2013 Federated Auto Parts 400

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2013 Federated Auto Parts 400
Race details[1]
Race 26 of 36 in the 2013 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series season
Richmond International Speedway
Richmond International Speedway
Date September 7, 2013 (2013-09-07)
Location Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, Virginia, United States
Course Permanent racing facility
0.75 mi (1.2 km)
Distance 400 laps, 300 mi (482.803 km)
Weather Temperatures up to 81 °F (27 °C); wind speeds up to 8 miles per hour (13 km/h)[2]
Pole position
Driver Hendrick Motorsports
Time 20.674 seconds
Most laps led
Driver Brad Keselowski Penske Racing
Laps 142
Winner
No. 99 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing
Television in the United States
Network ABC
Announcers Allen Bestwick, Dale Jarrett and Andy Petree

The 2013 Federated Auto Parts 400 was a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series stock car race held on September 7, 2013, at Richmond International Raceway in Richmond, Virginia, United States. Contested over 400 laps, it was the twenty-sixth and final race leading into the Chase for the Sprint Cup in the 2013 Sprint Cup Series season. Carl Edwards of Roush Fenway Racing won the race, his second win of the season, while Kurt Busch finished second. Ryan Newman, Jamie McMurray, and Paul Menard rounded out the top five.

The race was the first for Harry Scott, Jr. as a Sprint Cup Series team owner; Ryan Truex drove the #51 car in Scott's debut.

The race was marred by controversy in which two teams were found to have manipulated the outcome of the race and Chase positions in the final ten laps. NASCAR ultimately determined that Michael Waltrip Racing, Penske Racing, and Front Row Motorsports were involved in two separate, but intertwined, incidents, first by Clint Bowyer intentionally causing a caution with less than ten laps remaining in the race, and on the ensuing restart, having Brian Vickers pit after a restart from caution so that Martin Truex, Jr. would clinch a Wildcard berth over Ryan Newman, and the second was collusion where Penske's Joey Logano earned the final guaranteed berth over Jeff Gordon after passing Front Row's David Gilliland. Both situations were intertwined together because of the tenth place and wild card situation. This scandal became widely known as Spingate from Bowyer's intentional spin.

Results[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Pos No. Driver Team Make Speed Time
1 24 Jeff Gordon Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 130.599 20.674
2 78 Kurt Busch Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet 130.334 20.716
3 2 Brad Keselowski Penske Racing Ford 130.158 20.744
4 15 Clint Bowyer Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 130.020 20.766
5 20 Matt Kenseth Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 129.864 20.791
6 11 Denny Hamlin Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 129.851 20.793
7 1 Jamie McMurray Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 129.689 20.819
8 22 Joey Logano Penske Racing Ford 129.633 20.828
9 16 Greg Biffle Roush Fenway Racing Ford 129.366 20.871
10 48 Regan Smith1 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 129.286 20.884
11 56 Martin Truex, Jr. Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 129.224 20.894
12 42 Juan Pablo Montoya Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 129.125 20.910
13 18 Kyle Busch Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 129.119 20.911
14 88 Dale Earnhardt Jr. Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 129.069 20.919
15 43 Aric Almirola Richard Petty Motorsports Ford 129.057 20.921
16 14 Mark Martin Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 129.026 20.926
17 29 Kevin Harvick Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 128.995 20.931
18 5 Kasey Kahne Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 128.946 20.939
19 31 Jeff Burton Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 128.817 20.960
20 55 Brian Vickers Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 128.743 20.972
21 17 Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Roush Fenway Racing Ford 128.584 20.998
22 27 Paul Menard Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 128.559 21.002
23 34 David Ragan Front Row Motorsports Ford 128.486 21.014
24 39 Ryan Newman Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 128.382 21.031
25 13 Casey Mears Germain Racing Ford 128.351 21.036
26 99 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford 128.290 21.046
27 35 Josh Wise Front Row Motorsports Ford 128.272 21.049
28 40 Landon Cassill Circle Sport Chevrolet 128.254 21.052
29 30 David Stremme Swan Racing Toyota 128.077 21.081
30 98 Michael McDowell Phil Parsons Racing Ford 128.047 21.086
31 87 Joe Nemechek NEMCO-Jay Robinson Racing Toyota 127.847 21.119
32 9 Marcos Ambrose Richard Petty Motorsports Ford 127.799 21.127
33 93 Travis Kvapil BK Racing Toyota 127.690 21.145
34 47 A. J. Allmendinger JTG Daugherty Racing Toyota 127.527 21.172
35 83 David Reutimann BK Racing Toyota 127.401 21.193
36 10 Danica Patrick Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 127.286 21.212
37 38 David Gilliland Front Row Motorsports Ford 127.250 21.218
38 51 Ryan Truex Harry Scott, Jr. Chevrolet 127.095 21.244
39 95 Reed Sorenson Leavine Family Racing Ford 126.630 21.322
40 7 Dave Blaney Tommy Baldwin Racing Chevrolet 126.399 21.361
41 33 Tony Raines Circle Sport Chevrolet 126.139 21.405
42 32 Ken Schrader FAS Lane Racing Ford 125.874 21.450
43 36 J. J. Yeley Tommy Baldwin Racing Chevrolet 125.774 21.467
Failed to Qualify
44 19 Mike Bliss Humphrey Smith Racing Toyota 127.208 21.225
Source:[3]

