2010 New Zealand Music Awards

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2010 New Zealand Music Awards
Awarded for Excellence in New Zealand music
Sponsored by Vodafone
Date 7 October 2010
Location Vector Arena, Auckland
Country New Zealand
Hosted by
Website http://www.nzmusicawards.co.nz
Television/radio coverage
Network C4
Brown-haired man wearing a dark brown shirt holding a microphone and waving
Ben Hurley co-hosted the awards.

The 2010 New Zealand Music Awards was the 45th holding of the annual ceremony featuring awards for musical artists based in or originating from New Zealand. Finalists for the three technical awards were announced on 16 August 2010 with winners announced on 1 September, the date on which finalists for 16 'non-technical' categories were revealed.[1][2] Five 'non-technical' awards were presented without a group of finalists being selected.[2] The awards ceremony took place on 7 October 2010 at Vector Arena, Auckland. Hosted by television presenter Shannon Ryan and comedian Ben Hurley,[3] the ceremony was broadcast on television channel C4.[4] Various musicians, most of whom had been nominated for awards, performed songs on the awards night.

Gin Wigmore and Dane Rumble each received six nominations, while The Phoenix Foundation received eight nominations, including three in technical categories.[2] Wigmore's album Holy Smoke won three of the categories in which it was nominated, including Album of the Year, as well as the award for the highest selling New Zealand album. New Zealand-born Australian Idol winner Stan Walker won the People's Choice Award, as well as three awards featuring no finalists. "Just a Little Bit" by Kids of 88 was awarded the title of Single of the Year. Shihad won the Legacy Award, and were inducted into the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame.[5]

Nominees and winners[edit]

Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface.[2][6]

Key
 †  – Non-technical award
 ‡  – Technical award
A woman with blonde hair wearing a yellow shirt, playing a guitar and singing into a microphone
Gin Wigmore was nominated for six awards, winning four.
Man with spiked-up black hair and wearing black sunglasses and jacket singing into a hand-held microphone
Dane Rumble was nominated in six categories, winning Best Male Solo Artist.
A smiling woman wearing a red jacket leaning on a bench holding a cup. Her black hair is pulled back.
Anika Moa's Love in Motion won Best Female Solo Artist, as did her previous album, In Swings the Tide.[7]
Man with short, brown hair wearing a black suit.
Simon O'Neill won Best Classical Album with Father & Son: Wagner Scenes & Arias.
Two guitarists singing into microphones. In the background a drummer is also playing.
The Phoenix Foundation's album Buffalo won all three technical awards for its album cover, engineering and production.
Album of the Year† Single of the Year†
Sponsored by Vodafone
Sponsored by Vodafone
Best Group† Breakthrough Artist of the Year†
Sponsored by Steinlager
Sponsored by Pacific Blue Airlines
Best Male Solo Artist† Best Female Solo Artist†
Sponsor
Sponsored by Mazda
Best Rock Album† Best Pop Album†
Sponsored by PPNZ
Sponsor
Best Urban / Hip Hop Album† Best Aotearoa Roots Album†
Sponsor
Sponsored by Kiwi FM
Best Music Video Best Electronica Album†
Sponsored by C4
Sponsor
Best Gospel / Christian Album† Best Classical Album†
  • Edwin DerricuttThree Hours South
    • John Michaelz – Walk on Water
    • Magnify – Wonderland
  • Simon O'NeillFather & Son: Wagner Scenes & Arias
    • John PsathasUKIYO
    • NZTrio – Flourishes
    • Strike Percussion – Sketches
Peoples' Choice Award† Critics' Choice Prize†
Sponsored by Vodafone
Sponsored by Gravity Coffee
Highest selling New Zealand Single† Highest selling New Zealand Album†
No finalists were announced in this category.
At the time of the awards, "Black Box" had been certified double platinum, denoting over 30,000 sales.[8]
No finalists were announced in this category.
At the time of the awards, Holy Smoke had been certified triple platinum, denoting over 45,000 shipments.[9]
Radio Airplay Record of the Year† International Achievement Award†
No finalists were announced in this category.
Sponsored by New Zealand On Air
No finalists were announced in this category.
Legacy Award† Best Album Cover‡
No finalists were announced in this category.
Sponsored by The New Zealand Herald
Best Engineer‡ Best Producer‡
Sponsored by the Music and Audio Institute of New Zealand (MAINZ)
Sponsored by the Music and Audio Institute of New Zealand (MAINZ)

