451 4
4 Woe-Be-Tide 166 3 13 Tickly Tap 410 4
5 Fin Me Oot 474 4 14 Risk-An-Hope 448 4
6 Tappie Toorie 231 3 15 Ca' Canny 206 3
7 Roon The Ben 538 5 16 Wee Burn 455 4
8 Goat Fell 454 4 17 Lang Whang 559 5
9 Bruce's Castle 449 4 18 Duel in the Sun 461 4
Out 3,583 35 In 3,621 35
Total 7,204 70

Previous lengths of the course for The Open Championship:[1]

  • 1994: 6,957 yards (6,361 m), par 70
  • 1986: 6,957 yards (6,361 m), par 70
  • 1977: 6,875 yards (6,286 m), par 70

Field[edit]

Each year, around two thirds of The Open Championship field consists of players that are fully exempt from qualifying for the Open. Below is a list of the exemption categories, and the players who were exempt for the 2009 Open. Each player is classified according to the first category by which they qualified, with other categories they also fall into being shown in parentheses. Some categories are not shown as all players in that category had already qualified from an earlier category:

1. First 10 and anyone tying for 10th place in the 2008 Open Championship
Robert Allenby (5,15), Stephen Ames (5), Paul Casey (5,6,7,19), Ben Curtis (3,4,5,15,19), Ernie Els (3,4,5,15), Jim Furyk (5,15,19), Pádraig Harrington (3,4,5,6,13,19), David Howell, Anthony Kim (5,15,19), Greg Norman (3), Ian Poulter (5,6,19), Henrik Stenson (5,6,14,19), Steve Stricker (5,15,19), Chris Wood

2. Past Open Champions born between 17 July 1943 and 19 July 1948
(Eligible but did not compete: Tony Jacklin, Johnny Miller)

3. Past Open Champions aged 60 or under on 19 July 2008
Mark Calcavecchia, John Daly, David Duval (4), Nick Faldo, Todd Hamilton (4), Paul Lawrie (4), Tom Lehman, Justin Leonard (5,15,19), Sandy Lyle, Mark O'Meara, Tom Watson, Tiger Woods (4,5,11,12,13)
(Eligible but did not compete: Ian Baker-Finch, Seve Ballesteros, Nick Price, Bill Rogers)

4. The Open Champions for 1999-2008

5. The first 50 players on the Official World Golf Rankings for Week 21, 2009
Ángel Cabrera (11,12), Chad Campbell (15,19), K. J. Choi (15), Stewart Cink (15,19), Tim Clark (15), Luke Donald, Gonzalo Fernández-Castaño, Ross Fisher (6), Sergio García (6,14,15,19), Retief Goosen (6), Miguel Ángel Jiménez (6,7,19), Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson (12), Martin Kaymer (6), Søren Kjeldsen (6), Hunter Mahan (15,19), Graeme McDowell (6,19), Rory McIlroy, Geoff Ogilvy (11), Sean O'Hair, Kenny Perry (15,19), Álvaro Quirós (6), Justin Rose (19), Rory Sabbatini, Adam Scott, Vijay Singh (13,15), David Toms, Camilo Villegas (15), Nick Watney, Mike Weir (15), Lee Westwood (6,19), Oliver Wilson (6,19)

6. First 30 in the PGA European Tour Final Order of Merit for 2008
Darren Clarke, Richard Finch, Richard Green, Søren Hansen (19), Peter Hanson, Peter Hedblom, James Kingston, Pablo Larrazábal, Paul McGinley, Damien McGrane, Francesco Molinari, Colin Montgomerie, Charl Schwartzel, Anthony Wall

7. The BMW PGA Championship winners for 2007-2009
Anders Hansen

8. First 3 and anyone tying for 3rd place, not exempt having applied above, in the top 20 of the 2009 PGA European Tour Race to Dubai on completion of the 2009 BMW PGA Championship
Thongchai Jaidee, Louis Oosthuizen, Robert Rock

9. First 2 European Tour members and any European Tour members tying for 2nd place, not exempt, in a cumulative money list taken from all official PGA European Tour events from OWGR Week 19 up to and including the BMW International Open and including the U.S. Open
Nick Dougherty, Johan Edfors

10. The leading player, not exempt having applied above, in the first 5 and ties of each of the 2009 Open de France ALSTOM and the 2009 Barclays Scottish Open.

