2010 Honda Indy Edmonton

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2010 Honda Indy Edmonton
Race details
11th round of the 2010 IndyCar Series season
Edmonton Grand Prix racing track.svg
Date July 25, 2010
Official name Honda Indy Edmonton
Location Edmonton City Centre Airport, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Course Temporary street circuit
1.973 mi / 3.154 km
Distance 95 laps
187.435 mi / 299.630 km
Pole position
Driver Will Power (Team Penske)
Time 1:00.7126
Fastest lap
Driver Scott Dixon (Chip Ganassi Racing)
Time 1:02.1277 (on lap 88 of 95)
Podium
First Scott Dixon (Chip Ganassi Racing)
Second Will Power (Team Penske)
Third Dario Franchitti (Chip Ganassi Racing)

The 2010 Honda Indy Edmonton was an IndyCar motor race held on July 25, 2010 at the Edmondon City Centre Airport, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It was the eleventh round of the 2010 IndyCar Series season, the third annual edition of the Edmonton Indy in the IndyCar Series, and the sixth anniversary running of the race (including its three years on the Champ Car World Series (CCWS) schedule). The 95-lap race was won by Chip Ganassi Racing driver Scott Dixon, who started from third position. Will Power finished second for Team Penske and Dixon's teammate Dario Franchitti came in third.

Power, the defending champion of the Honda Indy Edmonton, won the pole position by posting the fastest lap in qualifying. In the race, Power maintained the first position throughout most of the event, but was passed by teammate Hélio Castroneves with eighteen laps remaining. On the race's final restart on lap 92, Power attempted to reclaim the lead from Castroneves but the latter defended his position and was issued with a drive-through penalty. He chose not to take it and was demoted to tenth and the victory was awarded to Dixon.

There were four cautions and four lead changes among three different drivers during the race. It was Dixon's second win of the season, and the twenty-third of his career. The result meant Power extended his lead in the Drivers' Championship to 50 points over Franchitti, and 71 in front of Dixon, with six races of the season remaining.

Report[edit]

Background[edit]

The Honda Indy Edmonton was confirmed as a part of the Indy Racing League's (IRL) 2010 schedule for the IndyCar Series in December 2009 after Edmonton City Council voted to keep the race on the calendar despite it occurring losses of $9.2 million for the previous two seasons.[1] It was to be the third consecutive year the race was held in the series, and the sixth Edmonton Indy counting the period from 2005 to 2007 when it was a CCWS event.[2] It was the second consecutive round held in Canada, following the Honda Indy Tornoto the previous week.[3] Tire supplier Firestone brought three types to tire to the race: two dry compounds (black-sidewall "Primary" and red-banded "Alternate") and grooved rain tires.[4]

Prior to the race, Team Penske driver Will Power was the points leader with 377 points, with his primary championship rival Dario Franchitti 42 behind in second and Scott Dixon third. Ryan Briscoe was fourth on 292 points, and Ryan Hunter-Reay was sixth points adrift in fifth position.[5] Having dominated the previous running of the Indy Edmonton, Power felt he could repeat the success and believed it would be "very competitive" in the qualifying session and "very tough" in the race.[6] With seven races remaining in the season (two on road courses and four on oval tracks), Franchitti said he wanted to get back into the championship battle after he retired with an gearbox problem in the Iowa Corn Indy 250 and hoped he would perform well in Edmonton.[7]

Practice and qualifying[edit]

Will Power had the sixth pole position of the 2010 season.