Presenters and performers[edit]

Presenters[edit]

A woman with long black hair wearing a red and black striped singlet. She is seated and playing a guitar in front of a microphone.
Brooke Fraser co-presented two awards, having won five awards in previous years.[10][11][12]

Presenters of awards at the ceremony:[13]

  • Irish Boyzone singer Ronan Keating and New Zealand pop musician Brooke Fraser presented the awards for Album of the Year and Single of the Year.
  • Actress Rose McIver and musician Liam Finn presented the awards for Best Group, Best Male Solo Artist and Best Female Solo Artist.
  • Actress Robyn Malcolm and songwriter Don McGlashan presented the awards for Best Pop Album, Best Rock Album and Breakthrough Artist of The Year.
  • Newsreader Samantha Hayes and footballers Winston Reid and Tim Brown presented the awards for Best Urban / Hip Hop Album, Best Aotearoa Roots Album and Best Electronica Album.
  • Entertainment reporter Kate Rodger presented the award for Best Music Video.
  • Film and television producer Dave Gisbon presented the awards for Gospel / Christian Album and Best Classical Album.
  • Rugby league players Lance Hohaia and Micheal Luck and the Vodafone 'Voice of the People' winner[nb 1] presented the People's Choice Award.

Performers[edit]

Performers at the ceremony:[13]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Vodafone 'Voice of the People' was a competition open to the public to co-present the People's Choice Award.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sundae, Hugh (16 August 2010). "Music awards technical finalists announced". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. Retrieved 24 October 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d Sundae, Hugh (1 September 2010). "NZ music awards finalists announced". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. Retrieved 1 September 2010. 
  3. ^ "New faces for awards". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. 22 July 2010. Retrieved 1 September 2010. 
  4. ^ "Ronan Keating to present at the VNZMAs". C4 (MediaWorks New Zealand). 30 September 2010. Archived from the original on 16 October 2010. Retrieved 16 October 2010. 
  5. ^ Kara, Scott (1 September 2010). "Shihad win NZ Herald legacy award and enter hall of fame". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. Retrieved 24 October 2010. 
  6. ^ "Gin and Stan win big at NZ Music Awards". ONE News (Television New Zealand). 7 October 2010. Archived from the original on 9 October 2010. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  7. ^ "Flight of the Conchords sweep Music Awards". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. 8 October 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2010. 
  8. ^ "Latest Gold / Platinum Singles". RadioScope. 14 February 2010. Archived from the original on 28 July 2011. 
  9. ^ "Latest Gold / Platinum Albums". RadioScope. 28 February 2010. Archived from the original on 28 July 2011. 
  10. ^ "Four dominate at 2004 music awards" (Press release). New Zealand Music Awards. 23 September 2004. Retrieved 17 November 2010. 
  11. ^ Hunkin, Joanna (19 October 2007). "Mint Chicks, Hollie Smith dominate NZ Music Awards". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. Retrieved 17 July 2010. 
  12. ^ New Zealand Press Association (8 October 2009). "NZ Music Awards Winners". Television New Zealand. Archived from the original on 18 July 2010. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 
  13. ^ a b "The 45th Annual RIANZ Vodafone NZ Music Awards Official Programme". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. 6 October 2010. lift-out booklet. 
  14. ^ "Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards" (Press release). Vodafone. 18 August 2008. Retrieved 11 November 2010. 
  15. ^ "Anika Moa Live at the 2010 VNZMAs". C4 (MediaWorks New Zealand). Archived from the original on 16 October 2010. 

External links[edit]