2013 24 Hours of Le Mans

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2013 24 Hours of Le Mans
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The race-winning No. 2 Audi R18 e-tron quattro
Circuit de la Sarthe track

The 81st 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 81e 24 Heures du Mans) was an automobile endurance racing event held from 19 to 23 June 2013 at the Circuit de la Sarthe at Le Mans, France. It was the 81st running of the event, as organised by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) since 1923. The race was the third and the premier round of the 2013 FIA World Endurance Championship, with 32 of the race's 56 entries contesting the championship. A test day was held two weeks prior to the race on 9 June. Approximately 245,000 spectators attended the event.

The race was won by the No. 2 Audi R18 e-tron quattro driven by Dane Tom Kristensen, Brit Allan McNish and Frenchman Loïc Duval after it led the last 248 laps, taking the manufacturers' twelfth victory at Le Mans since its first victory in the 2000 edition. It was Kristensen's ninth victory, McNish's third and Duval's first. The car started from pole position but lost the lead at the start to the sister No. 1 Audi of André Lotterer, Marcel Fässler and Benoît Tréluyer who traded the position with the No. 8 Toyota TS030 Hybrid of Anthony Davidson, Stéphane Sarrazin and Sébastien Buemi under pit stop rotation until it was forced into the pit lane in the seventh hour to correct a crankshaft position sensor fault. Buemi, Davidson and Sarrazin finished second and Lucas di Grassi, Marc Gené and Oliver Jarvis in the No. 3 Audi completed the race podium.

The Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category finished with the No. 35 OAK Racing Morgan car of Bertrand Baguette, Martin Plowman and Ricardo González ahead of the sister No. 24 entry of Alex Brundle, David Heinemeier Hansson and Alex Brundle by a distance of one lap. The class podium was completed by the No. 42 Greaves Motorsport Zytek Z11SN driven by Michael Krumm, Jann Mardenborough and Lucas Ordóñez. The No. 92 Porsche Manthey Racing 991 RSR of Romain Dumas, Marc Lieb and Richard Lietz won the Le Mans Grand Touring Professional (LMGTE Pro) class and the sister No. 91 vehicle of Jörg Bergmeister, Timo Bernhard and Patrick Pilet in second. Porsche also won the Le Mans Grand Touring Amateur (LMGTE Am) category with the No. 76 IMSA Performance Matmut car of Raymond Narac, Christophe Bourret and Jean-Karl Vernay, earning the marque its 100th class victory at Le Mans.

The result of the race meant Kristensen, McNish and Duval advanced to the top of the Drivers' Championship with 94 points. The championship leaders going into the race Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer fell to second while Davidson, Sarrazin and Buemi maintained third due to the trio's second-place finish. Di Grassi, Gené and Jarvis moved from sixth to fourth and the duo of Alexander Wurz and Nicolas Lapierre rounded out the top five. With 102 points, Audi increased their lead over Toyota in the Manufacturers' Championship to 35 points with five rounds left in the season.

Background[edit]

The 2013 24 Hours of Le Mans was moved forward one week after a request was filed by the world governing body of motorsport, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), in order to harmonise the 2013 motor racing calendar.[1] It was the 81st annual edition of the event,[2] as well as the third (and premier) of eight scheduled automobile endurance racing events of the 2013 FIA World Endurance Championship.[3] Going into the race, Audi Sport Team Joest drivers André Lotterer, Marcel Fässler and Benoît Tréluyer led the Drivers' Championship with 44 points, one ahead of their teammates Allan McNish, Tom Kristensen and Loïc Duval in second. Anthony Davidson, Stéphane Sarrazin and Sébastien Buemi of Toyota were third with 27 points. Rebellion Racing's Neel Jani, Nico Prost and Nick Heidfeld placed fourth with 20 points, and Andrea Belicchi, Mathias Beche and Cheng Congfu in the other team car rounded out the top five with 16 points.[4] In the Manufacturers' Championship, Audi (with 51 points) led their rivals Toyota with a 20-point advantage.[4]

Balance of Performance changes[edit]

The FIA Endurance Committee altered the balance of performance in three of the four categories to try and create parity in the classes. All hybrid and non-hybrid petrol powered LMP1 (Le Mans Prototype 1) cars received an additional 3 l (0.66 imp gal; 0.79 US gal) of fuel capacity for improved fuel mileage, allowing the Toyota TS030 Hybrid to run with a 76 l (17 imp gal; 20 US gal) fuel tank and the Rebellion Racing Lola B12/60s and the Strakka Racing HPD ARX-03c would have a fuel tank of 80 l (18 imp gal; 21 US gal) each.[5] Porsche received an increase in performance by allowing a 0.3 mm (0.012 in) larger air restrictor on the air intake of their engines in the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Professional (LMGTE Pro) and Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am) classes. Aston Martin had 10 kg (22 lb) of ballast added to its LMGTE Pro Vantage while the Chevrolet Corvette C6.R received a 25 kg (55 lb) reduction in weight. The Ferrari 458 Italia and the SRT Viper GTS-R had no performance changes.[6]

Entries[edit]

The automotive group Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) granted 56 invitations to the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Entries were divided between the LMP1, and LMP2 (Le Mans Prototype 2), LMGTE Pro and LMGTE Am categories. By the deadline for entries on 16 January, 71 applications had been filed with the ACO.[7]

Automatic entries[edit]

Automatic entries are earned by teams which won their class in the previous running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, or have won Le Mans-based series and events such as the American Le Mans Series, European Le Mans Series, and the Petit Le Mans. Some second-place finishers are also granted automatic entries in certain series. Entries are also granted for the winners of the Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge in the FIA World Endurance Championship. A final entry is granted to the champion in the Formula Le Mans category of the Le Mans Series, with the winner receiving their invitation in LMP2.[8] For the first time, champions in the American Le Mans Series or at the Petit Le Mans did not automatically receive an entry. Instead, the American Le Mans Series was given three "at-large" entries, which the series awarded to teams interested in participating at Le Mans.[9] As automatic entries were granted to teams, the teams were allowed to change their cars from the previous year to the next, but were not allowed to change their category. However, automatic invitations in the two GTE categories could be swapped between the two based on the driver line-ups chosen by these teams.[8]

On 14 November 2012, the list of automatic entries was announced by the ACO. JMB Racing and Conquest Racing were the two teams who chose not to accept their automatic invitations as they did not run in any series during the 2013 season.[8]

Reason Entered LMP1 LMP2 LMGTE Pro LMGTE Am
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans Germany Audi Sport Team Joest United States Starworks Motorsport Italy AF Corse France Larbre Compétition
1st in the European Le Mans Series France Thiriet by TDS Racing United Kingdom JMW Motorsport France IMSA Performance Matmut
2nd in the European Le Mans Series France OAK Racing Monaco JMB Racing Italy AF Corse
American Le Mans Series at-large entries United States Level 5 Motorsports
United States Conquest Racing
United States Extreme Speed Motorsports
1st in FIA WEC Michelin Green X Challenge Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Italy AF Corse
1st in European Le Mans Series FLM category Belgium Boutsen Ginion Racing