11. The U.S. Open Champions for 2005-2009
Michael Campbell, Lucas Glover

12. The U.S. Masters Champions for 2005-2009

13. The U.S. PGA Champions for 2004-2008

14. The U.S. PGA Tour Players Champions for 2007-2009

15. Top 30 on the Official 2008 PGA Tour FedEx Cup points list
Stuart Appleby, Briny Baird, Ken Duke, Ryuji Imada, Billy Mayfair, Carl Pettersson, Andrés Romero, Kevin Sutherland, D. J. Trahan, Bubba Watson

16. First 3 and anyone tying for 3rd place, not exempt having applied above, in the top 20 of the FedEx Cup points list of the 2009 PGA Tour on completion of the HP Byron Nelson Championship
Brian Gay, Charley Hoffman, Charles Howell III

17. First 2 PGA Tour members and any PGA Tour members tying for 2nd place, not exempt, in a cumulative money list taken from The Players Championship and the five PGA Tour events leading up to and including the 2009 AT&T National
Paul Goydos, Bryce Molder

18. The leading player, not exempt having applied above, in the first 5 and ties of each of the 2009 AT&T National and the 2009 John Deere Classic
Brandt Snedeker

19. Playing members of the 2008 Ryder Cup teams
J. B. Holmes, Boo Weekley

20. First place on the 2008 Asian Tour Order of Merit

21. First place on the 2008 PGA Tour of Australasia Order of Merit
Mark Brown

22. First place on the 2008 Sunshine Tour Order of Merit
Richard Sterne

23. The 2008 Japan Open Champion

24. First 2, not exempt, on the Official Money List of the Japan Golf Tour for 2008
Prayad Marksaeng, Azuma Yano

25. The leading 4 players, not exempt, in the 2009 Mizuno Open Yomiuri Classic
Ryo Ishikawa, Tomohiro Kondo, Kenichi Kuboya, David Smail

26. First 2 and anyone tying for 2nd place, not exempt having applied (25) above, in a cumulative money list taken from all official 2009 Japan Golf Tour events up to and including the 2009 Mizuno Open Yomiuri Classic
Yuta Ikeda, Koumei Oda

27. The Senior British Open Champion for 2008
Bruce Vaughan

28. The 2009 Amateur Champion
Matteo Manassero (a)

29. The 2008 U.S. Amateur Champion
(U.S. Amateur winner Danny Lee turned professional in April 2009 and forfeited his automatic exemption.[13])

30. The 2008 European Individual Amateur Champion
Stephan Gross (a)

International Final Qualifying

Africa: Jaco Ahlers, Marc Cayeux, Jeremy Kavanagh
Australasia: Josh Geary, Tim Wood, Michael Wright
Asia: Gaganjeet Bhullar, Liang Wen-chong, Terry Pilkadaris, Tim Stewart
America: James Driscoll, Fredrik Jacobson, Richard S. Johnson, Matt Kuchar, Martin Laird, Davis Love III, Jeff Overton
Europe: Paul Broadhurst, Rhys Davies, David Drysdale, Rafael Echenique, Oliver Fisher, Branden Grace, Raphaël Jacquelin, Gary Orr, Richie Ramsay, Graeme Storm

Local Final Qualifying

Glasgow Golf Club - Gailes Links: Thomas Aiken, Peter Baker, David Higgins, Elliot Saltman
Kilmarnock (Barassie): Markus Brier, Peter Ellebye, Daniel Gaunt, Lloyd Saltman
Western Gailes: Fredrik Andersson Hed, Thomas Haylock, Steve Surry, Daniel Wardrop

Alternates
Drawn from the Official World Golf Rankings of 5 July 2009[14] (provide the player was entered in the Open and did not withdraw from qualifying):[9][15]

  1. Mathew Goggin replaced Trevor Immelman.[8]
  2. Ben Crane replaced Phil Mickelson.[9]
  3. Steve Marino replaced Shingo Katayama.[10]
  4. Rod Pampling entered the field as no players not already qualified finished in the top 5 at the Barclays Scottish Open.[16]
  5. Thomas Levet replaced Brett Quigley.[12][15]
  6. John Senden replaced Jeev Milkha Singh.[11]

Nationalities in the field[edit]

