2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

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The 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began in November with the 2K Sports Classic and ended with the Final Four in Indianapolis April 4–6. Practices officially began on October 3.

Season headlines[edit]

  • May 14 – The NCAA announces its Academic Progress Rate (APR) sanctions for the 2014–15 school year. A total of 36 programs in 11 sports are declared ineligible for postseason play due to failure to meet the required APR benchmark, including the following eight Division I men's basketball teams:[1]
  • May 16 – The ACC and the SEC will use a 30-second shot clock during exhibition games on an experimental basis for the upcoming season.[2][3]
  • June 10 – Georgetown and Syracuse announce that their men's basketball rivalry, on hold since 2013 due to the Big East realignment, will resume in 2015–16. The initial contract will run for four seasons.[4]
  • November 3 – The AP preseason All-American team is named. North Carolina junior guard Marcus Paige is the leading vote-getter with 57 of 65 possible votes. Joining him on the team were Louisville junior forward Montrezl Harrell (56 votes), Wisconsin senior center Frank Kaminsky, Wichita State junior guard Fred VanVleet and Duke freshman center Jahlil Okafor. Okafor was also the preseason Player of the Year.[5]
  • November 13 – The NCAA announced five future Final Four sites which include Glendale, Arizona (2017), San Antonio (2018), Minneapolis (2019), Atlanta (2020), and Indianapolis (2021).[6]
  • December 6 – NJIT, the lone Independent in Division 1 basketball, upsets 17th-ranked Michigan.[7]
  • January 2 – Cincinnati head coach Mick Cronin was placed in an advisory role to the team for the remainder of the season while dealing with a non-life-threatening vascular condition known as arterial dissection.[8]
  • February 3 – Turner Sports and CBS Sports announced that Bill Raftery and Grant Hill will replace Greg Anthony to call the 2015 NCAA tournament with the team of Jim Nantz and reporter Tracy Wolfson.[9]
  • February 4 – Syracuse announces that it has self-imposed a postseason ban in response to an ongoing NCAA investigation into infractions that occurred over much of the early 21st century.[10]
  • February 7 – Former North Carolina coach Dean Smith dies at his home in Chapel Hill at the age of 83.[11]
  • February 11 – Former UNLV coach Jerry Tarkanian died at the age of 84.[12]
  • March 6 – The NCAA announced the results of its investigation of the Syracuse men's basketball and football programs, levying the following penalties on the basketball program:[13][14]
    • A total of 108 wins in the 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2010–11, and 2011–12 seasons were ordered vacated. This was the most wins ever taken away from a Division I men's program, and dropped Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim from second on the all-time Division I wins list to sixth.
    • Boeheim was initially suspended for the first nine games of the 2015–16 ACC season, which was later modified to the first 9 games immediately following the ruling of the NCAA Board of Appeals, beginning with the renewed rivalry game against The Georgetown University Hoyas [15]
    • The program initially lost three scholarships for each of the following four seasons (through 2018–19), later reduced to two per season following an appeal by the University to the NCAA.[16]
    • Recruiting was restricted for two seasons, and the program was placed on probation for five years.
  • March 18 – In the wake of the Syracuse sanctions, Boeheim announces that he will retire at the end of the 2017–18 season, with top assistant Mike Hopkins his planned successor. Syracuse athletic director Daryl Gross announces his resignation, effective immediately.[17]

Milestones and records[edit]

Conference membership changes[edit]

The 2014–15 season saw the final wave of membership changes resulting from a major realignment of NCAA Division I conferences. The cycle began in 2010 with the Big Ten and the then-Pac-10 publicly announcing their intentions to expand. The fallout from these conferences' moves later affected a majority of D-I conferences.