Two practice sessions were held on the Friday before the race: each lasted for an hour. A third session, also an hour long, took place on the Saturday morning prior to qualifying.[8] Franchitti was fastest in the first practice session with a time of 1:03.0885; Dixon was second and Power third. Hélio Castroneves was fourth-fastest, ahead of Justin Wilson and Paul Tracy. Ryan Briscoe, Ryan Hunter-Reay, E. J. Viso and Takuma Sato rounded out the session's top-ten drivers.[9] The session was twice stopped: firstly for Milka Duno who lost control of her car and went into the turn ten tire barrier causing damage to her front wing, and Bertrand Baguette spun after he hit a chicane kerb which caused to him to drive through an advertising hoarding.[9][10] In the second practice session, Power set the fastest time of the day with a lap of 1:01.6689, with his teammates Briscoe in second and Castroneves third. Franchitti recorded the fourth-quickest time; Sato was fifth and Dixon sixth. Wilson, Viso, Tracy and Tony Kanaan followed in the top ten.[11] Three caution flags came out; Baugette crashed, Duno stalled after she spun and Tomas Scheckter slid into a tire barrier.[12]

In the final practice session, Castroneves recorded the fastest time with a lap of 1:01.6642, ahead of his Team Penske teammates Power and Briscoe. Hideki Mutoh recorded the fourth-fastest time; Dixon was fifth and Tracy sixth. Wilson was seventh-fastest, Kannan eighth, Marco Andretti ninth and Sato completed the top ten ahead of qualifying. Several drivers had high-speed spins during the session without damaging their cars which triggered the caution flags to be displayed. A stoppage was caused when Tracy and Alex Tagilani both spun in the first turn; the former narrowly avoided a collision with Baugette who was exiting the pit lane.[13]

Qualifying followed the usual road and street course system, with the field being split into two groups.[14] All cars were split into two groups of twelve, with the fastest six from each group going through to the "Top 12" session. In this session, the fastest six runners progressed to the "Firestone Fast Six". The fastest driver in the final session claimed pole, with the rest of the runners lining up in session order, regardless of qualifying times. (Fast Six from one to six, Top 12 from seven-twelve and Round 1 from 13–24, with Group 1 drivers occupying the odd-numbered grid positions, and Group 2 drivers occupying the even-numbered grid positions).[11] Duno was prohibited from participating in qualifying because her practice lap times did not meet the required performance standards but was allowed to start the race.[15] In the first group of twelve runners, Power paced the session, nearly three tenths of a second faster than teammate Briscoe with Castroneves in third place. Other drivers to make it into the second session of qualifying were Franchitti, Wilson and Raphael Matos.[16] The remaining twelve drivers took part in the second group, with Simona de Silvestro recording her fastest lap of the day. Hunter-Reay, Dixon, Viso, Mutoh and Scheckter were the other competitors in the top six, and thus progressed to the second round of qualifying.[17] In the Top 12, Power set the fastest lap time, holding off teammate Castroneves and Dixon. Briscoe, Franchitti and Viso finished between fourth and sixth, and would be the other half of the drivers that progressed to the Fast Six.[18] Power clinched his sixth pole position of the season with a time of 1:00.7126. He was joined on the grid's front row by teammate Castroneves and had the pole until Power's lap. Chip Ganassi Racing teammates Dixon and Franchitti were third and fourth, and Briscoe took fifth ahead of Viso.[19]

Race[edit]

The drivers took to the track at 10:00 (UTC−6) for a 30-minute warm-up session.[8] Power maintained his good performance, setting a time of 1:01.8397. Dixon was the second-fastest driver. Power's Team Penske teammates Castroneves and Briscoe rounded out the top four.[20]

The race, the eleventh out of seventeen, began at 4:00 p.m. local time,[8] and was televised live in the United States on Versus. Weather conditions at the start of the race were sunny and mild with an air temperature between 76–78 °F (24–26 °C) and a track temperature which ranged between 102–111 °F (39–44 °C).[21][22] Power maintained his pole position advantage heading into the first turn. Duno spun off at the start but no caution was needed.[23] De Silvestro passed Viso for sixth place on the same lap.[19] At the end of the first lap, Power led Castroneves, with Dixon, Franchitti, Briscoe, de Silvestro, Viso, Hunter-Reay, Wilson and Matos rounding out the top ten.[24] The top five drivers began to pull away from the rest of the field. On lap two, Tracy made contact with Matos' rear-end in turn two who was sent spinning into the infield grass and Matos drove cautiously to the pit lane with a flat left-rear tire. Scheckter's front wing was damaged on lap 10 for which he made a pit stop for a replacement nose cone.[23] After starting fifteenth, Tracy drove aggressively and moved up into tenth position by the 20th lap.[19]

Scott Dixon (pictured in 2011) won the race after Hélio Castroneves was demoted for blocking Will Power.

