2010 IAAF World Indoor Championships – Women's 60 metres

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Events at the
2010 IAAF World Indoor
Championships

Athletics pictogram.svg
Track events
60 m   men   women
400 m men women
800 m men women
1500 m men women
3000 m men women
60 m hurdles men women
4×400 m relay men women
Field events
High jump men women
Pole vault men women
Long jump men women
Triple jump men women
Shot put men women
Combined events
Pentathlon women
Heptathlon men

The women's 60 metres competition at the 2010 IAAF World Indoor Championships was held at the ASPIRE Dome on 12 and 14 March.

The race was expected to be a duel between LaVerne Jones-Ferrette and Carmelita Jeter who had run some of the fastest times for many seasons at 6.97 and 7.02 seconds, respectively. In the first round of competition Myriam Soumaré was the surprise winner of the first heat, Jones-Ferrette clocked the fastest of the day in her heat with 7.14 seconds, while Veronica Campbell-Brown and Jeter topped their qualifiers comfortably. Ruddy Zang Milama of Gabon was another surprise in the final heat as she beat the more experienced Sheri-Ann Brooks and Mikele Barber.[1]

On the second day of competition, Campbell-Brown placed herself in contention for a medal with a 7.07 second run in the first semi-final, although Jones-Ferrette's time in the second semi was faster still. Brooks ran a personal best to beat Jeter in the last semi-final of the day. Among the other qualifiers, Zang Milama surprised further with 7.13-second national record to become the first Gabonese athlete to reach an indoor final in any event. Barber and reigning European 60 m champion Yevgeniya Polyakova were among the casualties of the round.[2]

In the final, Campbell-Brown ran a personal best of 7.00 seconds – the fastest winning time for 11 year – to upset the pre-race favourites. Finishing just after in 7.03 seconds, Jones-Ferrette settled for silver – the first global athletics medal for the United States Virgin Islands. Jeter rounded out the top three with a run of 7.05 seconds, continuing her bronze medal run from the World Championships in Athletics. Zang Milama and Brooks shared fourth place having made significant career progressions over the distance. Chandra Sturrup's sixth-place finish was notable in that, at the age of 38 years, she was almost a decade older than the next oldest athlete to reach the final (Jeter).[3]

Jones-Ferrette was later disqualified due to a doping infraction and banned for six months.[4] The positions and medals were redistributed, with Jeter receiving the silver and Zang Milama taking the bronze medal.[5]

Medalists[edit]

Gold Silver Bronze
Veronica Campbell-Brown
 Jamaica
Carmelita Jeter
 United States
Ruddy Zang Milama
 Gabon

Records[edit]

Standing records prior to the 2010 IAAF World Indoor Championships
World record  Irina Privalova (RUS) 6.92 Madrid, Spain 11 February 1993
Championship record  Gail Devers (USA) 6.95 Toronto, Canada 12 March 1993
World Leading  LaVerne Jones-Ferrette (ISV) 6.97 Stuttgart, Germany 6 February 2010
African record  Christy Opara-Thompson (NGR) 7.02 Ghent, Belgium 12 February 1997
 Chioma Ajunwa (NGR) Liévin, France 22 February 1998
Asian record  Susanthika Jayasinghe (SRI) 7.09 Stuttgart, Germany 17 February 1999
European record  Irina Privalova (RUS) 6.92 Madrid, Spain 11 February 1993
9 February 1995
North and Central American
and Caribbean record
 Gail Devers (USA) 6.95 Toronto, Canada 12 March 1993
 Marion Jones (USA) Maebashi, Japan 7 March 1998
Oceanian Record  Sally McLellan (AUS) 7.30 Boston, United States 7 February 2009
South American record  Esmeralda de Jesus Garcia (BRA) 7.26 Pocatello, United States 13 March 1981

Qualification standards[edit]

Indoor Outdoor
7.37 11.25 (100 m)

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Round
March 12, 2010 18:25 Heats
March 14, 2010 16:00 Semifinals
March 14, 2010 18:10 Final

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

Carmelita Jeter topped her heat in 7.30 s
Yevgeniya Polyakova was one of the fastest through the first round

Qualification: First 4 in each heat (Q) and the next 4 fastest (q) advance to the semifinals.

Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 3 LaVerne Jones-Ferrette  United States Virgin Islands 7.14 Q
2 2 Veronica Campbell-Brown  Jamaica 7.21 Q
3 1 Myriam Soumaré  France 7.22 Q
4 2 Chandra Sturrup  Bahamas 7.22 Q
5 1 Yevgeniya Polyakova  Russia 7.26 Q
6 1 Tahesia Harrigan  British Virgin Islands 7.26 Q, SB
7 3 Véronique Mang  France 7.27 Q
8 4 Carmelita Jeter  United States 7.30 Q
9 5 Ruddy Zang Milama  Gabon 7.31 Q
10 5 Sheri-Ann Brooks  Jamaica 7.32 Q
11 4 Yuliya Katsura  Russia 7.34 Q
12 3 Olesya Povh  Ukraine 7.37 Q
13 5 Mikele Barber  United States 7.37 Q
14 2 Yasmin Kwadwo  Germany 7.38 Q
15 4 Digna Luz Murillo  Spain 7.38 Q
16 3 Lena Berntsson  Sweden 7.39 Q
17 2 Maria Aurora Salvagno  Italy 7.41 Q
18 4 Ivet Lalova  Bulgaria 7.42 Q
19 5 Lina Grinčikaitė  Lithuania 7.42 Q
20 3 Claire Brady  Ireland 7.43 q
21 4 Emma Rienas  Sweden 7.45 q
22 5 Folake Akinyemi  Norway 7.45 q
23 1 Joice Maduaka  United Kingdom 7.46 Q
24 2 Mariya Ryemyen  Ukraine 7.46 q
25 2 Marika Popowicz  Poland 7.56
26 1 Tatjana Mitić  Serbia 7.57
27 4 Virgil Hodge  Saint Kitts and Nevis 7.61 SB
28 4 Gloria Diogo  São Tomé and Príncipe 7.89 SB
29 2 Norjannah Hafiszah Jamaludin  Malaysia 7.90 NR, PB
30 1 Martina Pretelli  San Marino 7.94
31 5 Yelena Ryabova  Turkmenistan 8.27
32 3 Hawwa Haneefa  Maldives 8.31 PB
33 5 Angie Mangion  Malta 8.33 PB
34 1 Yvette Bennett  Northern Mariana Islands 8.68 PB
35 3 Ahamada Feta  Comoros DQ

Semifinals[edit]

LaVerne Jones-Ferrette ran the fastest time for both qualifying rounds
Sheri-Ann Brooks ran a new best to win her semi-final.

Qualification: First 2 in each heat (Q) and the next 2 fastest (q) advance to the final.

Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 2 LaVerne Jones-Ferrette  United States Virgin Islands 7.05 Q
2 1 Veronica Campbell-Brown  Jamaica 7.07 Q, SB
3 1 Ruddy Zang Milama  Gabon 7.13 Q, NR
4 3 Sheri-Ann Brooks  Jamaica 7.14 Q, PB
5 3 Carmelita Jeter  United States 7.15 Q
6 2 Chandra Sturrup  Bahamas 7.20 Q, SB
7 3 Myriam Soumaré  France 7.21 q
8 1 Tahesia Harrigan  British Virgin Islands 7.22 q, SB
9 2 Mikele Barber  United States 7.24
10 2 Yevgeniya Polyakova  Russia 7.24
11 1 Véronique Mang  France 7.28
12 3 Digna Luz Murillo  Spain 7.33
13 2 Lina Grinčikaitė  Lithuania 7.34
14 1 Joice Maduaka  United Kingdom 7.35
15 3 Yuliya Katsura  Russia 7.38
16 1 Emma Rienas  Sweden 7.38
17 1 Yasmin Kwadwo  Germany 7.39
18 3 Claire Brady  Ireland 7.40
19 2 Ivet Lalova  Bulgaria 7.41
20 3 Mariya Ryemyen  Ukraine 7.41
21 3 Lena Berntsson  Sweden 7.41
22 2 Olesya Povh  Ukraine 7.45
23 2 Folake Akinyemi  Norway 7.47
24 1 Maria Aurora Salvagno  Italy 7.49

Final[edit]

Campbell-Brown celebrating her gold medal performance for Jamaica
Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Veronica Campbell-Brown  Jamaica 7.00 PB
2nd, silver medalist(s) Carmelita Jeter  United States 7.05
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ruddy Zang Milama  Gabon 7.14
4 Sheri-Ann Brooks  Jamaica 7.14 PB
5 Chandra Sturrup  Bahamas 7.16 SB
6 Tahesia Harrigan  British Virgin Islands 7.17 SB
7 Myriam Soumaré  France 7.29
DQ LaVerne Jones-Ferrette  United States Virgin Islands (7.03)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Landells, Steve (2010-03-12). EVENT REPORT - WOMEN's 60 m Heats. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-17.
  2. ^ Landells, Steve (2010-03-14). EVENT REPORT - WOMEN's 60 Metres Semi-Final. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-17.
  3. ^ Landells, Steve (2010-03-14). EVENT REPORT - WOMEN's 60 Metres Final. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-17.
  4. ^ Gray, Aaron (2011-01-14). Top 10 V.I. sports stories of year. Virgin Islands Daily News. Retrieved on 2011-01-25.
  5. ^ 60 Metres - W Final. IAAF. Retrieved on 2011-01-25.
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