North America (46) South America (4) Europe (63) Oceania (19) Asia (12) Africa (12)
 Canada (2)  Argentina (3)  England (22)  Australia (14)  China (1)  South Africa (11)
 United States (44)  Colombia (1)  Northern Ireland (3)  Fiji (1)  India (1)  Zimbabwe (1)
 Scotland (9)  New Zealand (4)  Japan (7)
 Wales (1)  South Korea (1)
 Ireland (4)  Thailand (2)
 Austria (1)
 Denmark (4)
 France (2)
 Germany (2)
 Italy (2)
 Spain (5)
 Sweden (8)

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Tom Watson  United States 1975, 1977,
1980, 1982, 1983
65 70 71 72 278 –2 2nd
Ernie Els  South Africa 2002 69 72 72 68 281 +1 T8
Justin Leonard  United States 1997 70 70 73 68 281 +1 T8
Mark Calcavecchia  United States 1989 67 69 77 71 284 +4 T27
John Daly  United States 1995 68 72 72 72 284 +4 T27
Paul Lawrie  Scotland 1999 71 73 76 68 288 +8 T47
Tom Lehman  United States 1996 68 74 74 74 290 +10 T60
Pádraig Harrington  Ireland 2007, 2008 69 74 76 73 292 +12 T65
Mark O'Meara  United States 1998 67 77 77 74 295 +15 T70

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Ben Curtis  United States 2003 65 80 145 +5
Todd Hamilton  United States 2004 75 70 145 +5
Tiger Woods  United States 2000, 2005, 2006 71 74 145 +5
David Duval  United States 2001 71 76 147 +7
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1985 75 73 148 +8
Nick Faldo  England 1987, 1990, 1992 78 73 151 +11
Greg Norman  Australia 1986, 1993 77 75 152 +12

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, 16 July 2009

Calm and sunny weather provided good scoring conditions for the opening round. Miguel Ángel Jiménez took the lead at 64 (−6), and past champions turned back the clock: five-time winner Tom Watson, age 59, carded a bogey-free 65, and both Mark Calcavecchia (1989, age 49) and Mark O'Meara (1998, 52) shot 67. Ben Curtis, 2003 champion, also opened with 65 to join Watson and Kenichi Kuboya, who was even par through 14 holes, but finished birdie, birdie, eagle, birdie. Steve Stricker, Stewart Cink, and Camilo Villegas started strong at 66, and notables at 67 included Calcavecchia, O'Meara, Retief Goosen, Jim Furyk, Mike Weir, and Vijay Singh. Two-time defending champion Pádraig Harrington had a quiet 69, while Tiger Woods struggled off the tee for 71. Two-time champion Greg Norman, the previous year's Cinderella story, had a disappointing 77.[17][18]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Miguel Ángel Jiménez  Spain 64 −6
T2 Ben Curtis  United States 65 −5
Kenichi Kuboya  Japan
Tom Watson  United States
T5 Stewart Cink  United States 66 −4
Mathew Goggin  Australia
John Senden  Australia
Steve Stricker  United States
Camilo Villegas  Colombia
T10 Mark Calcavecchia  United States 67 −3
Jim Furyk  United States
Retief Goosen  South Africa
Branden Grace  South Africa
James Kingston  South Africa
Steve Marino  United States
Mark O'Meara  United States
Vijay Singh  Fiji
Richard Sterne  South Africa
Boo Weekley  United States
Mike Weir  Canada

Second round[edit]

Friday, 17 July 2009

High winds and scattered showers pushed the scoring average more than two strokes higher with just seven sub-par rounds on Friday, compared to fifty on Thursday. The conditions were the worst during the morning, and the round's best of 68 belonging to co-leader Steve Marino and Ross Fisher, tied for fourth place. Retief Goosen shot an even par 70 to share fourth. Veteran Tom Watson continued his excellent performance; he struggled through the front nine, but holed long putts at the 16th and 18th, as he made three birdies on the back nine to tie Marino for the lead at 135 (−5). Nearly sixty, Watson looked to become the oldest winner of a major championship by over a decade.[19]