1 Regan Smith drove the No. 48 car for practice and qualifying; Jimmie Johnson was on paternity leave.

Race[edit]

Pos Grid No. Driver Team Make Laps Race Status Led Points
1 26 99 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford 400 Running 46 47
2 2 78 Kurt Busch Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 73 43
3 24 39 Ryan Newman Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 4 42
4 7 1 Jamie McMurray Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 6 41
5 22 27 Paul Menard Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 3 40
6 5 20 Matt Kenseth Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 400 Running 5 39
7 11 56 Martin Truex, Jr. Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 400 Running 0 37
8 1 24 Jeff Gordon Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 400 Running 49 37
9 16 14 Mark Martin Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 0 35
10 21 17 Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. Roush Fenway Racing Ford 400 Running 0 34
11 17 29 Kevin Harvick Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 0 33
12 9 16 Greg Biffle Roush Fenway Racing Ford 400 Running 0 32
13 14 88 Dale Earnhardt, Jr. Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 400 Running 0 31
14 18 5 Kasey Kahne Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 400 Running 0 30
15 34 47 A. J. Allmendinger JTG Daugherty Racing Toyota 400 Running 0 29
16 12 42 Juan Pablo Montoya Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 0 28
17 3 2 Brad Keselowski Penske Racing Ford 400 Running 142 29
18 19 31 Jeff Burton Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 400 Running 0 26
19 13 18 Kyle Busch Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 400 Running 0 25
20 15 43 Aric Almirola Richard Petty Motorsports Ford 400 Running 0 24
21 6 11 Denny Hamlin Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 399 Running 0 23
22 8 22 Joey Logano Penske Racing Ford 399 Running 0 22
23 37 38 David Gilliland Front Row Motorsports Ford 399 Running 0 21
24 20 55 Brian Vickers Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 399 Running 0 0
25 4 15 Clint Bowyer Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 398 Running 72 20
26 25 13 Casey Mears Germain Racing Ford 397 Running 0 18
27 32 9 Marcos Ambrose Richard Petty Motorsports Ford 397 Running 0 17
28 33 93 Travis Kvapil BK Racing Toyota 397 Running 0 16
29 23 34 David Ragan Front Row Motorsports Ford 397 Running 0 15
30 36 10 Danica Patrick Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 396 Running 0 14
31 40 7 Dave Blaney Tommy Baldwin Racing Chevrolet 396 Running 0 13
32 35 83 David Reutimann BK Racing Toyota 395 Running 0 12
33 41 33 Tony Raines Circle Sport Chevrolet 395 Running 0 0
34 28 40 Landon Cassill Circle Sport Chevrolet 395 Running 0 0
35 38 51 Ryan Truex Harry Scott, Jr. Chevrolet 395 Running 0 0
36 43 36 J. J. Yeley Tommy Baldwin Racing Chevrolet 393 Running 0 8
37 42 32 Ken Schrader FAS Lane Racing Ford 393 Running 0 7
38 29 30 David Stremme Swan Racing Toyota 391 Running 0 6
39 31 87 Joe Nemechek NEMCO-Jay Robinson Racing Toyota 388 Running 0 0
40 10 48 Jimmie Johnson Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 372 Running 0 4
41 27 35 Josh Wise Front Row Motorsports Ford 142 Vibration 0 0
42 39 95 Reed Sorenson Leavine Family Racing Ford 126 Brakes 0 0
43 30 98 Michael McDowell Phil Parsons Racing Ford 76 Brakes 0 1
Source:[4]

Final Chase for the Cup statistics[edit]