School Former conference New conference
Appalachian State Mountaineers Southern Sun Belt
Davidson Wildcats Southern Atlantic 10
East Carolina Pirates C-USA The American
East Tennessee State Buccaneers Atlantic Sun Southern
Elon Phoenix Southern CAA
Georgia Southern Eagles Southern Sun Belt
Idaho Vandals WAC Big Sky
Louisville Cardinals The American ACC
Maryland Terrapins ACC Big Ten
Mercer Bears Atlantic Sun Southern
Oral Roberts Golden Eagles Southland The Summit
Rutgers Scarlet Knights The American Big Ten
Tulane Green Wave C-USA The American
Tulsa Golden Hurricane C-USA The American
VMI Keydets Big South Southern
Western Kentucky Hilltoppers Sun Belt C-USA

This was also the final season for Texas–Pan American (UTPA) under that name. At the start of the 2015–16 school year, UTPA merged with the University of Texas at Brownsville to form the new University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV). UTPA's athletic program and WAC membership were inherited by UTRGV.

It was also the final season for Northern Kentucky in the Atlantic Sun Conference (A-Sun) and the final season for NJIT as an independent. On May 11, 2015, it was announced that Northern Kentucky would join the Horizon League effective July 1.[35] The A-Sun soon filled the place left by Northern Kentucky, announcing on June 12 that NJIT would become a member effective on July 1.[36]

Season outlook[edit]

Pre-season polls[edit]

The top 25 from the AP and USA Today Coaches Polls.

'Associated Press'
Ranking Team
1 Kentucky (52)
2 Arizona (5)
3 Wisconsin (8)
4 Duke
5 Kansas
6 North Carolina
7 Florida
8 Louisville
9 Virginia
10 Texas
11 Wichita State
12 Villanova
13 Gonzaga
14 Iowa State
15 VCU
16 San Diego State
17 Connecticut
18 Michigan State
19 Oklahoma
20 Ohio State
21 Nebraska
22 SMU
23 Syracuse
24 Michigan
25 Utahт
Harvardт
USA Today Coaches[37]
Ranking Team
1 Kentucky (24)
2 Arizona (3)
3 Duke (2)
4 Wisconsin (3)
5 Kansas
6 North Carolina
7 Florida
8 Virginia
9 Louisville
10 Texas
11 Wichita State
12 Villanova
13 Gonzaga
14 Iowa State
15 Connecticut
16 VCU
17 San Diego State
18 Michigan State
19 Oklahoma
20 Ohio State
21 Nebraska
22 SMU
23 Michigan
24 Syracuse
25 Iowa

Regular season[edit]

Early-season tournaments[edit]

Name Dates Location No. teams Champion
NIT Season Tip-Off November 26–28 Madison Square Garden
(New York City)
4 Gonzaga
2K Sports Classic November 20–21 Madison Square Garden
(New York City)
4* Texas
Puerto Rico Tip-Off November 20–21, 23 Roberto Clemente Coliseum
(San Juan, Puerto Rico)
8 West Virginia
Charleston Classic November 20–21, 23 TD Arena
(Charleston, South Carolina)
8 Miami (FL)
Coaches vs. Cancer Classic November 21–22 Barclays Center
(Brooklyn, New York)
4* Duke
Paradise Jam Tournament November 21–24 Sports and Fitness Center
(Saint Thomas, VI)
8 Seton Hall
Hall of Fame Tip Off November 22–23 Mohegan Sun
(Uncasville, Connecticut)
4 Providence (Naismith)

Northeastern (Springfield)