Briscoe passed the Chip Ganassi Racing drivers after they were held up by slower cars to move into second place on lap 29. Green-flag pit stops began four laps later. Wilson spun at the end of the backstretch while braking for turn ten on the 36th lap after his right-rear shock absorber failed and drove slowly to his pit box to repair damage. Danica Patrick attempted to pass Baugette around the inside on lap 39, but lost control of her car and ran wide into the infield grass section and rejoined the track in 17th without damage to her suspension. Andretti's front wing came apart on lap 46 while holding up four cars, and Scheckter ran wide as the four cars passed Andretti. The first full course caution was race was necessitated on the following lap when Alex Lloyd spun into the grass and stalled his engine. Andretti made a pit stop for a replacement front wing during the caution. Racing resumed at the start of lap 51 with Power leading Castroneves, Briscoe and Dixon. Shortly afterward, de Silvestro was hit from behind by Viso who overheated his brakes, and went into the turn one tyre barrier, causing the second caution. Viso avoided making contact with teammate Tracy (who took avoiding action) on the same lap.[19][23]

Viso was issued with an drive-through penalty and rejoined in tenth position. The race resumed on lap 54 with Power retaining his lead. The race's third caution was issued shortly after the restart when Kanaan made light contact with the side of Tagilani who spun. Mario Romancini was blinded by smoke that came from the incident and was hit by Tagilani who was attempting to regain control of his car. Both cars sustained heavy damage and retired but Kanaan was able to continue without apparent damage. Power led the field back up to speed at the lap-58 restart. Briscoe fell behind the two Chip Ganassi Racing drivers, while Tracy moved in front of Hunter-Reay for sixth place. The second (and final) round of green-flag pit stops started on the 63rd lap; Tracy and Hunter-Reay made their pit stops over the next five laps in the hope a caution flag would be shown that would allow the pair to lead the race.[19][23] After the pit stops, Power remained in the first position,[23] and had the Alternate tires fitted on his car.[25] He was ahead of Castroneves and Dixon.[24]

On the 77th lap, Power and teammate Castroneves (on the Primary tires) encountered slower cars, and the latter took advantage of the situation which allowed him to overtake Power for the lead. Castroneves began to pull away from Power. Ten laps later, de Silvestro's car ran out of fuel and pulled over to the side of the track onto the infield grass to retire from the race which prompted the fourth (and final) caution. Racing resumed when the pace car drove into the pit lane at the start of lap 92. Power went onto the outside lane at the entrance of the first turn, and Castroneves drove left as a blocking manoeuvre. Castroneves accelerated out of the corner's exit which caused Power to run wide. Dixon took advantage of the situation and passed Power around the outside to take over second place.[19][25] The move was immediately reviewed by the IndyCar chief steward and competition president Brian Barnhart and Castroneves was shown a black-flag one minute later after Barnhardt judged that he blocked Power.[26] Castroneves was informed that he was issued with a drive-through penalty. He opted to remain on the track for the final two laps and crossed the start-finish line first on the road.[26]

Because Castroneves had not taken his penalty, the victory was awarded to Dixon,[26] with Power in second and Franchitti third. Briscoe was fourth, and Hunter-Reay held off Tracy to claim fifth. Moraes, Viso and Sato finished in positions seven to nine, while Castroneves was demoted to tenth.[24] There were four cautions and four lead changes among three different drivers during the race.[27] It was Dixon's second win of the season, and the twenty-third of his career.[28]

Post-race[edit]

Hélio Castroneves was demoted to tenth after he was judged to have blocked Will Power.