Entry list[edit]

In conjunction with the announcement of entries for the FIA World Endurance Championship and the European Le Mans Series, the ACO announced the full 56 car entry list and ten vehicle reserve list during a press conference at the Eurosites George V in Paris on 1 February. In addition to the 32 guaranteed entries from the World Endurance Championship, ten entries came from the European Le Mans Series, and eight from the American Le Mans Series, while the rest of the field was filled with one-off entries competing only at Le Mans.[10]

Garage 56[edit]

The ACO continued the Garage 56 concept that was started in the 2012 race. Garage 56 allows a 56th entry to the race, using the rigors of the 24 Hours of Le Mans to test new technology. The ACO announced during 2012 that the Swiss-developed GreenGT vehicle had been granted the Garage 56 entry for the 2013 edition.[11] The GreenGT LMP-H2 utilizes a hydrogen fuel cell to run electric motors within an open-top Le Mans Prototype style body.[11] Three weeks before the race, GreenGT withdrew their entry, citing a lack of time to complete the complex fine-tuning of the hydrogen fuel cell system. No reserve was available for the 56th garage.[12]

Reserves[edit]

Ten reserves were initially nominated by the ACO, limited to the LMP2 and both of the LMGTE categories.[10] Extreme Speed Motorsports announced that their Ferrari 458 Italia would be withdrawn on 1 March, after it made a late switch to the P2 category in the American Le Mans Series. This promoted the No. 98 Aston Martin Racing Vantage to the race entry as a result and the car was moved from LMGTE Am to the LMGTE Pro class to bring the number of Aston Martins in the event to five.[13] Two weeks later, Sébastien Loeb Racing withdrew its Oreca 03-Nissan because of financial troubles, promoting the No. 34 Race Performance Oreca-Judd entry from the reserves.[14] Starworks Motorsport, defending champions of Le Mans and the FIA World Endurance Championship in the LMP2 category, withdrew their HPD-Honda entry on 9 April due to a lack of funding from sponsors, promoting Morand Racing's Morgan-Judd.[15]

Ten days later, Gulf Racing Middle East withdrew the second of its Lola-Nissan B12/80s and DKR Engineering's Lola-Judd replaced the entry.[16] On 21 May, the ACO released a revised entry list that confirmed the withdrawal of Extreme Speed Motorsport's Ferrari 458 Italia, Sébastien Loeb Racing's Oreca 03-Nissan, Starworks Motorsports' HPD-Honda and Gulf Racing Middle East's Lola-Nissan B12/80 from the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[17] On 1 June, GreenGT Technologies announced the withdrawal of the Garage 56 entry, with Prospeed Competition's LMGTE Am Porsche 911 GT3 RSR being announced as its replacement.[18] By the start of the event, only a single reserve entry had not been promoted to the race.[19]

Testing and practice[edit]

A test day was held on 9 June, two weeks prior to the race, and required all entrants for the race to participate in eight hours of track time divided into two sessions.[20] All 56 entries were involved as well as a fourth Audi R18 e-tron quattro driven by Marco Bonanomi for 2014 tyre testing, a Signatech Alpine A450 for Paul-Loup Chatin and Tristan Gommendy and a spare Level 5 Motorsports HPD ARX-03b tested by Scott Tucker. Two Team Endurance Challenge-entered Le Mans Prototype Challenge Oreca-FLM09s also participated.[21] Wet weather swept the area during the day and had Audi set the fastest time with a 3 minutes and 22.583 seconds lap from Duval in the No. 2 car at the end of the second session. Lucas di Grassi in the sister No. 3 entry followed in second and Lotterer completed an all-Audi top three lockout in third. Toyota placed fourth and sixth with its best times coming from Sarrazin and Alexander Wurz; they were separated by Bonanomi's Audi.[22] During the first session, Duval was distracted by a unidentified object hitting his windscreen and heavily damaged the No. 2 car in the wall alongside the track at Tertre Rouge corner.[21][22] Olivier Pla's OAK Racing Morgan-Nissan was the fastest LMP2 car with a late second session effort of 3 minutes and 38.801 and he was eight-tenths of a second faster than Nelson Panciatici's Signatech Alpine.[22] LMGTE Pro was topped by Peter Dumbreck for Aston Martin Racing while Jamie Campbell-Walter also helped the marque lead in LMGTE Am.[22] Crashes from Tracy Krohn of Krohn Racing at the outside of Mulsanne corner, AF Corse's Giancarlo Fisichella leaving the same turn and Dominik Kraihamer for Lotus in the Porsche Curves led to stoppages during both sessions.[21]

Two days after the test day, Audi and Signatech Alpine held two half an hour practice sessions in the morning and the afternoon on the shorter and permanent Bugatti Circuit in wet weather conditions to ensure car components were working efficiently before the race.[23] Official practice was held on 19 June with the full 56-car field on track for four hours.[20] A torrential rain shower fell at Le Mans in the early afternoon but it tapered off before practice commenced and the track dried up during the session although light rain returned midway through and some cars spun.[24] Audi again led from the start with Tréluyer's No. 1 car setting a benchmark time until Duval went quickest with a 3 minutes and 25.514 seconds lap.[25] Marino Franchitti's No. 33 Level 5 Motorsports car was the early LMP2 pace setter until Alex Brundle's No. 24 OAK Racing Morgan moved to first but it was Bertrand Baguette's sister No. 35 entry who was fastest with a lap of 3 minutes and 42.813 seconds.[24] He was a second faster than Maxime Martin's No. 46 Thiriet by TDS Racing Oreca.[25] An hour into the session, Eric Lux crashed the No. 41 Graves Motorsport car heavily into the barrier entering the second Mulsanne chicane and the session was stopped due to debris on the track.[24] Lux was unhurt.[26] The LMGTE Pro class lead constantly changed with Richard Lietz's No. 91 Porsche 911 RSR fastest with Kamui Kobayashi's No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari two-tenths of a second adrift in second.[25] Kristian Poulsen's No. 95 Aston Martin was quickest in the LMGTE Am category.[24][25] Krohn had a high speed accident at the downhill Dunlop Esses and his car was launched about 20 ft (6.1 m) into the air before landing in the gravel trap, bringing a premature end to practice due to the large amount of damage to the barriers.[24]

Qualifying[edit]