MGM Grand Main Event November 24, 26 MGM Grand Garden Arena
(Las Vegas)
4* Oklahoma State
Corpus Christi Coastal Classic November 28–29 American Bank Center
(Corpus Christi, Texas)
4* TCU
CBE Hall of Fame Classic November 24–25 Sprint Center
(Kansas City, Missouri)
4* Maryland
Legends Classic November 24–25 Barclays Center
(Brooklyn, New York)
4* Villanova
Gulf Coast Showcase November 24–26 Germain Arena
(Estero, Florida)
8 Green Bay
Maui Invitational Tournament November 24–26 Lahaina Civic Center
(Lahaina, HI)
8* Arizona
Cancún Challenge November 25–26 Moon Palace Golf & Spa Resort
(Cancún, MX)
8 Northern Iowa (Riviera Division)
North Florida (Mayan Division)
Great Alaska Shootout November 26–29 Sullivan Arena
(Anchorage, AK)
8 Colorado State
Battle 4 Atlantis November 26–28 Imperial Arena
(Nassau, BAH)
8 Wisconsin
Old Spice Classic November 27–28, 30 HP Field House
(Lake Buena Vista, Florida)
8 Kansas
Wooden Legacy November 27–28, 30 Anaheim Convention Center
(Anaheim, California)
8 Washington
Las Vegas Invitational November 27–28 Orleans Arena
(Las Vegas)
4* Illinois
Emerald Coast Classic November 28–29 Emerald Coast Classic Arena
(Niceville, Florida)
4* Ole Miss
Barclays Center Classic November 28–29 Barclays Center
(Brooklyn, New York)
4* Virginia
Las Vegas Classic December 22–23 Orleans Arena
(Las Vegas)
4* Loyola–Chicago
Diamond Head Classic December 22–23, 25 Stan Sheriff Center
(Honolulu, HI)
8 George Washington

*Although these tournaments include more teams, only the number listed play for the championship.

Conference winners and tournaments[edit]

Thirty-one athletic conferences each end their regular seasons with a single-elimination tournament. The teams in each conference that win their regular season title are given the number one seed in each tournament. The winners of these tournaments receive automatic invitations to the 2015 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The Ivy League does not have a conference tournament, instead giving their automatic invitation to their regular season champion.