Driver's points
(post-race) - Sunday, September 8 (post-penalties) - Friday, September 13
Pos Driver Points Wins Top 5 Top 10 Pos Driver Points Wins Top 5 Top 10
1 Matt Kenseth 2015 5 6 13 1 Matt Kenseth 2015 5 6 13
2 Jimmie Johnson 2012 4 9 15 2 Jimmie Johnson 2012 4 9 15
3 Kyle Busch 2012 4 11 15 3 Kyle Busch 2012 4 11 15
4 Kevin Harvick 2006 2 6 13 4 Kevin Harvick 2006 2 6 13
5 Carl Edwards 2006 2 8 13 5 Carl Edwards 2006 2 8 13
6 Joey Logano 2003 1 8 14 6 Joey Logano 2003 1 8 14
7 Greg Biffle 2003 1 3 10 7 Greg Biffle 2003 1 3 10
8 Clint Bowyer 2000 0 8 13 8 Clint Bowyer 2000 0 8 13
9 Dale Earnhardt, Jr. 2000 0 5 14 9 Dale Earnhardt, Jr. 2000 0 5 14
10 Kurt Busch 2000 0 8 13 10 Kurt Busch 2000 0 8 13
11 Kasey Kahne 2000 2 8 11 11 Kasey Kahne 2000 2 8 11
12 Martin Truex, Jr. 2000 1 6 11 12 Ryan Newman 2000 1 6 12
13 13 Jeff Gordon 2000 0 5 12

(see below)

Team orders controversy[edit]

Team orders became an issue during the last ten laps of the race, and it was ultimately determined that three teams had tried to manipulate the outcome of the race and Chase positions.

Entering the race, there were two Wild Card spots available in the Chase for drivers positioned 11th-20th in the points with race wins. Kasey Kahne had already locked up the first Wild Card spot with two race wins from earlier in the year (Bristol in March, and Pocono in August). Ryan Newman entered the race trailing Martin Truex, Jr. for the final wild card. In order to guarantee a Chase position, he needed to either win the race, or be five points ahead of Truex and not have Joey Logano or Greg Biffle fall out of the top ten. Jeff Gordon trailed Logano by 16 points for 10th place, the final Chase spot based on points position.

On Lap 393, Gordon was ahead of Logano by a large enough margin that Gordon led Logano by two points for the final guaranteed Chase position. Newman was the leader, and would have bumped out both Logano and Truex (one win each) had the race ended at that point. Truex's teammate Clint Bowyer spun out in Turn 4, apparently the result of either being spun by Dale Earnhardt, Jr. or cutting a right front tire. The field pitted under the resulting caution flag, including Bowyer, Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Brian Vickers, Newman and the rest of the field. A slow pit stop for Newman dropped him to third, behind Carl Edwards, Paul Menard, with Kurt Busch starting next to him in 4th.

Truex gained multiple positions. Logano, who was two laps behind the leader (while Gordon was on the lead lap), took the wave around to move up to one lap behind the leaders, where he could race other cars one lap behind in an attempt to gain more positions and overtake Gordon. Edwards went on to win, albeit with controversy as it appeared he jumped Paul Menard on the restart, with Busch and Newman finishing behind Edwards. However, he was not penalized (as had happened to Jimmie Johnson at Dover in June) as it was determined Menard had slid his tires and was slow getting up to speed.

Newman and Truex finished tied for the final wildcard spot on both wins, and the first tie-breaker, points. However, since Truex had an extra second place finish at Texas, he entered the Chase. Logano, who overtook Gordon on the final restart, clinched the final non-wild card spot by one point over Gordon.

Many in the garage immediately suspected that Bowyer had spun out deliberately in an attempt to manipulate the outcome of the race so that Truex would gain a Chase spot, in an incident dubbed the Singapore Sling, after the 2008 SingTel Singapore Grand Prix Formula One race, where Nelson Piquet, Jr. (who at the time of this race was racing in the second-tier Nationwide Series for Turner Scott Motorsports, having raced the previous night) intentionally caused a caution to give an advantage to teammate Fernando Alonso, who would win the race. Earnhardt was directly behind Bowyer at the moment of the spin, and said afterwards that the way Bowyer's car spun was "one of the craziest things he's ever seen". Furthermore, on the video replay, the radio communications between Bowyer and crew chief Brian Pattie showed they were openly worried about the possibility of Newman winning and eliminating Truex from the Chase on lap 391, two laps before Bowyer spun out. Another suspicious conversation was revealed between Vickers and his spotter, team general manager and vice president Ty Norris, where Norris ordered a completely oblivious Vickers to make a green-flag pit stop after the restart on lap 398 in order to give Truex another position to tie Newman in points. These conversations seemed to provide evidence of some kind of manipulation going on vis a vis team orders. In order for the scheme to work, Gordon, who was in 10th place, had to be overtaken by Logano in order to guarantee Truex a wild card. This scandal became known as Spingate from Bowyer's late-race spin.[5]