The first dry session of the week occurred on Wednesday night in the first of three qualifying sessions.[20][27] Audi again led from the outset with Duval's early lap of 3 minutes and 23.169 seconds which he then improved to 3 minutes and 22.349 seconds.[n 1][27] The lap was not bettered for the remainder of the session, giving the No. 2 car provisional pole position.[29] Marc Gené's sister No. 3 car followed in second and Lotterer's No. 1 vehicle was third.[30] The two Toyotas replicated their test day results of fourth and sixth with drivers Kazuki Nakajima and Buemi although the former was second early in qualifying and a driveline problem curtailed the No. 8 Toyota's session at Arnage corner;[29] they were separated by the leading LMP1 privateer, the No. 12 Rebellion.[30] John Martin's No. 26 G-Drive Oreca set the only lap under 3 minute and 40 seconds in LMP2 with the best class lap of 3 minutes and 39.535 seconds, ahead of Franck Mailleux's No. 43 Morand Racing Morgan-Nissan and Brundle's No. 24 OAK Racing car.[30] Pierre Thiriet had a heavy accident at the second Mulsanne chicane, denting the barriers alongside the track, and ending the session 15 minutes early because repairs could not be completed in time.[29] The professional category of LMGTE was dominated by Aston Martin who took three of the first four places with the best time coming from Frédéric Makowiecki's No. 99 car as less than a second separated the top seven.[29] Allan Simonsen helped Aston Martin to be fastest in LMGTE Am and he narrowly eclipsed Paolo Ruberti's No. 88 Proton Porsche.[27][29]

The No. 2 Audi R18 e-tron quattro earned pole position in the hands of Loïc Duval during the first qualifying session.

Thursday's first qualifying session was affected by a waterlogged track after rain returned to the track with a short torrential downpour that fell minutes before the session commenced.[31] Track conditions improved progressively as it dried up but every lap time was slower than on Wednesday evening.[32] The best overall lap time of the session came from Davidson in the No. 7 Toyota with a time of 3 minutes and 42.507 seconds and the fastest Audi was the No. 3 entry of di Grassi in second. The second Audi driven by Fässler was third-fastest and the quickest privateer team was the No. 12 Rebellion in fourth. Davidson's No. 8 Toyota rounded out the top five.[32] In LMP2, John Martin continued to keep the No. 26 G-Drive car on top in the category while Tom Kimber-Smith drove the No. 41 Greaves Motorsport Zytek-Nissan on its first laps since it was repaired and was second-fastest in its class during the session and was provisionally 19th overall. The sister No. 42 Greaves car was third in the hands of Jann Mardenborough.[32] The No. 40 Boutsen Ginion Oreca-Nissan of Matt Downs crashed heavily into the inside barrier entering Indianapolis corner with its front. Downs was unhurt but qualifying ended early because repairs to the wall ran until after the session.[31][32] The LMGTE Pro class was led by Jan Magnussen's No. 73 Chevrolet Corvette C6.R while the LMGTE Am category was topped by the No. 96 Aston Martin of Stuart Hall with his teammate Poulsen in second.[32]

With the stoppage in the second qualifying session, the third session was expanded by half an hour in order to give teams more time on the circuit.[33] The track continued to be wet but it dried sufficiently enough to allow for improvement to lap times to be made with 20 minutes left as on-track grip continued to improve.[34][35] Two stoppages curtailed running in the session: the first was triggered for ten minutes when Christophe Bourret removed the left-front wheel off the No. 77 IMSA Performance Matmut car in an impact with the wall at the first Mulsanne chicane. Jonny Kane in the No. 21 Strakka Racing HPD ARX-03c caused the second red flag after he heavily clouted the barrier and littered debris at the second Mulsanne chicane.[35] Lotterer and his teammate di Grassi could not usurp Duval's time from Wednesday evening because they were caught out by damp patches on the circuit and the No. 2 started from pole position in the first Audi top three lockout on the Le Mans grid since the 2002 edition.[34] Toyota could not challenge Audi but Sarrazin improved the No. 8 car's best lap in the final seconds of third qualifying to start fourth and Nakajima's sister No. 7 vehicle qualified fifth. The No. 12 Rebellion Lola of Jani was the highest-placed privateer in sixth overall.[34][36]

LMP2 continued to be led by G-Drive because of John Martin's lap from first qualifying until Pla's No. 24 OAK Racing Morgan pushed hard in clear air to clinch the pole position in the category with a time of 3 minutes and 38.621 seconds recorded at the end of the session. The car was a second faster than the No. 26 G-Drive Oreca which began from the second position.[36] Oliver Turvey found improved pace in the No. 38 Jota Sport Zytek Nissan and bettered the car's best time to start third and thus making the top three in LMP2 to be represented by three manufacturers.[35] Stefan Mücke got the No. 97 Aston Martin to provisional pole position in LMGTE Pro but his teammate Makowiecki in the sister No. 99 car responded immediately to retake the position with a lap of 3 minutes and 54.635 seconds.[34] The No. 91 Porsche of Marc Lieb bettered the car's fastest lap time on the final lap of the third qualifying session to take third place on the starting grid.[35] The lead in LMGTE Am remained with the No. 95 Aston Martin as Simonsen improved his own provisional pole lap to a 3 minutes and 57.776 seconds to go more than a second faster than Proton Competition's Porsche.[34]

Qualifying results[edit]

Pole positions in each class are denoted in bold and by a double-dagger. The fastest time set by each entry is denoted in gray.