The cut was at 144 (+4) and 73 players advanced to the weekend. Sixteen-year-old British Amateur Champion Matteo Manassero played with Watson and posted 141 and all but secured the silver medal as the leading amateur.[20] Among those to miss the cut was world number one and pre-tournament favorite Tiger Woods. Going out in the afternoon, his 74 included two double bogeys on holes 10 and 13, and his 145 missed the cut by a stroke. It was his first missed cut at the Open, and only the second missed cut in a major as a professional, after the 2006 U.S. Open.[19] Other notables to miss the cut included Mike Weir (67–78=145), Ben Curtis (65–80=145), David Duval (71–76=147), and Geoff Ogilvy (75–78=153).[21]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Steve Marino  United States 67-68=135 −5
Tom Watson  United States 65-70=135
3 Mark Calcavecchia  United States 67-69=136 −4
T4 Ross Fisher  England 69-68=137 −3
Retief Goosen  South Africa 67-70=137
Miguel Ángel Jiménez  Spain 64-73=137
Kenichi Kuboya  Japan 65-72=137
Vijay Singh  Fiji 67-70=137
T9 Stewart Cink  United States 66-72=138 −2
J. B. Holmes  United States 68-70=138
Mathew Goggin  Australia 66-72=138
James Kingston  South Africa 67-71=138
Lee Westwood  England 68-70=138

Amateurs: Manassero (+1), Gross (+9).

Third round[edit]

Saturday, 18 July 2009

Tom Watson continued his good form with a one-over 71 to maintain a one stroke lead. Mathew Goggin was one of only five players under par in conditions similar to Friday, and was just one stroke off the lead, tied for second with Ross Fisher. The best round of the day was 67 by Bryce Molder, who leapt into the top ten after starting the round in a tie for 53rd.[22][23]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Tom Watson  United States 65-70-71=206 −4
T2 Ross Fisher  England 69-68-70=207 −3
Mathew Goggin  Australia 66-72-69=207
T4 Retief Goosen  South Africa 67-70-71=208 −2
Lee Westwood  England 68-70-70=208
T6 Stewart Cink  United States 66-72-71=209 −1
Jim Furyk  United States 67-72-70=209
T8 Bryce Molder  United States 70-73-67=210 E
Thongchai Jaidee  Thailand 69-72-69=210
T10 Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 69-70-72=211 +1
Richard S. Johnson  Sweden 70-72-69=211
Steve Marino  United States 67-68-76=211
Boo Weekley  United States 67-72-72=211

Final round[edit]

Sunday, 19 July 2009

Fisher birdied the first two holes to take the outright lead as Watson had two bogeys in three holes. Fisher dropped back with a quadruple bogey 8 on the 5th hole and was never in contention again. Lee Westwood eagled the 7th hole to move into the lead, which he held or shared for most of the round, but bogeys at three of the last four holes put him one stroke behind clubhouse leader Cink, who rolled in a 15-foot (4.5 m) putt for birdie at the 18th to move to two-under, one clear of the previous year's leading amateur Chris Wood.

Watson birdied the 17th to move into the clear lead at 3 under par. Needing a par four at the 18th to win, his approach shot took an unfortunate bounce at the green's front and rolled off the back. Watson was unable to get up and down and entered into a four-hole playoff with Cink for the Claret Jug.[2][24]

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
T1 Stewart Cink  United States 66-72-71-69=278 −2 Playoff
Tom Watson  United States 65-70-71-72=278
T3 Lee Westwood  England 68-70-70-71=279 −1 255,000
Chris Wood  England 70-70-72-67=279
T5 Luke Donald  England 71-72-70-67=280 E 157,000
Mathew Goggin  Australia 66-72-69-73=280
Retief Goosen  South Africa 67-70-71-72=280
T8 Thomas Aiken  South Africa 71-72-69-69=281 +1 90,400
Ernie Els  South Africa 69-72-72-68=281
Søren Hansen  Denmark 68-72-74-67=281
Richard S. Johnson  Sweden 70-72-69-70=281
Justin Leonard  United States 70-70-73-68=281

Amateurs: Manassero (+2)

Scorecard[edit]

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 4 4 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 5 4
United States Cink –1 –1 –1 –1 E E –1 –1 –1 E –1 –1 –2 –1 –2 –1 –1 –2
United States Watson –3 –3 –2 –2 –2 –2 –3 –3 –2 –2 –3 –3 –3 –2 –2 –2 –3 –2
England Westwood –2 –2 –2 –2 –1 –2 –4 –4 –4 –3 –3 –3 –3 –3 –2 –1 –2 –1
England Wood +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 E –1 –1 –2 –2 –2 –1 E –1 –1 –2 –1

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

Eagle Birdie Bogey Double bogey

Source:[25]

Playoff[edit]

Watson and Cink had tied at 278 (–2) during regulation play and entered a playoff for the championship. Under the rules of the Open Championship, a four-hole aggregate playoff was played over hole numbers 5, 6, 17, and 18.

