2013 LX28

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2013 LX28
Discovery
Discovered by Pan-STARRS
Discovery date June 12, 2013
Designations
MPC designation 2013 LX28
Apollo asteroid,[1][2]
Venus crosser,
Earth crosser
Orbital characteristics[2][3][4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Aphelion 1.4543719 AU (217.57094 Gm)
Perihelion 0.5488609 AU (82.10842 Gm)
1.00161641 AU (149.839682 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.4520249
1.00 yr (366.14 d)
61.458811°
0° 58m 59.602s /day
Inclination 49.97420°
76.679354°
345.77666°
Earth MOID 0.373137 AU (55.8205 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.8786 AU (580.23 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 130–300 m[a][5]
21.7[2]

2013 LX28, is an asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group that is a temporary quasi-satellite of the Earth, the third known Earth quasi-satellite.[6][7]

Discovery, orbit and physical properties[edit]

2013 LX28 was discovered on June 12, 2013. As of September 2014, it has been observed 26 times with a data-arc span of 349 days. It is an Apollo asteroid and its semi-major axis (1.0016 AU) is very similar to that of the Earth but it has relatively high eccentricity (0.4521) and high orbital inclination (49.9761°). With an absolute magnitude of 21.7, it has a diameter in the range 130–300 m (for an assumed albedo range of 0.04–0.20).

Quasi-satellite dynamical state and orbital evolution[edit]

2013 LX28 has been identified as an Earth quasi-satellite following a kidney-shaped retrograde orbit around the Earth.[6][7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  • ^ This is assuming an albedo of 0.20–0.04.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List Of Apollo Minor Planets (by designation)". Minorplanetcenter.org. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "2013 LX28". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 3643996. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  3. ^ "AstDyS". Hamilton.dm.unipl.it. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  4. ^ "NEODyS". Newton.dm.unipl.it. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  5. ^ "Glossary: Absolute Magnitude (H)". Neo.jpl.nasa.gov. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  6. ^ a b Connors, M. "A Kozai-resonating Earth quasi-satellite". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 437 (1): L85–L89. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.437L..85C. doi:10.1093/mnras/slt147.
  7. ^ a b de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R. "Asteroid 2014 OL339: yet another Earth quasi-satellite". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 445 (3): 2985–2994. arXiv:1409.5588. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.445.2961D. doi:10.1093/mnras/stu1978.
Further reading

External links[edit]