Pos. Class No. Team Qualifying 1[37] Qualifying 2[38] Qualifying 3[39] Gap Grid[40]
1 LMP1 2 Audi Sport Team Joest 3:22.349 no time 3:27.513 1double-dagger
2 LMP1 1 Audi Sport Team Joest 3:25.474 3:41.951 3:23.696 +1.347 2
3 LMP1 3 Audi Sport Team Joest 3:24.341 3:40.990 3:24.776 +1.992 3
4 LMP1 8 Toyota Racing 3:30.841 3:42.507 3:26.654 +4.305 4
5 LMP1 7 Toyota Racing 3:26.676 3:40.924 3:28.859 +4.327 5
6 LMP1 12 Rebellion Racing 3:30.423 3:42.261 3:28.935 +6.586 6
7 LMP1 13 Rebellion Racing 3:32.167 4:07.039 3:37.296 +9.818 7
8 LMP1 21 Strakka Racing 3:36.547 no time 3:45.173 +14.198 361
9 LMP2 24 OAK Racing 3:40.780 no time 3:38.621 +16.272 8double-dagger
10 LMP2 26 G-Drive Racing 3:39.535 3:53.998 3:45.468 +17.186 9
11 LMP2 38 Jota Sport 3:44.835 no time 3:40.459 +18.110 10
12 LMP2 43 Morand Racing 3:40.741 no time 3:43.839 +18.392 11
13 LMP2 25 Delta-ADR 3:40.925 4:12.200 3:45.147 +18.576 12
14 LMP2 47 KCMG 3:45.500 no time 3:41.042 +18.693 13
15 LMP2 48 Murphy Prototypes 3:44.538 no time 3:41.569 +19.220 14
16 LMP2 36 Signatech Alpine 3:43.835 4:06.213 3:41.654 +19.305 15
17 LMP2 35 OAK Racing 3:42.387 no time 3:41.854 +19.505 16
18 LMP2 49 Pecom Racing 3:43.420 4:00.127 3:44.637 +21.071 17
19 LMP2 46 Thiriet by TDS Racing 3:43.494 no time no time +21.145 371
20 LMP2 42 Greaves Motorsport 3:49.421 3:58.807 3:44.421 +22.072 18
21 LMP2 41 Greaves Motorsport no time 3:56.487 3:44.621 +22.272 19
22 LMP2 34 Race Performance 3:45.244 no time 3:51.498 +22.895 20
23 LMP2 32 Lotus no time 4:12.327 3:45.274 +22.925 21
24 LMP2 31 Lotus 3:47.920 no time 3:49.548 +25.571 381
25 LMP2 45 OAK Racing 3:48.196 no time 3:59.988 +25.847 22
26 LMP2 33 Level 5 Motorsports 3:48.597 4:03.528 3:53.861 +26.248 23
27 LMP2 28 Gulf Racing Middle East 3:49.096 no time 4:08.116 +26.747 391
28 LMP2 30 HVM Status GP 3:49.805 4:14.473 3:54.358 +27.456 24
29 LMGTE Pro 99 Aston Martin Racing 3:55.658 4:17.862 3:54.635 +32.286 25double-dagger
30 LMGTE Pro 97 Aston Martin Racing 3:56.004 4:25.834 3:55.445 +33.096 26
31 LMGTE Pro 92 Porsche AG Team Manthey 3:56.457 4:29.096 3:55.491 +33.142 27
32 LMGTE Pro 51 AF Corse 3:55.909 4:20.620 4:00.196 +33.560 28
33 LMGTE Pro 98 Aston Martin Racing 3:56.336 no time 4:01.283 +33.987 401
34 LMGTE Pro 71 AF Corse 3:56.471 4:25.740 3:58.078 +34.122 29
35 LMGTE Pro 91 Porsche AG Team Manthey 3:56.573 4:17.996 3:58.433 +34.224 30
36 LMP2 39 DKR Engineering 3:56.905 no time 4:03.613 +34.556 411
37 LMP2 40 Boutsen Ginion Racing 3:57.139 4:11.137 4:10.631 +34.790 421
38 LMGTE Am 95 Aston Martin Racing 3:58.661 4:19.486 3:57.776 +35.427 31double-dagger
39 LMGTE Pro 74 Corvette Racing 3:59.860 4:21.574 3:58.644 +36.295 32
40 LMGTE Am 88 Proton Competition 3:59.246 no time 3:58.889 +36.540 431
41 LMGTE Pro 73 Corvette Racing 3:59.526 4:11.034 4:02.189 +37.177 33
42 LMGTE Am 96 Aston Martin Racing 4:01.035 4:18.829 3:59.805 +37.456 441
43 LMGTE Am 61 AF Corse 4:02.815 4:24.897 3:59.997 +37.648 451
44 LMGTE Am 67 IMSA Performance Matmut 4:00.503 no time 4:50.043 +38.154 461
45 LMGTE Am 75 Prospeed Competition 4:11.719 no time 4:00.682 +38.333 471
46 LMGTE Pro 53 SRT Motorsports 4:03.127 no time 4:00.802 +38.453 34
47 LMGTE Am 77 Dempsey Del Piero-Proton 4:03.378 no time 4:00.916 +38.567 481
48 LMGTE Am 76 IMSA Performance Matmut 4:01.713 no time 4:15.101 +39.364 491
49 LMGTE Am 81 8 Star Motorsports 4:07.625 4:24.002 4:01.934 +39.585 501
50 LMGTE Pro 93 SRT Motorsports 4:03.461 no time 4:04.477 +41.112 35
51 LMGTE Am 55 AF Corse 4:03.966 4:22.194 4:05.924 +41.617 511
52 LMGTE Am 70 Larbre Compétition 4:04.512 4:38.739 4:29.068 +42.163 521
53 LMGTE Am 50 Larbre Compétition 4:04.873 4:31.216 4:09.723 +42.524 531
54 LMGTE Pro 66 JMW Motorsport no time no time 4:05.417 +43.068 541
55 LMGTE Am 54 AF Corse 4:09.064 no time 4:41.506 +46.715 551
56 LMGTE Am 57 Krohn Racing no time no time 4:16.233 +53.884 561
Pos. Class No. Team Qualifying 1 Qualifying 2 Qualifying 3 Gap Grid

Notes:

  • ^1  – The noted cars were moved to the back of the starting grid due to not having all three of their drivers setting qualifying lap times within 110% of the class leader's pole time.[41]

Race[edit]

Warm-up[edit]

The cars took to the circuit on Saturday morning for a 45-minute warm-up session in dry and clear weather conditions.[2][42] The No. 7 Toyota of Nicolas Lapierre set the team's fastest lap time of the weekend so far at 3 minutes and 26.227 seconds. McNish's No. 2 Audi was 0.504 seconds adrift in second and third was occupied by his teammate Fässler in the sister No. 1 car. The fastest LMP2 lap was set by John Martin's No. 26 G-Drive Oreca with a time of 3 minutes and 43.158 seconds, almost nine-tenths of a second faster than Brendon Hartley in the No. 48 Murphy Prototypes vehicle and Archie Hamilton's No. 25 Delta-ADR car was third. Porsche and AF Corse exchanged first in LMGTE Pro before Toni Vilander's No. 71 Ferrari set the best time in the category, while Patrick Long, driving the No. 77 Dempsey Proton Porsche, was fastest in LMGTE Am and second quickest amongst all LMGTE cars.[43] Several drivers went off the track during the session which had three crashes.[43] Kristensen hit the No. 67 IMSA Performance Matmut car of Pascal Gibon at Indianapolis turn and yellow flags were waved in the area because Kristensen was stranded in the grass to the inside of the circuit.[42][43] Philippe Dumas crashed the No. 70 Larbre Compétition Corvette into the tyre barrier at the Dunlop chicane halfway through the session and the No. 25 G-Drive car of Tor Graves blew its right-rear tyre on the run to the Porsche Curves and veered heavily into the inside barriers and debris was littered on the track. Graves was unhurt.[42]

Start[edit]