Castroneves was upset about the penalty and leapt from his car and yelled in anger at the flagman (looking for an explanation) and grabbed the Head of Security Charles Burns as he sought an answer. He argued that he did not change his line: "I actually gave him room outside. When you go side by side like that with your teammate and the guy [Barnhart] has just swept ... literally, literally just takes it away from you ... it's just absurd."[26] Castroneves was fined $60,000 by the IRL for unsportsmanlike conduct and was placed on probation for the rest of the season. It was later revealed by IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard that the series considered suspending Castroneves but chose not to because of his popularity with its fanbase.[29] Castroneves later apologized for his actions but still did not agree with the penalty.[30] Similarities were made between Castroneves' block and the Brazilian's manoeuvre against Wilson in the 2008 Detroit Indy Grand Prix.[26] Gordon Kirby of Motor Sport Magazine opined that Castroneves' move was fair and sportmanslike and noted that several fans saw it as "good, hard racing".[31]

Dixon said of his victory: "It's not a way you want to win for sure. When I win, I want to win being faster or putting a good pass on someone. But the way our season is going, I'll be taking anything at the moment."[32] Second-place finisher Power said it was still a good finish for him in terms of scoring points.[32] Tony Cotman, the circuit's design consultant, announced in February 2011 that the track would be improved and lengthened for that year. He stated that the layout of the track be moved to.the Eastern runway of the City Centre Airport in an attempt to create more excitement. The result of the alterations would be an additional 0.3 miles (0.48 km) of track, creating a 2.2 miles (3.5 km) circuit.[33] With his second-place finish, Power extended his points lead in the standings to 50 over Franchitti and 71 ahead of Dixon. Briscoe and Hunter-Reay retained fourth and fifth positions.[27]

Classification[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Pos No. Driver Team Group 1[16] Group 2[17] Top 12[18] Fast 6[34]
1 12 Australia Will Power Team Penske 1:00.9285 1:01.0731 1:00.7126
2 3 Brazil Hélio Castroneves Team Penske 1:01.5903 1:01.2138 1:00.7891
3 9 New Zealand Scott Dixon Chip Ganassi Racing 1:01.8583 1:01.2329 1:01.2395
4 10 United Kingdom Dario Franchitti Chip Ganassi Racing 1:01.7341 1:01.3530 1:01.2481
5 6 Australia Ryan Briscoe Team Penske 1:01.2556 1:01.2349 1:01.3799
6 8 Venezuela E. J. Viso KV Racing Technology 1:01.9084 1:01.4394 1:01.6122
7 78 Switzerland Simona de Silvestro HVM Racing 1:01.7385 1:01.5438
8 37 United States Ryan Hunter-Reay Andretti Autosport 1:01.8249 1:01.5596
9 22 United Kingdom Justin Wilson Dreyer & Reinbold Racing 1:01.7594 1:01.5887
10 2 Brazil Raphael Matos De Ferran Dragon Racing 1:01.8319 1:01.7015
11 06 Japan Hideki Mutoh Newman/Haas Racing 1:02.0307 1:02.1935
12 24 South Africa Tomas Scheckter Dreyer & Reinbold Racing 1:02.1022 1:02.9751
13 5 Japan Takuma Sato KV Racing Technology 1:01.9181
14 32 Brazil Mario Moraes KV Racing Technology 1:02.1324
15 15 Canada Paul Tracy KV Racing Technology 1:02.3264
16 26 United States Marco Andretti Andretti Autosport 1:02.1465
17 34 Brazil Mario Romancini Conquest Racing 1:02.4191
18 19 United Kingdom Alex Lloyd Dale Coyne Racing 1:02.2203
19 77 Canada Alex Tagliani FAZZT Race Team 1:02.5240
20 36 Belgium Bertrand Baguette Conquest Racing 1:02.5193
21 7 United States Danica Patrick Andretti Autosport 1:02.5795
22 4 United Kingdom Dan Wheldon Panther Racing 1:02.7397
23 14 Brazil Vitor Meira A. J. Foyt Enterprises 1:02.7511
24 11 Brazil Tony Kanaan Andretti Autosport no time
25 18 Venezuela Milka Duno Dale Coyne Racing no time