Conference Regular season first place Conference
Player of the Year
Conference
Coach of the Year
Conference
tournament
Tournament
venue (city)
Tournament
winner
America East Conference Albany Jameel Warney, Stony Brook[38] Will Brown, Albany[38] 2015 America East Men's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Albany
American Athletic Conference SMU Nic Moore, SMU[39] Fran Dunphy, Temple[39] 2015 American Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Tournament XL Center
(Hartford, Connecticut)
SMU
Atlantic 10 Conference Davidson Tyler Kalinoski, Davidson[40] Bob McKillop, Davidson[40] 2015 Atlantic 10 Men's Basketball Tournament Barclays Center
(Brooklyn, New York)
VCU
Atlantic Coast Conference Virginia Jahlil Okafor, Duke[41][42] Tony Bennett, Virginia[41][43] 2015 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament Greensboro Coliseum
(Greensboro, North Carolina)
Notre Dame
Atlantic Sun Conference North Florida Ty Greene, USC Upstate[44] Matthew Driscoll, North Florida[44] 2015 Atlantic Sun Men's Basketball Tournament Campus sites North Florida
Big 12 Conference Kansas Buddy Hield, Oklahoma[45] Bob Huggins, West Virginia[45] 2015 Big 12 Men's Basketball Tournament Sprint Center
(Kansas City, Missouri)
Iowa State
Big East Conference Villanova Ryan Arcidiacono, Villanova & Kris Dunn, Providence[46] Jay Wright, Villanova[46] 2015 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament Madison Square Garden
(New York City)
Villanova
Big Sky Conference Eastern Washington & Montana[n 1] Mikh McKinney, Sacramento State[47] Jim Hayford, Eastern Washington
Brian Katz, Sacramento State[48]
2015 Big Sky Conference Men's Basketball Tournament At regular-season champion[c 1] Eastern Washington
Big South Conference Charleston Southern[n 1] & High Point Saah Nimley, Charleston Southern[49] Barclay Radebaugh, Charleston Southern[49] 2015 Big South Conference Men's Basketball Tournament HTC Center
(Conway, South Carolina)
Coastal Carolina
Big Ten Conference Wisconsin Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin[50] Bo Ryan, Wisconsin (coaches)
Mark Turgeon, Maryland (media)[50]
2015 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament United Center
(Chicago)
Wisconsin
Big West Conference UC Davis Corey Hawkins, UC Davis[51] Jim Les, UC Davis[51] 2015 Big West Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Honda Center
(Anaheim, California)
UC Irvine
Colonial Athletic Association James Madison,
Northeastern,
UNC Wilmington &
William & Mary[n 1]
Marcus Thornton, William & Mary[52] Kevin Keatts, UNC Wilmington[52] 2015 CAA Men's Basketball Tournament Royal Farms Arena
(Baltimore)
Northeastern
Conference USA Louisiana Tech Speedy Smith, Louisiana Tech[53] Michael White, Louisiana Tech[53] 2015 Conference USA Men's Basketball Tournament Birmingham–Jefferson Convention Complex
(Birmingham, Alabama)
UAB
Horizon League Valparaiso Keifer Sykes, Green Bay[54] Bryce Drew, Valparaiso[54] 2015 Horizon League Men's Basketball Tournament First round at campus sites
Quarterfinals and semifinals at top seed[c 2]
Final at top remaining seed[c 3]
Valparaiso
Ivy League Harvard Justin Sears, Yale[55] James Jones, Yale[55] No tournament
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Iona David Laury, Iona[56] Kevin Baggett, Rider[57] 2015 MAAC Men's Basketball Tournament Times Union Center
(Albany, New York)
Manhattan
Mid-American Conference Central Michigan[n 1] (West)
Buffalo & Kent State (East)
Justin Moss, Buffalo[58] Keno Davis, Central Michigan[58] 2015 Mid-American Conference Men's Basketball Tournament First round at campus sites
Remainder at Quicken Loans Arena
(Cleveland, Ohio)
Buffalo
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference North Carolina Central Kendall Gray, Delaware State[59] Bobby Collins, Maryland Eastern Shore[59] 2015 MEAC Men's Basketball Tournament Norfolk Scope
(Norfolk, Virginia)
Hampton
Missouri Valley Conference Wichita State Seth Tuttle, Northern Iowa[60] Ben Jacobson, Northern Iowa[61] 2015 Missouri Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Scottrade Center
(St. Louis, Missouri)
Northern Iowa
Mountain West Conference Boise State[n 1] & San Diego State Derrick Marks, Boise State[62] Leon Rice, Boise State[62] 2015 Mountain West Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Thomas & Mack Center
(Paradise, Nevada)
Wyoming
Northeast Conference St. Francis Brooklyn Jalen Cannon, St. Francis Brooklyn[63] Glenn Braica, St. Francis Brooklyn[63] 2015 Northeast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Robert Morris
Ohio Valley Conference Murray State[n 1] (West)
Belmont & Eastern Kentucky (East)
Cameron Payne, Murray State[64] Steve Prohm, Murray State[64] 2015 Ohio Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Nashville Municipal Auditorium
(Nashville, Tennessee)
Belmont
Pac-12 Conference Arizona Joseph Young, Oregon[65] Dana Altman, Oregon[65] 2015 Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament MGM Grand Garden Arena
(Paradise, Nevada)
Arizona
Patriot League Bucknell Tim Kempton Jr., Lehigh[66] Dave Paulsen, Bucknell[66] 2015 Patriot League Men's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Lafayette
Southeastern Conference Kentucky Bobby Portis, Arkansas[67][68] John Calipari, Kentucky[67][68] 2015 SEC Men's Basketball Tournament Bridgestone Arena
(Nashville, Tennessee)
Kentucky
Southern Conference Wofford Karl Cochran, Wofford[69] Mike Young, Wofford[69] 2015 Southern Conference Men's Basketball Tournament U.S. Cellular Center
(Asheville, North Carolina)
Wofford
Southland Conference Stephen F. Austin Thomas Walkup, Stephen F. Austin[70] Brad Underwood, Stephen F. Austin[70] 2015 Southland Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Leonard E. Merrell Center
(Katy, Texas)
Stephen F. Austin
Southwestern Athletic Conference Texas Southern Madarious Gibbs, Texas Southern[71] Mike Davis, Texas Southern[71] 2015 SWAC Men's Basketball Tournament Toyota Center
(Houston, Texas)
Texas Southern
The Summit League North Dakota State &
South Dakota State[n 1]
Lawrence Alexander, North Dakota State[72] David Richman, North Dakota State[72] 2015 The Summit League Men's Basketball Tournament Denny Sanford PREMIER Center
(Sioux Falls, South Dakota)
North Dakota State
Sun Belt Conference Georgia State R. J. Hunter, Georgia State[73] Keith Richard, Louisiana–Monroe[73] 2015 Sun Belt Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Lakefront Arena
(New Orleans)
Georgia State
West Coast Conference Gonzaga Kevin Pangos, Gonzaga[74] Mark Few, Gonzaga[74] 2015 West Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Orleans Arena
(Paradise, Nevada)
Gonzaga
Western Athletic Conference New Mexico State Martez Harrison, UMKC[75] Marvin Menzies, New Mexico State[75] 2015 WAC Men's Basketball Tournament Orleans Arena
(Paradise, Nevada)
New Mexico State
  1. ^ Montana won a tiebreaker with Eastern Washington for the top seed in the conference tournament and hosting rights. The tournament was thus held at Dahlberg Arena in Missoula, Montana.
  2. ^ As Valparaiso won the regular-season league title outright, it hosted the semifinals and finals at the Athletics–Recreation Center in Valparaiso, Indiana.
  3. ^ Since Valparaiso won its conference tournament semifinal, it also hosted the final at the same venue.

