2011 G-20 Cannes summit

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G-20 Summit on Financial Markets and the World Economy
Sommet du G20 2011
Host country France
Date 3–4 November 2011
Venue(s) Palais des Festivals
Cannes, France
Participants G-20 (+ Ethiopia, Singapore, Spain, United Arab Emirates, Equatorial Guinea), AU, NEPAD, CCASG
Follows Seoul summit, 2010
Precedes Mexico summit, 2012
Website g20-g8.com

The 2011 G-20 Cannes Summit was the sixth meeting of the G-20 heads of government in a series of on-going discussions about financial markets and the world economy.[1]

The G-20 forum is the avenue for the G20 economies to discuss, plan and monitor international economic cooperation.[2] The summit resulted in little progress on the issues under discussion, although there was agreement to allow increased use of Capital controls as a defence against international speculators.[3][4]

Nicolas Sarkozy welcomes Barack Obama to the G20 meeting in Cannes, France, on 3 November.

Attendance[edit]

Leaders of the G20 countries present at the Cannes summit.

The prospective participants at the Cannes summit include leaders and representatives of the core members of the G-20 major economies, which comprises 19 countries and the European Union which is represented by its two governing bodies, the European Council and the European Commission.[5] Representatives of other nations and regional organizations are expected to take part in the summit.

State Represented by Title
Argentina Argentina[6] Cristina Fernández de Kirchner President
Australia Australia[7] Julia Gillard Prime Minister
Brazil Brazil[8] Dilma Rousseff President
Canada Canada[9] Stephen Harper Prime Minister
China China[10] Hu Jintao President
France France[11] Nicolas Sarkozy President
Germany Germany[12] Angela Merkel Chancellor
India India[13] Manmohan Singh Prime Minister
Indonesia Indonesia[14] Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono President
Italy Italy[15] Silvio Berlusconi Prime Minister
Japan Japan[16] Yoshihiko Noda Prime Minister
Mexico Mexico[17] Felipe Calderón President
Russia Russia[18] Dmitry Medvedev President
Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia[19] Ibrahim Abdulaziz Al-Assaf Minister of Finance
South Africa South Africa[20] Jacob Zuma President
South Korea South Korea[21] Lee Myung-bak President
Turkey Turkey[22] Recep Tayyip Erdoğan Prime Minister
United Kingdom United Kingdom[23] David Cameron Prime Minister
United States United States[24] Barack Obama President
European Union European Commission[25] Jose Manuel Barroso
-- projected co-leader of delegation
President
European Council[25] Herman Van Rompuy President
Invited states
State Represented by Title
Ethiopia Ethiopia[26] Meles Zenawi
-- projected leader of delegation
Prime Minister
Singapore Singapore[26] Lee Hsien Loong
-- projected leader of delegation
Prime Minister
Spain Spain[26] José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
-- projected leader of delegation
Prime Minister
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates[26] Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan[dubious ] Minister of Foreign Affairs
International organisations
Organisation Represented by Title
African Union[26] Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo Chairman
Basel Committee on Banking Supervision[27] Nout Wellink
-- projected leader of delegation
Chairman
CCASG[26] Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan
-- projected leader of delegation
European Central Bank[27] Mario Draghi[citation needed] President
Financial Stability Board[27] Mark Carney[citation needed] Chairman
Global Governance Group (3-G)[28] Sellapan Ramanathan
-- projected leader of delegation
International Labour Organization[29] Juan Somavía
-- projected leader of delegation
Director-General
International Monetary Fund[27] Christine Lagarde[30]/ Managing Director
NEPAD[26] Armando Guebuza[31]
-- projected leader of delegation
OECD[29] José Ángel Gurría
-- projected leader of delegation
Secretary-General
United Nations United Nations[29] Ban Ki-moon Secretary General
World Bank Group[27] Robert Zoellick
-- projected leader of delegation
President
World Trade Organization[29] Pascal Lamy
-- projected leader of delegation
Director-General

Protests[edit]