Race[edit]

Pos No. Driver Team Laps Time/Retired Points
1 9 New Zealand Scott Dixon Chip Ganassi Racing 95 1:50:37.0551 50
2 12 Australia Will Power Team Penske 95 1:50:38.7239 43
3 10 United Kingdom Dario Franchitti Target Chip Ganassi Racing 95 1:50:40.3382 35
4 6 Australia Ryan Briscoe Team Penske 95 1:50:45.9203 32
5 37 United States Ryan Hunter-Reay Andretti Autosport 95 1:50:48.2033 30
6 15 Canada Paul Tracy KV Racing Technology 95 1:50:48.9642 28
7 32 Brazil Mario Moraes KV Racing Technology 95 1:50:53.9566 26
8 8 Venezuela E. J. Viso KV Racing Technology 95 1:50:55.2757 24
9 5 Japan Takuma Sato KV Racing Technology 95 1:50:58.6431 22
10 3 Brazil Hélio Castroneves Team Penske 95 1:51:39.6562 20
11 26 United States Marco Andretti Andretti Autosport 94 +1 lap 19
12 11 Brazil Tony Kanaan Andretti Autosport 94 +1 lap 18
13 2 Brazil Raphael Matos De Ferran Dragon Racing 94 +1 lap 17
14 36 Belgium Bertrand Baguette Conquest Racing 84 +1 lap 16
15 7 United States Danica Patrick Andretti Autosport 94 +1 lap 15
16 14 Brazil Vitor Meira A. J. Foyt Enterprises 93 +2 laps 14
17 06 Japan Hideki Mutoh Newman/Haas Racing 93 +2 laps 13
18 19 United Kingdom Alex Lloyd Dale Coyne Racing 92 +3 laps 12
19 24 South Africa Tomas Scheckter Dreyer & Reinbold Racing 90 +5 laps 12
20 4 United Kingdom Dan Wheldon Panther Racing 90 +5 laps 12
21 22 United Kingdom Justin Wilson Dreyer & Reinbold Racing 88 +7 laps 12
22 78 Switzerland Simona de Silvestro HVM Racing 87 Out of Fuel 12
23 77 Canada Alex Tagliani FAZZT Race Team 52 Contact 12
24 34 Brazil Mario Romancini Conquest Racing 52 Contact 12
25 18 Venezuela Milka Duno Dale Coyne Racing 4 Handling 10
OFFICIAL RACE REPORT

Standings after the race[edit]