Statistical leaders[edit]

Points per game
Rebounds per game
Assists per game
Steals per game
Player School PPG Player School RPG Player School APG Player School SPG
Tyler Harvey Eastern Washington 23.1 Alan Williams UC Santa Barbara 11.8 Jalan West Northwestern State 7.7 Corey Walden Eastern Kentucky 3.09
Zeek Woodley Northwestern State 22.2 Kendall Gray Delaware State 11.8 Kahlil Felder Oakland 7.6 Gary Payton II Oregon State 3.06
Tyler Haws BYU 22.2 Jameel Warney Stony Brook 11.7 Kris Dunn Providence 7.5 Roderick Bobbitt Hawaiʻi 2.86
Damion Lee Drexel 21.4 Rico Gathers Baylor 11.6 Tyler Strange Gardner–Webb 7.4 Kevin Hardy McNeese State 2.74
Saah Nimley Charleston Southern 21.4 Shevon Thompson George Mason 11.3 Speedy Smith Louisiana Tech 7.4 Kris Dunn Providence 2.73
Blocked shots per game
Field goal percentage
Three-point field goal percentage
Free throw percentage
Player School BPG Player School FG% Player School 3FG% Player School FT%
Jordan Mickey LSU 3.65 Evan Bradds Belmont 68.8 Corey Hawkins UC Davis 48.8 Riley Grabau Wyoming 93.9
Amida Brimah Connecticut 3.46 Jahlil Okafor Duke 66.4 Quincy Taylor Longwood 48.0 Joseph Young Oregon 92.5
Austin Nichols Memphis 3.44 Jordan Parks North Carolina Central 66.0 Alex Anderson UT Martin 48.0 Andrew Rowsey UNC Asheville 92.1
Justin Tuoyo Chattanooga 3.25 Rashid Gaston Norfolk State 62.0 John Simons Central Michigan 45.5 Johnny Dee San Diego 91.9
Chris Obekpa St. John's 3.13 Zach Auguste Notre Dame 61.9 Daniel Dixon William & Mary 45.1 Four McGlynn Towson 91/7

Postseason tournaments[edit]

NCAA Tournament[edit]

Final Four – Lucas Oil Stadium

National Semifinals
April 4
National Championship Game
April 6
      
MW1 Kentucky 64
W1 Wisconsin 71
W1 Wisconsin 63
S1 Duke 68
E7 Michigan State 61
S1 Duke 81

Tournament upsets[edit]

For this list, a "major upset" is defined as a win by a team seeded 7 or more spots below its defeated opponent.