Allan Simonsen died from injuries he sustained during the ninth minute of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Approximately 245,000 spectators attended the event on race day.[44] Weather conditions at the start were damp and overcast. The air temperature throughout ranged from 12.8 to 18.3 °C (55.0 to 64.9 °F) and the track temperature was between 15.5 to 21.8 °C (59.9 to 71.2 °F).[45] The race began at 15:00 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00),[2] with Grand-Am Road Racing founder and NASCAR vice-chairman Jim France waving the French tricolour to signal the start the race.[46] Lotterer moved past McNish for the lead and then Lapierre overtook McNish for second at the second Mulsanne chicane but he lost the position at the exit of the corner. Lapierre then reclaimed second from McNish on the approach to Mulsanne turn. Davidson overtook di Grassi for second through the Ford chicane as Darren Turner's No. 97 Aston Martin took the lead of LMGTE Pro from his Aston Martin teammate Bell in the No. 95 car. Lapierre was closing on Lotterer when the safety cars were deployed for an accident at Tetre Rouge corner.[47] LMGTE Am leader Simonsen had pulled clear of the class field when nine minutes into the race the rear-left corner of his car lost traction on a kerb leaving Tetre Rouge corner.[47][48] When he attempted to correct, his car veered left and he collided heavily with the outside armco barrier at a near head-on trajectory.[48][49] The impact crushed the roof of the car and its supporting roll cage; its force launched it slowly back onto the circuit with a wheel and its doors detached.[50][51]

Medical personnel were swift to tend to Simonsen who was reported to be conscious and talking to officials before going into unconsciousness. He was extricated from the car and transported to the infield medical centre after about 20 minutes.[47][52] Simonsen was later declared dead from his injuries at the infield medical centre.[n 2] His partner Catrina requested Aston Martin Racing to continue racing in the event.[52][53] The safety cars remained on track for 58 minutes in which the LMGTE Pro order was divided into two halves.[47][52] When racing resumed, Lapierre dropped to fifth when he was overtaken by Davidson and the Audi duo of McNish of di Grassi within half a lap. Davidson took the overall lead for the first time on pit stop cycle rotation due to Toyota's better fuel economy over the Audis and kept it until the end of lap fifteen. Lieb moved to the front of LMGTE Pro by passing the Aston Martins of Rob Bell and Turner but the No. 91 Porsche lost the first position to Turner halfway through the second hour.[54] At the start of the third hour, Lotterer was demoted to second when Lapierre moved past him on the exit to Mulsanne corner but he was not recorded as the leader because he entered the pit lane at the end of lap twenty-seven. Rain returned to the track at this time as Turvey and Maxime Martin moved in front of Pierre Kaffer's No. 49 Pecom Racing Oreca for second and third in LMP2.[55]

The No. 2 Audi R18 e-tron quattro followed closely by the No. 8 Toyota TS030 Hybrid at Mulsanne corner

Lapierre stopped at the side of the Mulsanne Straight with a fuel pressure fault for half a minute before resuming in fifth. At the close of hour three, Gibon's No. 67 IMSA Performance Matmut car blew its left-rear tyre and lost the lead of LMGTE Am.[55][56] The rain later eased and Audi re-established its advantage in the first three overall while Brundle extended the No. 24 OAK Racing car's gap in LMP2 over Mike Conway after he went into the gravel trap at Mulsanne corner while lapping Hall's No. 99 Aston Martin and Matt Griffin assumed the lead in LMGTE Am. The main on-track action involved Lucas Luhr who ran wide in the Porsche Curves and glanced the inside barrier alongside the track but he continued without significant damage to the No. 38 Jota Sport Zytek.[57][58] Makowiecki moved past his Aston Martin teammate Mücke for the LMGTE Pro lead and Oliver Jarvis was delayed by the No. 39 DKR Engineering Lola through the Porsche Curves and lost third to Buemi. He retook the position from Buemi on the next lap. Later, Bill Auberlen relieved Mücke in the No. 97 Aston Martin and he was overtaken by Patrick Pilet's No. 92 Porsche for second in LMGTE Pro.[59] Seven minutes into the sixth hour, the left-rear tyre of Gommendy's No. 36 Signatech Alpine blew and disintegrated entering the Mulsanne Straight as he hit the barrier at Tetre Rouge turn. The safety cars were dispatched for 15 minutes for debris removal.[60][61]

Night[edit]

As the safety cars were recalled, David Heinemeier Hansson in the No. 24 OAK Racing Nissan collided with Duval's leading No. 2 Audi in the Porsche Curves, losing him the LMP2 lead to the No. 26 G-Drive car of Roman Rusinov. The safety cars were once again required for a short period of time as Kraihamer's No. 32 Lotus T128 shed its rear bodywork on the Mulsanne Straight and this nullified Tréluyer and Jarvis' advantage because Duval returned to second after he made a pit stop during the period.[60] When racing resumed, Duval reset the fastest lap of the race to 3 minutes and 23.269 seconds as Bruno Senna's No. 99 Aston Martin traded the lead of LMGTE Pro with Dumbreck's No. 97 car for two laps.[61] Two of three contenders for the outright victory ran into trouble soon after. Jarvis' No. 3 Audi made contact with slower traffic and his right-rear tyre was punctured and spun under the Dunlop Bridge. The tyre carcass fell off as he returned to the pit lane but repairs to the rear of the car were deemed unnecessary by his crew and the car returned to the circuit in fourth overall.[62] Later, the No. 1 Audi of Tréluyer was forced into the garage for 43 minutes to replace a failed crankshaft position sensor and gave the lead back to the sister No. 2 Audi of Duval and Sarrazin's No. 8 Toyota took over second.[44][63] Darryl O'Young had been the fastest driver in LMGTE Am at the time and brought the No. 55 AF Corse Ferrari into the class lead.[62]

The LMP2 class-winning No. 24 OAK Racing Morgan of Bertrand Baguette, Martin Plowman and Ricardo González.

John Martin's No. 26 G-Drive entry ceded the lead of LMP2 to Baguette's No. 35 OAK Racing car when he was instructed to enter the pit lane to have an illuminated door number panel repaired which took two laps to complete. The safety cars were deployed for a fourth time after 8 hours and 50 minutes when Graves spun his No. 25 Delta-ADR vehicle into the barriers at the Porsche Curves and scattered debris on the track. In the outright lead, the safety cars had divided the field into two with Kristensen increasing his lead to three minutes and seven seconds over Sarrazin.[64][65] Safety cars were required once again at the close of the ninth hour when Krohn spun and crashed his Ferrari in the Porsche Curves and retired.[66] Racing resumed ten minutes into hour ten with Gianluca Roda beaching the No. 88 Porsche into the gravel trap at the Dunlop Bridge and allowing actor Patrick Dempsey in the No. 77 Dempsey Proton car into the lead of LMGTE Am. Turner ran the No. 97 Aston Martin into the gravel at Mulsanne corner, allowing Lieb's No. 91 Porsche to pass him for second in LMGTE Pro. In LMGTE Am, Lorenzo Case's No. 55 AF Corse Ferrari returned to the category lead when Dempsey made a scheduled pit stop for fuel.[67] For 21 minutes, safety cars were needed as Tony Burgess destroyed the rear of the No. 30 HVM Status Lola in the Porsche Curves. Burgess was unhurt and he was transported to hospital for a precautionary check-up.[68][69]

