2013 ET

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2013 ET
Asteroid20130318-full.jpg
Radar imaging of 2013 ET
Discovery[1]
Discovered byCatalina Sky Survey
Discovery siteMount Lemmon Obs.
(first observed only)
Discovery dateMarch 3, 2013
Designations
MPC designation2013 ET
MPO 307059
NEO · Apollo
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3[1]
Observation arc6[1] d
Aphelion1.66881 AU (249.650 Gm)
Perihelion0.74239 AU (111.060 Gm)
1.20560 AU (180.355 Gm)
Eccentricity0.38421
1.32 yr (483.506 d)
1.32 yr
97.151°
0° 44m 39.048s /day[1]
Inclination4.85153°
171.316°
81.911°
Earth MOID0.00375179 AU (561,260 km)[2]
Mercury MOID0.28725 AU (42,972,000 km)[1]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions100 m (330 ft)[3]
23.1[2]

2013 ET is a near-Earth asteroid that was first observed on March 3, 2013,[4] six days before its closest approach to Earth. It is estimated to be around 100 meters (330 feet) wide.[3][5]

Its closest approach to Earth was 0.0065207 AU (975,480 km; 606,140 mi) on March 9, 2013 at 12:09 UT.[2][6] The asteroid also makes close approaches to Mars and Venus.[2] The asteroid was imaged by Goldstone radar on March 10, 2013.[7]

2013 ET was one of four asteroids that passed in the vicinity of Earth during one week in early March 2013.[8] The other asteroids in this group besides 2013 ET, included 2013 EC, 2013 EC20, and 2013 EN20.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "2013 ET". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e "(2013 ET)". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 3629117. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b Wall, Mike (5 March 2013). "Big Asteroid to Zoom By Earth This Weekend". Space.com.
  4. ^ "MPEC 2013-E14 : 2013 ET". IAU Minor Planet Center. 4 March 2012. Retrieved 9 March 2012. (K13E00T)
  5. ^ Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (7 March 2013). "2013 ET Goldstone Radar Observations Planning". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  6. ^ Gray, Melissa (7 March 2013). "Asteroid to fly past Earth this weekend". Light Years. CNN.
  7. ^ DC Agle (18 March 2013). "Goldstone Radar Snags Images of Asteroid 2013 ET". NASA/JPL. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  8. ^ "Four Asteroids Buzz Earth in Single Week". Space.com. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  9. ^ "Four Asteroids Buzz Earth in Single Week". Space.com. Retrieved 13 November 2018.

External links[edit]