Date Winner Score Loser Region Round
March 19 UAB (14) 60–59 Iowa State (3) South Round of 64
March 19 Georgia State (14) 57–56 Baylor (3) West Round of 64
March 21 NC State (8) 81–78 Villanova (1) East Round of 32

National Invitation Tournament[edit]

After the NCAA Tournament field is announced, the NCAA invited 32 teams to participate in the National Invitation Tournament. The tournament began on March 17, 2015 with all games prior to the semifinals played on campus sites. The semifinals and final were held on March 31 and April 2 at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Semifinals
March 31
Championship game
April 2
      
1 Temple 57
2 Miami (FL) 60
2 Miami (FL) 64
2 Stanford 66OT
2 Stanford 67
1 Old Dominion 60

College Basketball Invitational[edit]

The sixth College Basketball Invitational (CBI) Tournament began on March 17, 2015 and ended with Loyola-Chicago's two-game sweep of Louisiana-Monroe. This tournament featured 16 teams who were left out of the NCAA Tournament and NIT.

  Semifinals
March 25
Championship Series
March 31, April 1
(best of three)
                     
Loyola-Chicago 63  
Seattle 48  
    Loyola-Chicago 65 63
  Louisiana–Monroe 58 62
Louisiana–Monroe 71
Vermont 65  

CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament[edit]

The fifth CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament began on March 16 and ended with that championship game on April 2. The Evansville Purple Aces won their first postseason tournament, defeating Northern Arizona in the final. This tournament places an emphasis on selecting successful teams from "mid-major" conferences who were left out of the NCAA Tournament and NIT. 32 teams participated in this tournament.

Semifinals
March 31
Championship
April 2
      
NJIT 61
Northern Arizona 68
Northern Arizona 65
Evansville 71
Tennessee–Martin 66
Evansville 79

Award winners[edit]

Consensus All-American teams[edit]

The following players are recognized as the 2015 Consensus All-Americans:

Consensus First Team
Player Position Class Team
Willie Cauley-Stein PF Junior Kentucky
Jerian Grant PG/SG Senior Notre Dame
Frank Kaminsky C/PF Senior Wisconsin
Jahlil Okafor C Freshman Duke
D'Angelo Russell PG/SG Freshman Ohio State


Consensus Second Team
Player Position Class Team
Malcolm Brogdon SG Junior Virginia
Bobby Portis PF Sophomore Arkansas
Karl-Anthony Towns C Freshman Kentucky
Seth Tuttle PF Senior Northern Iowa
Kyle Wiltjer PF Junior Gonzaga
Delon Wright SG/PG Senior Utah

Major player of the year awards[edit]

Major freshman of the year awards[edit]

Major coach of the year awards[edit]

Other major awards[edit]

Coaching changes[edit]

A number of teams changed coaches during and after the season.