As the race approached its halfway point, Howard Blank significantly damaged the No. 54 AF Corse Ferrari as well as the catchfencing at the Dunlop Esses and Tetre Rouge corner, causing an event record seventh safety car period.[70][71] Blank was unhurt and tried to return to the pit lane but he could not do so and retired. During the safety car period, the No. 99 Aston Martin had its brake discs changed and gave the LMGTE Pro lead to the No. 92 Porsche. The safety cars were due to be withdrawn just before the conclusion of hour 13 but heavy rain over much of the circuit extended it by nine minutes and several teams installed wet-weather tyres on their cars. Two laps after racing resumed, Lapierre's No. 7 Toyota got ahead of his teammate Buemi for second overall and he maintained until Buemi retook the position. Before the close of the 14th hour, Kane spun and beached the No. 21 Strakka car in the gravel trap at the Ford Chicane but got the car back onto the circuit.[71] Romain Brandela's No. 39 DKR Engineering Lola piled into the No. 55 AF Corse Ferrari and the No. 88 Proton Porsche before swerving in the front of Buemi's No. 8 Toyota at the Dunlop chicane. Luhr's No. 38 Jota Sport Zytek bowed out of a battle with the No. 42 Greaves Zytek of Michael Krumm for third in LMP2 when he entered the garage for repairs to his front wheel bearing.[72]

Morning to early afternoon[edit]

In the 16th hour, Richard Lietz brought the No. 92 Porsche to the pit lane and had its brake discs changed in four minutes, giving the lead of LMGTE Pro to Senna's No. 99 Aston Martin, which held a three-quarters of a minute advantage over him but Lietz lowered it by six seconds by the hour's end.[73] Light rain returned during the 17th hour but it was not heavy enough to affect the race. In LMGTE Am, Bourret led in the No. 76 IMSA Performance Matmut Porsche by a lap over Lorenzo Case's No. 55 AF Corse Ferrari while Dempsey in his No. 77 Porsche was being closed on by Marco Cioci's No. 61 car.[74] The 18th hour commenced with Auberlen's No. 98 Aston Martin emitting smoke from the car and leaking a large amount of oil down the Mulsanne Straight before stopping at Mulsanne corner. The safety cars were dispatched for 25 minutes to allow the oil to be dried by track marshals.[75] Racing resumed for only half a minute as the safety cars were needed to tend to repairs to a heavily damaged trackside barrier exiting the second Mulsanne chicane after Belicchi was about to lap a slower GTE Porsche but lost traction at the rear of the No. 13 Rebellion and veered right into the barrier. He returned to the pit lane for extensive repairs to the car's front.[76] When racing resumed, Lietz retook the LMGTE Pro lead. He held it until his spin at the Dunlop chicane delayed Dumbreck, allowing Senna in the class lead and Timo Bernhard's No. 91 Porsche into second.[77]

The No. 92 Porsche 991 of Marc Lieb, Richard Lietz and Romain Dumas won the LMGTE Pro class.

After the safety cars were withdrawn, Makowiecki relieved Senna in the No. 99 Aston Martin and pulled away from Lieb's No. 92 Porsche. Rain again fell on the circuit with five hours and fifteen minutes to go and some cars were caught in the change of conditions. Makowiecki veered to the left coming out of the second Mulsanne chicane and collided with the barrier head-on.[78] That ricocheted the car back to the centre of the track. Makowiecki was unhurt but the safety cars were again required as repairs were made to the barrier and Lieb became the new LMGTE Pro leader.[79] After racing continued, Nakajima's No. 7 Toyota cut the Dunlop chicane and launched over the kerb and spun backwards across the circuit. He rejoined without losing third. The rain eased and track conditions improved as Turner reduced Lieb's advantage at the front of LMGTE Pro to 8.8 seconds by the end of the 20th hour.[80] In the 21st hour, a miscommunication with the mechanics of Matteo Malucelli's No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari in his pit box released him with the fuelling hose attached to the car and into a collision with the No. 45 OAK Racing Morgan of Philippe Mondolot. Rain returned to the circuit during the hour and the No. 1 Audi of Lotterer aquaplaned into a gravel trap and narrowly avoided piling into Davidson's No. 8 Toyota on the Mulsanne Straight.[81][82]

The No. 3 Audi of Jarvis moved past Lapierre's No. 7 Toyota for third during pit stop rotation and Lapierre went off at the exit of Indianapolis corner as he battled to retake the position.[82] Kristensen's No. 2 Audi made a pit stop for a slow puncture as heavy rain returned with 90 minutes left and several cars aquaplaned on the saturated circuit.[83] Lapierre's No. 7 Toyota had no grip on the run into the Porsche Curves and veered deep left into the tyre wall at high speed. He exited the car but returned to it after losing two minutes. Baguette had an anxious moment going into Indianapolis turn in the No. 24 OAK Racing car but kept the LMP2 lead over his teammate Pla in the sister No. 25 car. The safety cars were again dispatched as the LMGTE Pro lead returned to Lieb's No. 91 Porsche from Mücke's No. 97 Aston Martin in pit stop rotation.[83][84] During the safety car period, Pla's No. 25 OAK Racing entry was separated from his teammate Baguette and was four minutes behind as the No. 6 Toyota was repaired in its garage and returned in fourth. Just before the safety cars entered the pit lane with half an hour to go, the No. 97 Aston Martin made a pit stop for tyres and made the LMGTE Pro battle against the two lead Porsches. More rain began to fall 15 minutes later and it turned into a deluge over the entire circuit as Kristensen's No. 2 Audi began the final lap.[85]

Finish[edit]

The No. 26 G-Drive Racing Oreca 03 was disqualified from third in LMP2 because of an oversized fuel tank.

The No. 2 Audi of Kristensen, Duval and McNish led the final 248 laps to claim the manufacturer's twelfth victory at Le Mans since its first at the 2000 race.[44][86] It was Kristensen's ninth overall victory since his first, McNish's third and Duval's first.[87] Buemi unlapped himself from Kristensen in the final half an hour but fell back a lap soon after. He, Davidson and Sarrazin's No. 8 Toyota finished second and the No. 3 Audi of di Grassi, Jarvis and Gené completed the overall podium in third.[87] On the podium, the Danish flag was flown at half-mast in memory of Simonsen and Kristensen dedicated the victory to him.[88] The No. 21 Strakka HPD ARX-03c of Kane, Danny Watts and Nick Leventis was unhindered after the demise of Rebellion and won the privateer LMP1 category in sixth overall.[44] OAK Racing won the LMP2 class with the No. 35 Morgan of Baugette, Ricardo González and Martin Plowman and the team's second car of Pla, Heinememer Hansson and Brundle was a lap behind for a second-place finish.[87] John Martin, Conway and Rusinov finished third in class in the No. 26 G-Drive Oreca but the car was disqualified because its fuel tank was found to be over the mandated limit of 75 l (16 imp gal; 20 US gal), promoting the No. 42 Greaves Zytek of Mardenborough, Krumm and Lucas Ordóñez to the category podium.[89] In LMGTE Pro, Porsche Manthey Racing claimed the category win on the Le Mans debut of the new 991-generation race car with drivers Lieb, Lietz and Romain Dumas in the No. 92 car, while the LMGTE Am class increased Porsche's total class victories at Le Mans to 100 with the No. 76 IMSA Performance entry of Jean-Karl Vernay, Raymond Narac and Bourret winning.[90]

