2012 DR30

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2012 DR30
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Siding Spring Survey
Discovery date February 22, 2012
(March 2009)
Designations
MPC designation 2012 DR30
2009 FW54
Trans-Neptunian object
Centaur[2]
Oort cloud object
Damocloid
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 5375 days (14.72 yr)
Aphelion 2512 ± 5.4 AU (Q)
~2049 AU[a]
Perihelion 14.55098 AU (2.176796 Tm) (q)
1263.5 ± 2.7 AU (a)
~1032 AU[a]
Eccentricity 0.98962 (e)
44913 ± 146 yr
~33100 yr[a]
0.0329976° (M)
0.0000187791°/day (n)
Inclination 77.95284° (i)
341.38873° (Ω)
195.4113° (ω)
Earth MOID 13.5911 AU (2.03320 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 9.29574 AU (1.390623 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 185 km[4]
~0.08[4]
B-V = 1.10
19.7[5]
7.1,[6] 7.1[3]

2012 DR30 (2009 FW54)[7][8] is a minor planet (trans-Neptunian object or extended centaur)[2] from the scattered disk/Inner Oort cloud. Using an epoch of December 2014, it has the second-largest heliocentric semi-major axis of a minor planet not detected out-gassing like a comet.[9] (2005 VX3 has a larger heliocentric semi-major axis.) 2012 DR30 does have a barycentric semi-major axis of 1032 AU.[10][a] The epoch of July 2018 will be when 2012 DR30 will have its largest heliocentric semi-major axis of 1644 AU.

2012 DR30 came to perihelion in March 2011 at a distance of 14.5 AU from the Sun (inside the orbit of Uranus).[3] For 2016, it will range from 16.5 AU to 17.3 AU from the Sun.[5] With an absolute magnitude (H) of 7.1,[6] the object has an estimated diameter of 185 km.[4][7]

With an observation arc of 14.7 years,[3] it has a well constrained orbit. It will not be 50 AU from the Sun until 2047. After leaving the planetary region of the Solar System, 2012 DR30 will have a barycentric aphelion of 2049 AU with an orbital period of 33100 years.[a]

Orbital evolution
Epoch Barycentric
Aphelion (Q)
(AU)
Orbital
period
yr
1950 2000 32000
2050 2049 33100

In a 10 million year integration of the orbit, the nominal (best-fit) orbit and both 3-sigma clones remain outside 12.5 AU (qmin) from the Sun.[2]

Comparison[edit]

2012 DR30 compared to some other very distant orbiting bodies including 90377 Sedna, 2015 DB216 (orbit wrong), 2000 OO67, 2004 VN112, 2005 VX3, 2006 SQ372, 2007 TG422, 2007 DA61, 2009 MS9, 2010 GB174, 2010 NV1, 2010 BK118, 2012 VP113, 2013 BL76, 2013 AZ60, 2013 RF98, 2015 ER61

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Given the orbital eccentricity of this object, different epochs can generate quite different heliocentric unperturbed two-body best-fit solutions to the semi-major axis and orbital period. For objects at such high eccentricity, the Sun's barycentric coordinates are more stable than heliocentric coordinates.[11] Using JPL Horizons, the barycentric semi-major axis is approximately 1032 AU.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ernesto Guido; Giovanni Sostero & Nick Howes (2012-02-27). "Trans-Neptunian Object 2012 DR30". Remanzacco Observatory in Italy. Retrieved 2013-08-25. 
  2. ^ a b c Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 12DR30". SwRI (Space Science Department). Archived from the original on 2016-02-05. Retrieved 2016-02-01. 
  3. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2012 DR30)" (last observation: 2014-04-20; arc: 14.04 years). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Archived from the original on 4 February 2016. Retrieved 25 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Kiss, Cs.; Szabó, Gy.; Horner, J. "A portrait of the extreme Solar System object 2012 DR30". Astronomy and Astrophysics. arXiv:1304.7112free to read. Bibcode:2013A&A...555A...3K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201321147. 
  5. ^ a b "AstDyS 2012DR30 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2016-07-01.  (Distance to Sun [R] from first day of 2016 to first day of 2017. Assuming average apparent magnitude for 2016.)
  6. ^ a b "2012 DR30 = 2009 FW54". IAU minor planet center. Retrieved 2013-07-11. 
  7. ^ a b Ian Musgrave (2012-03-01). "2012 DR30, no, it's not a comet, it's 2009 FW54". itelescope.net. Retrieved 2013-08-25. 
  8. ^ 2012 DR30 - Ein Transneptun mit ungewöhnlicher Bahn
  9. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: Asteroids and a > 100 (AU)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2014-10-15.  (Epoch defined at will change every 6 months or so)
  10. ^ a b Horizons output. "Barycentric Osculating Orbital Elements for 2012 DR30". Retrieved 2014-03-06.  (Solution using the Solar System Barycenter and barycentric coordinates. Select Ephemeris Type:Elements and Center:@0)
  11. ^ Kaib, Nathan A.; Becker, Andrew C.; Jones, R. Lynne; Puckett, Andrew W.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, Joshua A.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pan, Kaike; Quinn, Thomas; Schneider, Donald P.; Watters, Shannon (2009). "2006 SQ372: A Likely Long-Period Comet from the Inner Oort Cloud". The Astrophysical Journal. 695 (1): 268–275. arXiv:0901.1690free to read. Bibcode:2009ApJ...695..268K. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/695/1/268. 

External links[edit]