Team Former
coach
Interim
coach
New
coach
Reason
Alabama Anthony Grant John Brannen Avery Johnson After an 18–14 season, Grant, who led the Crimson Tide to just one NCAA Tournament appearance in six seasons, was fired.[88]
Alcorn State Luther Riley Montez Robinson With Riley's teams posting a record of 38-91 over four seasons, include winning just six games the past year, the university decided not to renew his contract. The former coach took a brief leave of absence of January to deal with personal matters. Under Riley's watch, the Braves never finished higher than fifth in the SWAC.
Arizona State Herb Sendek Bobby Hurley Sendek was fired on March 24 after nine seasons. He had signed a three-year contract extension before this season, but went 18–16 and 9–9 in Pac-12 play.[89][90]
Arkansas-Little Rock Steve Shields Chris Beard On March 18, 2015, Shields was let go by the Arkansas–Little Rock administration after 12 seasons. He left as the winningest coach in the Trojans' history with a career record of 192-178. However, despite winning five regular-season Sun Belt titles, Shield's team only won one tournament championship.
Bowling Green Chris Jans Michael Huger Jans was fired on April 2 despite a 21–12 record in his first season in charge. Media reports indicated that the firing was due to alleged inappropriate behavior at a Bowling Green, Ohio bar after the Falcons' final game of the season.[91]
Bradley Geno Ford Brian Wardle Ford was fired after posting a 46–86 record in four seasons at Bradley.[92]
Bucknell Dave Paulsen Nathan Davis Paulsen left to take the George Mason job.[93]
Buffalo Bobby Hurley Nate Oats Hurley left to take the Arizona State job.[94] Assistant coach Nate Oats was promoted to head coach on April 11.[95]
Charlotte Alan Major Ryan Odom Mark Price After Major took a medical on January 6 to deal with chronic health issues, Odom was relieved of his coaching duties on March 16 when Major and the university mutually agreed to part ways, and his staff was not retained.
Chattanooga Will Wade Matt McCall Wade, who was the first assistant Shaka Smart hired upon taking over the VCU program in 2009, returned to VCU after Smart's departure for Texas.[96]
The Citadel Chuck Driesell Duggar Baucom Driesell's contract was not renewed following the season.[97]
DePaul Oliver Purnell Dave Leitao Purnell resigned after posting an overall record of 54–105 (15-75 in Big East play) in five seasons.[98] The Blue Demons brought back Dave Leitao, who had been head coach from 2002 to 2005, a stint that included the team's last NCAA tournament appearance (2004).[99]
Eastern Kentucky Jeff Neubauer Dan McHale
East Tennessee State Murry Bartow Steve Forbes After 12 years, an overall record of 224-169 (with a record of 16-14, 8-10 in SoCon play in the 2014–15 season), and three NCAA appearances at East Tennessee State, Bartow was fired due a five-season tournament drought with declining team performance, increasing fan apathy after the 2014–15 season, and the decision to head a new way with the program.[100]
Florida Billy Donovan Michael White Donovan left on April 30 to fill the head coaching vacancy at the Oklahoma City Thunder. In Donovan's 19 seasons at Florida, the Gators had an overall record of 467–186, 14 NCAA tournament appearances, and national championships in 2006 and 2007.[101]
Fordham Tom Pecora Jeff Neubauer Fordham hired Eastern Kentucky coach Jeff Neubauer to fill their vacant spot.[102]
George Mason Paul Hewitt Dave Paulsen Hewitt, formerly head coach of Georgia Tech from 2000–2011, was fired after posting a 66–67 record in four seasons with George Mason.[103]
Green Bay Brian Wardle Linc Darner Wardle left Green Bay after five seasons to accept the head coaching job with Bradley on March 27.[104]
Hawaii Benjy Taylor Eran Ganot
Holy Cross Milan Brown Bill Carmody Brown was relieved of his duties following the Crusaders' season ending loss to Bucknell in the Patriot League Tournament on March 5. Brown had a 56–67 record over five seasons, with just one postseason appearance.[105]
Iowa State Fred Hoiberg Steve Prohm Hoiberg, long rumored as an NBA coaching prospect, left for the head coaching vacancy with the Chicago Bulls.[106]
Kennesaw State Jimmy Lallathin Al Skinner Lallathin was fired on March 23 after only one season as the full-time head coach. He had received the job on an interim basis in January 2014 when previous head coach Lewis Preston took a leave of absence, and was given the full-time job after Preston was dismissed at the end of that season, but went 10–22 in his first full season in charge.[107]