Post-race[edit]

Simonsen was mourned by the motorsport community.[53] A memorial foundation was established in his honour by the Danish Automobile Sports Union and he was given a funeral in his hometown of Odense in Southern Denmark on 2 July.[91] Following Simonsen's death, the ACO announced the improvements to several sections of the circuit in December 2013. Tertre Rouge was re-profiled and new barriers and tire walls were added at the corner's exit onto the Mulsanne Straight. Run-off areas in the Corvette corners were expanded, and TecPro barriers were added behind the tire walls at the start of the Porsche corners. Large kerbs were added to the paved run-off at the second Ford chicane to deter cars from cutting the corner.[92] A new safety system was implemented, which allowed for the intervention of safety vehicles on a particular section of the circuit without the need for neutralising the entire race with safety cars. The system, termed a slow zone, requires cars to slow and maintain a speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) within a specific zone.[93]

With their victory, Kristensen, McNish and Duval became the new leaders of the Drivers' Championship with 94 points. Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer fell to second and were thirty points behind their teammates. Davidson, Sarrazin and Buemi's second-place result enabled the trio to remain in third while di Grassi, Gené and Jarvis' third-position result allowed them to advance from sixth to fourth. Wurz and Lapierre rounded out the top five drivers in the championship standings.[4] In the Manufacturers' Championship, Audi kept their lead with 102 points but increased it to thirty-five points over Toyota with five rounds left in the season.[4]

Race results[edit]

Class winners are marked in bold and by a double-dagger. Cars failing to complete 70% (244 laps) of winner's distance are marked as Not Classified (NC).[94]