On September 9, NASCAR threw the book at Michael Waltrip Racing and fined the team $300,000—the highest fine imposed on a team in NASCAR's 67-year history. It also indefinitely suspended Norris, placed all three of MWR crew chiefs on probation until December 31, and docked Bowyer and Truex 50 driver points (Vickers, a Nationwide Series regular, was not eligible for Sprint Cup driver points under the series declaration rule). Each car was also docked 50 owner's points (Waltrip for the #55 and #56, Rob Kauffman for the #15). As this penalty was applied before the reset for the Chase, it effectively knocked Truex out of the Wildcard spot in favor of Newman. The 50-point penalty dropped Truex to 17th in points, removing him from eligibility for a wild-card position. While NASCAR could not find any conclusive evidence that Bowyer had deliberately spun out, it did determine that Vickers' pit on Norris' orders was illegal. The point deduction does not affect Bowyer's post-seeding, as all penalties affected his pre-Chase points total and he had clinched a Chase berth two races earlier. Gordon, meanwhile, remained eliminated from the Chase because he did not have the necessary points to leapfrog Logano for a spot, which drew even more controversy, since Logano was able to overtake Gordon in the ensuing restart after the caution. Logano had to stay in the top ten in order to give Truex a wild card if Newman did not win. Had the caution not occurred, Gordon would likely have clinched a Chase position, since Logano would have remained two laps down.

Shortly after the penalties against Michael Waltrip Racing for trying to manipulate the race, rumors surfaced that Logano may have had assistance from Front Row Motorsports driver David Gilliland. Penske and Front Row are considered technical partners, as they both use Ford cars and Roush Fenway Racing powertrains. Radio communications seemed to indicate that Front Row officials asked Gilliland to slow down and give up a position to Logano in order to help Logano race his way into the Chase, in exchange for an undisclosed form of compensation. Logano passed Gilliland on the final restart.[6]

After a second inquiry, NASCAR placed both Penske and Front Row on probation until December 31, and forced all teams to attend a Saturday afternoon meeting at the 2013 GEICO 400 in Chicagoland, regarding ethics in light of the two related match fixing incidents. NASCAR CEO Brian France announced that Gordon would be added to the Chase field, expanding the field to 13 drivers. In a press conference, France stated that "based on the totality of events that were outside" Gordon's control, Gordon was at an "unfair disadvantage," and, had it not been for Bowyer's spin, Gordon would have qualified for the Chase on points.[7]

NAPA, the primary sponsor of Truex' #56 car, announced on September 19, 2013, that they would withdraw sponsorship of the #56 team at the end of the season as a direct result of the match fixing controversy, choosing instead to align with Hendrick Motorsports and Dale Earnhardt, Jr. for the 2014 season, where Earnhardt's Nationwide Series team JR Motorsports featured Chase Elliott driving a NAPA-sponsored car for his 2014 championship and rookie of the year run in the Nationwide Series, and continued to sponsored Elliott during his Sprint Cup debut in 2015, with a partial run set for his championship debut in 2016, with Axalta covering the remaining races. With the loss of NAPA sponsorship, MWR had to scale the #56 team down to a part-time team for 2014, while Truex and everyone on his pit crew ended up being signed by Furniture Row Racing to replace a departing Kurt Busch, with Truex effectively being Newman's teammate via the satellite team association of Furniture Row and Childress.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2013 Sprint Cup Series Schedule". ESPN. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  2. ^ "2013 Federated Auto Parts 400 weather information". The Old Farmers' Almanac. Retrieved October 9, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Richmond Qualifying and Starting Lineup". ESPN. Jayski's Silly Season Site. September 6, 2013. Retrieved September 7, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Unofficial Race Results for the 56Th Annual Federated Auto Parts 400" (PDF). Jayski. September 7, 2013. Retrieved January 24, 2014. 
  5. ^ Fryer, Jenna (September 16, 2013). "SpinGate: NASCAR Credibility Crisis Began After Clint Bowyer Spun Out At Richmond". HuffPost Sports. Associated Press. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  6. ^ Gilliland, Logano teams investigated
  7. ^ "Gordon added to postseason picture". NASCAR.com. September 13, 2013. Retrieved January 24, 2014. 


Previous race:
2013 AdvoCare 500
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
2013 season
Next race:
2013 GEICO 400