Since the 2008 G20 summit, protests have occurred at every summit. At the summit protesters donned Robin Hood caps and demanded a tax on international financial transactions in order to provide aid to poor countries instead of catering to banking and other financial institutions.[32] They also chanted slogans in opposition to "corporate greed" and supported a counter-G20 summit, "People First, Not Finance", organised by labour unions and NGOs such as Greenpeace and Oxfam. Though police reported 5,500 were part of the protests, the organisers estimated the number of protesters at 12,000. The riot police and helicopters limited the scope of the protests to a neighbourhood in the east of Nice, which was to host the alternative summit as well as the protests. Both Cannes and Nice also tightened security, with 12,000 police personnel being deployed.[33]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Legacies of the G20 Seoul Summit," Choson Ilbo (ROK). 13 November 2010; retrieved 13 February 2011
  2. ^ Parliament (UK): Townsend, Ian. "G20 & the November 2010 Seoul summit" (SN/EP/5028)[dead link], 19 October 2010, retrieved 2011-04-07; excerpt, "Today, we designated the G-20 as the premier forum for our international economic cooperation" citing "Pittsburgh G20 Leaders’ summit communiqué," ¶50 September 29, 2009, retrieved 2011-04-07; excerpt, "Today, we designated the G-20 as the premier forum for our international economic cooperation. We have asked our representatives to report back at the next meeting with recommendations on how to maximize the effectiveness of our cooperation. We agreed to have a G-20 Summit in Canada in June 2010, and in Korea in November 2010. We expect to meet annually thereafter, and will meet in France in 2011.
  3. ^ http://www.setimes.com/cocoon/setimes/xhtml/en_GB/features/setimes/features/2011/11/05/feature-02
  4. ^ Kevin Gallagher (2010-11-29). "The IMF must heed G20 decisions". The Guardian. Retrieved 2011-12-15. 
  5. ^ Rieffel, Lex. "Regional Voices in Global Governance: Looking to 2010 (Part IV)," Brookings Institution (US). 27 March 2009, retrieved 2011-04-06; "G20 members," Government of Canada, retrieved 2011-04-06.
  6. ^ Argentina, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  7. ^ Australia, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  8. ^ Brazil, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  9. ^ Canada, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  10. ^ China, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  11. ^ France, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  12. ^ Germany, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  13. ^ India, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  14. ^ Indonesia, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  15. ^ Italy, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  16. ^ Japan, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  17. ^ Mexico, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  18. ^ Russia, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011.
  19. ^ Saudi Arabia, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  20. ^ South Africa, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  21. ^ South Korea, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  22. ^ Turkey, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  23. ^ United Kingdom, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011
  24. ^ G20/2011 official site[dead link]; retrieved 12 February 2011
  25. ^ a b European Commission, G20/2011 official site; retrieved 12 February 2011.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g Secretariat General of the French Presidency of the G20 and G8, Invitation to Non-Members of the G20 to the G20 Summit of Cannes on November 3 and 4, 2011," 12 February 2011; retrieved 12 February 2011
  27. ^ a b c d e G-20, Home>Links>Institutional members; retrieved 12 February 2011
  28. ^ Jessop-Kolesnikov, Sonia. "As G-8 Meets, Asian Leaders Seek a Bigger Role," New York Times (US). 25 May 2011; excerpt, The Global Governance Group, conceptualized in April 2009 at the G-20 London Summit meeting, includes 28 countries: Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Botswana, Brunei, Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Jamaica, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Monaco, Montenegro, New Zealand, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, San Marino, Senegal, Singapore, Slovenia, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay and Vietnam"; retrieved 2011-05-26
  29. ^ a b c d G20-G8 France 2011, English>What is the G20?>Who are its members?; retrieved 13 February 2011
  30. ^ Fontevecchia, Augustino. "IMF Appoints Lagarde To Fix A Disgraced Institution," Forbes (US). 28 June 2011.
  31. ^ "Ethiopia - Meles Zenawi quits NEPAD leadership post - PANA reports". Nazret.com. Retrieved 2011-11-04. 
  32. ^ "G20 2011: Protests Ahead Of Summit In Cannes, France (PHOTOS)". Huffingtonpost.com. 2008-11-15. Retrieved 2011-11-04. 
  33. ^ Angelique Chrisafis in Nice. "Anti-G20 protests confined to Nice as police seal off 'fortress Cannes' | World news". The Guardian. Retrieved 2011-11-04. 

External links[edit]