On the first extra hole, both players found greenside bunkers, but while Watson was only able to make minimal progress towards the hole and made bogey, Cink splashed out to six feet (1.8 m) and saved par. Both made par three on the second hole, but at the par 5 17th, Watson's drive went left to a bad lie in heavy rough, and he was unable to reach the fairway with his next shot. On the green in four, he three-putted for double bogey, while Cink hit the green in two and two-putted for birdie. With a four-stroke lead on the final hole, Cink hit his approach to five feet (1.5 m) and made birdie to triumph in the playoff by six strokes.[2][24]

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
1 Stewart Cink  United States 4-3-4-3=14 −2 750,000
2 Tom Watson  United States 5-3-7-5=20 +4 450,000
  • Four-hole aggregate playoff on holes 5, 6, 17, and 18

Scorecard[edit]

Playoff

Hole   5     6    17   18 
Par 4 3 5 4
United States Cink E E –1 –2
United States Watson +1 +1 +3 +4

Cumulative playoff scores, relative to par
Source:[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Media guide". The Open Championship. 2011. pp. 20, 203. Archived from the original on 18 April 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Cink dashes Watson's Open dreams". BBC Sport. 18 July 2009. Retrieved 18 July 2009. 
  3. ^ "Turnberry hosts The Open in 2009". BBC Sport. 1 December 2005. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  4. ^ "Turnberry to set longer Open test". BBC Sport. 21 April 2009. Archived from the original on 22 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  5. ^ "Karlsson withdraws from British Open". Reuters. ESPN. 7 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  6. ^ a b "Eye problem forces Karlsson out of Open". Agence France-Presse. MSNBC. 7 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  7. ^ "Immelman withdraws from British Open". Associated Press. USA Today. 8 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  8. ^ a b "Injury forces Trevor Immelman to pull out of Turnberry Open". The Guardian. 8 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  9. ^ a b c "Mickelson choosing to stay with wife". Associated Press. ESPN. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  10. ^ a b "Katayama out with injury; Marino takes spot in field". PGA Tour. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  11. ^ a b "Jeev Milkha Singh pulls out of the Open". The Guardian. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  12. ^ a b "Stricker earns second PGA win of year". Associated Press. ESPN. 12 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  13. ^ "World Number 1 Danny Lee Turns Pro". The New Zealand Herald. amateurgolf.com. 14 April 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  14. ^ "Official World Golf Rankings, Week 27, 5 July 2009" (PDF). Official World Golf Rankings. 5 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  15. ^ a b "Open joy for Thomas Levet". Agence France-Presse. The Times (South Africa). 20 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  16. ^ "Pampling pinches last-minute Open slot". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 July 2009. Archived from the original on 2 August 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2009. 
  17. ^ "Superb Jimenez holds lead at Open". BBC Sport. 16 July 2009. Archived from the original on 17 July 2009. Retrieved 16 July 2009. 
  18. ^ "The Open - day one as it happened". BBC Sport. 16 July 2009. Archived from the original on 16 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  19. ^ a b "Woods misses cut as Watson shines". BBC Sport. 17 July 2009. Retrieved 18 July 2009. 
  20. ^ "Italian teenager enjoys dream day". BBC Sport. 17 July 2009. Retrieved 18 July 2009. 
  21. ^ "Open day two as it happened". BBC Sport. 16 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  22. ^ "Watson leads going into final day". BBC Sport. 18 July 2009. Retrieved 18 July 2009. 
  23. ^ "Open day three as it happened". BBC Sport. 16 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  24. ^ a b "Open day four as it happened". BBC Sport. 16 July 2009. Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  25. ^ a b "2009 Open Championship leaderboard". Yahoo! Sports. 19 July 2009. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2009 U.S. Open
Major Championships Succeeded by
2009 PGA Championship

Coordinates: 55°18′58″N 4°49′55″W / 55.316°N 4.832°W / 55.316; -4.832