2012 BX34

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2012 BX34
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Catalina Sky Survey
Discovery date 25 January 2012
Designations
Earth-crosser
(Aten asteroid)
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Aphelion 1.0332 AU (154.56 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.48892 AU (73.141 Gm) (q)
0.76105 AU (113.851 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.35757 (e)
0.66 yr (242.5 d)
1.48200135°/day
211.76° (M)
1.4845°/day (n)
Inclination 10.527° (i)
306.74° (Ω)
335.834° (ω)
Earth MOID 0.000288322 AU (43,132.4 km)
Jupiter MOID 4.09701 AU (612.904 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~8 meters (26 ft)[3][4]
1.80828 h (0.075345 d)[2]
~13.9[5] to 30.3
27.6[2]

2012 BX34 is a small Aten asteroid that made one of the closest recorded asteroid close approaches of Earth on 27 January 2012. It passed within 0.0004371 AU (65,390 km; 40,630 mi) of Earth during its closest approach at 15:25 GMT.[6] 2012 BX34 measures around 8 meters (26 ft) across; if it had impacted in 2012, it would have been too small to pass through Earth's atmosphere intact.[7]

During its 2012 close approach to Earth, 2012 BX34 had a brightest apparent magnitude of about 13.9,[5] making it about as bright as the dwarf planet Pluto. By 25 February 2012, it had dimmed to magnitude 30.[1] During its close approach of 0.0246 AU (3,680,000 km; 2,290,000 mi) on 28 January 2014,[6] it will only reach a magnitude of about 23.[8] 2012 BX34 has been observed in more detail using radar astronomy.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2012-B62 : 2012 BX34". IAU Minor Planet Center. 26 January 2012. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2012 BX34)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 27 January 2012. Retrieved 1 April 2016. 
  3. ^ "Images taken by legendary comet and asteroid hunter Rob McNaught tonight using T17 in Spain". iTelescope. 27 January 2012. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  4. ^ Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (26 January 2012). "2012 BX34 Goldstone Radar Observations Planning". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "NEODyS 2012BX34 Ephemerides for 27 January 2012". AstDyS-2 (Asteroids – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2012 BX34)". 27 January 2012. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  7. ^ AsteroidWatch (26 January 2012). "It wouldn't get through our atmosphere intact even if it dared to try". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "NEODyS 2012BX34 Ephemerides for 28 January 2014". AstDyS-2 (Asteroids – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 30 January 2012. 
  9. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 21 March 2012. 

External links[edit]