Pos Class No. Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time/Retired
Engine
1 LMP1 2 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest United Kingdom Allan McNish
Denmark Tom Kristensen
France Loïc Duval
Audi R18 e-tron quattro M 348 24:01'16.436double-dagger
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Hybrid Diesel)
2 LMP1 8 Japan Toyota Racing United Kingdom Anthony Davidson
France Stéphane Sarrazin
Switzerland Sébastien Buemi
Toyota TS030 Hybrid M 347 +1 Lap
Toyota 3.4 L V8
(Hybrid)
3 LMP1 3 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Spain Marc Gené
United Kingdom Oliver Jarvis
Brazil Lucas di Grassi
Audi R18 e-tron quattro M 347 +1 Lap
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Hybrid Diesel)
4 LMP1 7 Japan Toyota Racing Austria Alexander Wurz
France Nicolas Lapierre
Japan Kazuki Nakajima
Toyota TS030 Hybrid M 341 +7 Laps
Toyota 3.4 L V8
(Hybrid)
5 LMP1 1 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Germany André Lotterer
Switzerland Marcel Fässler
France Benoît Tréluyer
Audi R18 e-tron quattro M 338 +10 Laps
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Hybrid Diesel)
6 LMP1 21 United Kingdom Strakka Racing United Kingdom Nick Leventis
United Kingdom Jonny Kane
United Kingdom Danny Watts
HPD ARX-03c M 332 +16 Laps
Honda LM-V8 3.4 L V8
7 LMP2 35 France OAK Racing Belgium Bertrand Baguette
United Kingdom Martin Plowman
Mexico Ricardo González
Morgan LMP2 D 329 +19 Lapsdouble-dagger
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
8 LMP2 24 France OAK Racing France Olivier Pla
United Kingdom Alex Brundle
Denmark David Heinemeier Hansson
Morgan LMP2 D 328 +20 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
9 LMP2 42 United Kingdom Greaves Motorsport Germany Michael Krumm
United Kingdom Jann Mardenborough
Spain Lucas Ordóñez
Zytek Z11SN D 327 +21 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
10 LMP2 49 Argentina Pecom Racing Argentina Luís Pérez Companc
Germany Pierre Kaffer
France Nicolas Minassian
Oreca 03 M 325 +23 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
11 LMP2 43 Switzerland Morand Racing Switzerland Natacha Gachnang
France Franck Mailleux
France Olivier Lombard
Morgan LMP2 D 320 +28 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
12 LMP2 48 Republic of Ireland Murphy Prototypes New Zealand Brendon Hartley
India Karun Chandhok
United States Mark Patterson
Oreca 03 D 319 +29 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
13 LMP2 38 United Kingdom Jota Sport United Kingdom Simon Dolan
United Kingdom Oliver Turvey
Germany Lucas Luhr
Zytek Z11SN D 319 +29 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
14 LMP2 36 France Signatech-Alpine France Pierre Ragues
France Nelson Panciatici
France Tristan Gommendy
Alpine A450 M 317 +31 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
15 LMGTE
Pro
92 Germany Porsche AG Team Manthey Germany Marc Lieb
Austria Richard Lietz
France Romain Dumas
Porsche 911 RSR M 315 +33 Lapsdouble-dagger
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
16 LMGTE
Pro
91 Germany Porsche AG Team Manthey Germany Jörg Bergmeister
Germany Timo Bernhard
France Patrick Pilet
Porsche 911 RSR M 315 +33 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
17 LMGTE
Pro
97 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing United Kingdom Darren Turner
United Kingdom Peter Dumbreck
Germany Stefan Mücke
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 314 +34 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
18 LMP2 34 Switzerland Race Performance Switzerland Michel Frey
Switzerland Patric Niederhauser
Netherlands Jeroen Bleekemolen
Oreca 03 D 314 +34 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
19 LMGTE
Pro
73 United States Corvette Racing Spain Antonio García
Denmark Jan Magnussen
United States Jordan Taylor
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 312 +36 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
20 LMGTE
Pro
71 Italy AF Corse Monaco Olivier Beretta
Japan Kamui Kobayashi
Finland Toni Vilander
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 312 +36 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
21 LMGTE
Pro
51 Italy AF Corse Italy Gianmaria Bruni
Italy Giancarlo Fisichella
Italy Matteo Malucelli
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 311 +37 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
22 LMGTE
Pro
74 United States Corvette Racing United Kingdom Oliver Gavin
United Kingdom Richard Westbrook
United States Tommy Milner
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 309 +39 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
23 LMP2 41 United Kingdom Greaves Motorsport United States Alexander Rossi
United States Eric Lux
United Kingdom Tom Kimber-Smith
Zytek Z11SN D 307 +41 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
24 LMGTE
Pro
53 United States SRT Motorsports Belgium Marc Goossens
Germany Dominik Farnbacher
United Kingdom Ryan Dalziel
SRT Viper GTS-R M 306 +42 Laps
SRT 8.0 L V10
25 LMGTE
Am
76 France IMSA Performance Matmut France Raymond Narac
France Christophe Bourret
France Jean-Karl Vernay
Porsche 911 GT3 RSR M 306 +42 Lapsdouble-dagger
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
26 LMGTE
Am
55 Italy AF Corse Italy Piergiuseppe Perazzini
Italy Lorenzo Casè
Hong Kong Darryl O'Young
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 305 +43 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
27 LMGTE
Am
61 Italy AF Corse South Africa Jack Gerber
Republic of Ireland Matt Griffin
Italy Marco Cioci
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 305 +43 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
28 LMGTE
Am
77 United States Dempsey Del Piero-Proton United States Patrick Dempsey
United States Patrick Long
United States Joe Foster
Porsche 911 GT3 RSR M 305 +43 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
29 LMGTE
Am
50 France Larbre Compétition France Julien Canal
France Patrick Bornhauser
United States Ricky Taylor
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 302 +46 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
30 LMGTE
Am
96 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Germany Roald Goethe
United Kingdom Jamie Campbell-Walter
United Kingdom Stuart Hall
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 301 +47 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
31 LMGTE
Pro
93 United States SRT Motorsports United States Tommy Kendall
United States Jonathan Bomarito
Canada Kuno Wittmer
SRT Viper GTS-R M 301 +47 Laps
SRT 8.0 L V10
32 LMP2 40 Belgium Boutsen Ginion Racing France Thomas Dagoneou
United States Matt Downs
United States Rodin Younessi
Oreca 03 D 300 +48 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
33 LMGTE
Am
67 France IMSA Performance Matmut France Pascal Gibon
France Patrice Milesi
Germany Wolf Henzler
Porsche 911 GT3 RSR M 300 +48 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
34 LMGTE
Pro
66 United Kingdom JMW Motorsport Italy Andrea Bertolini
Saudi Arabia Abdulaziz al Faisal
United Arab Emirates Khaled al Qubaisi
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 D 300 +48 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
35 LMGTE
Am
88 Germany Proton Competition Germany Christian Ried
Italy Gianluca Roda
Italy Paolo Ruberti
Porsche 911 GT3 RSR M 300 +48 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
36 LMGTE
Am
75 Belgium Prospeed Competition France Emmanuel Collard
France François Perrodo
France Sebastien Crubilé
Porsche 911 GT3 RSR M 298 +50 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
37 LMGTE
Am
81 United States 8 Star Motorsports Venezuela Enzo Potolicchio
Portugal Rui Águas
Australia Jason Bright
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 294 +54 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
38 LMP2 39 Luxembourg DKR Engineering France Olivier Porta
France Romain Brandela
France Stéphane Raffin
Lola B11/40 D 280 +68 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
39 LMP1 12 Switzerland Rebellion Racing France Nicolas Prost
Switzerland Neel Jani
Germany Nick Heidfeld
Lola B12/60 M 275 +73 Laps
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
40 LMP1 13 Switzerland Rebellion Racing Switzerland Mathias Beche
Italy Andrea Belicchi
China Congfu Cheng
Lola B12/60 M 275 +73 Laps
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
41 LMGTE
Am
70 France Larbre Compétition United States Cooper MacNeil
France Manuel Rodrigues
France Philippe Dumas
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 268 +80 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
NC LMP2 33 United States Level 5 Motorsports United States Scott Tucker
United Kingdom Marino Franchitti
Australia Ryan Briscoe
HPD ARX-03b M 242 Not classified
Honda HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP2 46 France Thiriet by TDS Racing France Pierre Thiriet
France Ludovic Badey
Belgium Maxime Martin
Oreca 03 D 310 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
99 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Brazil Bruno Senna
France Frédéric Makowiecki
United Kingdom Rob Bell
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 248 Accident
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 45 France OAK Racing France Jacques Nicolet
France Jean-Marc Merlin
France Philippe Mondolot
Morgan LMP2 D 246 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 47 China KCMG Switzerland Alexandre Imperatori
United Kingdom Matt Howson
China Ho-Pin Tung
Morgan LMP2 M 241 Oil leak
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
98 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Canada Paul Dalla Lana
United States Bill Auberlen
Portugal Pedro Lamy
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 221 Engine
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 32 Czech Republic Lotus Germany Thomas Holzer
Austria Dominik Kraihamer
Czech Republic Jan Charouz
Lotus T128 D 219 Gearbox
Praga 3.6 L V8
DNF LMP2 30 Canada HVM Status GP United Kingdom Johnny Mowlem
Canada Tony Burgess
Switzerland Jonathan Hirschi
Lola B12/80 D 153 Accident
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
54 Italy AF Corse France Yannick Mallégol
France Jean-Marc Bachelier
United States Howard Blank
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 147 Accident
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
57 United States Krohn Racing United States Tracy Krohn
Sweden Niclas Jönsson
Italy Maurizio Mediani
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 111 Accident
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 25 United Kingdom Delta-ADR Thailand Tor Graves
United Kingdom Archie Hamilton
Japan Shinji Nakano
Oreca 03 D 101 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 28 United Arab Emirates Gulf Racing Middle East France Fabien Giroix
France Philippe Haezebrouck
Japan Keiko Ihara
Lola B12/80 D 22 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 31 Czech Republic Lotus United States Kevin Weeda
United Kingdom James Rossiter
France Christophe Bouchut
Lotus T128 D 17 Electrical
Praga 3.6 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
95 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Denmark Allan Simonsen
Denmark Kristian Poulsen
Denmark Christoffer Nygaard
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 2 Accident
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
EX LMP2 26 Russia G-Drive Racing Russia Roman Rusinov
Australia John Martin
United Kingdom Mike Conway
Oreca 03 M  – Disqualified[n 3]
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8

Standings after the race[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Loïc Duval's time was one and a half second faster than the 2012 pole position lap.[28]
  2. ^ Allan Simonsen was the first driver to die at the 24 Hours of Le Mans since Sébastien Enjolras during pre-qualifying for the 1997 race and the first during the race itself since Jo Gartner in the 1986 edition.[53]
  3. ^ The No. 26 G-Drive Racing Oreca 03 was disqualifed as its fuel tanks was found to exceed the maximum limit of 75 l (16 imp gal; 20 US gal).[89]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Carter, Jeff (28 September 2012). "FIA WEC Unveils 2013 Provisional Calendar". FIA World Endurance Championship. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "WEC Classification". FIA World Endurance Championship. Archived from the original on 28 January 2014. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
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  8. ^ a b c Mercier, Laurent (14 November 2012). "Treize équipes sélectionnées aux 24 Heures du Mans 2013 !" (in French). Endurance-Info. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  9. ^ Dagys, John (10 September 2012). "ALMS: Rebellion Targets Petit Le Mans Win". Speed. Archived from the original on 12 September 2016. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
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