Drivers' Championship standings
Pos +/– Driver Points
1 1rightarrow blue.svg Australia Will Power 420
2 1rightarrow blue.svg United Kingdom Dario Franchitti 370 (−50)
3 1rightarrow blue.svg New Zealand Scott Dixon 349 (−71)
4 1rightarrow blue.svg Australia Ryan Briscoe 324 (−96)
5 1rightarrow blue.svg United States Ryan Hunter-Reay 316 (−104)
Source:[22][27]
  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for the drivers' standings.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "City to go ahead with 2010 Indy". CBC Edmonton. December 7, 2009. Archived from the original on May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Honda Indy Edmonton preview". Flag World. July 23, 2010. Archived from the original on September 15, 2015. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  3. ^ "IndyCar Series announces 2010 schedule". Las Vegas Review-Journal. July 31, 2009. Archived from the original on May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Edmonton: Firestone Racing preview". motorsport.com. July 22, 2010. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  5. ^ "2010 Honda Indy Toronto". Racing-Reference. USA Today Media Sports Group. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Team Penske Honda Indy Edmonton Preview". Team Penske. July 21, 2010. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  7. ^ Korobanik, John (July 24, 2010). "Franchitti targets another title". Edmonton Journal. Archived from the original on July 25, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c "Honda Indy Edmonton – Weekend Schedule" (PDF). IndyCar. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 2, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Beer, Matt (July 23, 2010). "Franchitti quickest in opening practice". Autosport. Haymarket Publications. Archived from the original on June 3, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  10. ^ Bennett, Dean (July 25, 2010). "IndyCar racer Milka Duno dangerous, not up to speed". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Lewandoski, Dave (July 23, 2010). "INDYCAR: Power Tops Edmonton Practice". Speed. Archived from the original on July 26, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Power leads Penske practice sweep". racer.com. July 23, 2010. Archived from the original on July 29, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  13. ^ Beer, Matt (July 24, 2010). "Penske blitzes final Edmonton session". Autosport. Haymarket Publications. Archived from the original on August 23, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  14. ^ Cutler, Andrew (February 4, 2008). "New Road Course Qualifying Format". f1network.net (Durham Associates Group). Archived from the original on May 16, 2008. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  15. ^ "IRL places Duno on probation for being too slow". National Post. July 24, 2010. Archived from the original on May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b "Honda Indy Edmonton: Qualifying Round 1 – Group 1" (PDF). IndyCar Series. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 13, 2011. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  17. ^ a b "Honda Indy Edmonton: Qualifying Round 1 – Group 2" (PDF). IndyCar Series. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 13, 2011. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b "Honda Indy Edmonton: Qualifying – Top 12" (PDF). IndyCar Series. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 13, 2011. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f Filipponio, Frank (July 26, 2010). "IndyCar: 2010 Honda Indy Edmonton offers a view to a thrill". Autoblog. Archived from the original on July 29, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Edmonton: Warmup times". motorsport.com. July 25, 2010. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Edmonton: Firestone Racing race report". motorsport.com. July 26, 2010. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  22. ^ a b "Honda Indy Edmonton Race Report". Honda. July 27, 2010. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c d e "Scott Dixon wins in Edmonton". crash.net. July 25, 2010. p. 1. Archived from the original on October 30, 2015. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  24. ^ a b c "Sao Paulo Indy 300: Race Lap Chart" (PDF). IndyCar Series. July 25, 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 6, 2011. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  25. ^ a b "Scott Dixon wins in Edmonton". crash.net. July 25, 2010. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  26. ^ a b c d e Oreovicz, John (July 27, 2010). "IndyCar Series gripped by controversy". ESPN. Archived from the original on May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  27. ^ a b c "2010 Honda Indy Edmonton". Racing-Reference. USA Today Media Sports Group. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Scott Dixon – Biography". ScottDixon.com. Archived from the original on March 13, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Castroneves fined $60,000 by IndyCar but avoids suspension". Birmingham News. August 2, 2010. Archived from the original on August 11, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Helio Castroneves apologizes for Edmonton tirade". USA Today. Associated Press. July 26, 2010. Archived from the original on July 3, 2015. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  31. ^ Kirby, Gordon (August 3, 2010). "Castroneves ruling bad for IndyCar". Motor Sport. Archived from the original on June 4, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016. 
  32. ^ a b Jones, Terry (July 26, 2010). "Unexpected ending to Edmonton Indy". Toronto Sun. Retrieved May 26, 2016. 
  33. ^ Panzariu, Ovidiu (February 10, 2011). "Edmonton Reveals New Indy Course". Auto Evolution. Archived from the original on October 16, 2015. Retrieved May 26, 2016. 
  34. ^ "Honda Indy Edmonton: Qualifying – Fast 6" (PDF). IndyCar Series. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 13, 2011. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 


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