Liberty Dale Layer Ritchie McKay Layer had led the Flames to the Big South Conference championship in 2013, but had only one winning season in five years. He was fired following Liberty's loss to UNC Asheville in the Big South Tournament.[108]
Louisiana Tech Michael White Eric Konkol White left for the Florida job. He was replaced by Miami assistant Konkol.[109]
Mississippi State Rick Ray Ben Howland Ray was fired on March 21, 2015 after going 37–60 in three seasons, ending with a 13–19 overall record and 6–12 in SEC play this season.[110] The Bulldogs hired TV analyst Howland, a veteran coach best known for leading UCLA to three straight Final Fours from 2006 to 2008.[111]
Murray State Steve Prohm Matt McMahon Prohm left for the Iowa State job.[112]
Nevada David Carter Eric Musselman Carter was fired on March 11, 2015 after going 9–22 overall and 5–13 in Mountain West play this season, and failing to make the NCAA tournament in his six seasons at head coach.[113][114]
Northern Kentucky Dave Bezold John Brannen Bezold was fired on March 17 after 11 seasons. Although he went 194–133 overall, he was 33–54 in the first three years of NKU's four-year transition from Division II to Division I.[115]
Penn Jerome Allen Steve Donahue On March 8, Allen announced his resignation to follow the Quakers' last game on March 10.[116]
St. John's Steve Lavin Chris Mullin Lavin and St. John's mutually agreed to part ways on March 28.[117] The Red Storm hired arguably their greatest player ever, Hall of Famer Mullin, who since retiring as a player has been in the front offices of the Golden State Warriors and Sacramento Kings.[118]
San Diego Bill Grier Lamont Smith Grier was fired on March 16 after eight seasons. He was unable to duplicate the success of his first season in 2007–08, when he led the Toreros to the first NCAA tournament win by either of San Diego's Division I programs. The Toreros only made one postseason appearance after that (last season's CIT), and finished 15–16 this season and 8–10 in the West Coast Conference.[119]
SIU Edwardsville Lennox Forrester Jon Harris Forrester, who oversaw the Cougars' transition from Division II to Division I, was fired after eight seasons and an 82–146 overall record.[120]
Southeast Missouri State Dickey Nutt Rick Ray Nutt was fired on March 23 after six seasons. He was coming off back-to-back winning records, but the Redhawks went 13–17 this season, leaving him at 90–108 overall at SEMO.[121]
Tennessee Donnie Tyndall Rick Barnes Tyndall was fired on March 28 after the school was briefed by the NCAA on accusations it was about to level against him stemming from his actions at his previous coaching stop at Southern Miss.[122] The Volunteers hired Rick Barnes fresh off his firing from Texas.[123]
Texas Rick Barnes Shaka Smart Barnes was notified on March 28 that he had been fired. Despite a 402–180 record in 17 seasons at Texas, this season's Longhorns, widely touted as a Big 12 contender and ranked in the preseason top 10, finished 20–14 overall and 8–10 in the Big 12, ending in defeat in their NCAA tournament opener.-[124]
UIC Howard Moore Steve McClain Moore was fired after four seasons in which the Flames went 33–62 overall and 12–40 in the Horizon League.[125]
Utah State Stew Morrill Tim Duryea[126] Morrill, head coach for the Aggies since 1998, announced his retirement effective at the end of the season.[127]
Utah Valley Dick Hunsaker Mark Pope Hunsaker announced he would step down from his position effective June 30, 2015.[128] The Wolverines, based in Orem, Utah, went next door to Provo for their new coach, hiring BYU assistant Pope.[129]
VCU Shaka Smart Will Wade Smart left for the Texas job.[130]
VMI Duggar Baucom Dan Earl Baucom left for the Southern Conference's other military school, The Citadel.[131]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Top seed in conference tournament

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Student-Athleties Continue To Achieve Academically" (Press release). NCAA. May 14, 2014. Retrieved May 19, 2014. 
  2. ^ "ACC to try 30-second shot clock". ESPN. May 15, 2014. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  3. ^ "SEC basketball coaches approve experimentation of 30-second shot clock". NOLA.com. May 28, 2014. Retrieved May 28, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Georgetown-Cuse rivalry to resume". ESPN. June 10, 2014. Retrieved June 10, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Wichita State's Fred VanVleet named to AP preseason All-America team". Kansas.com. November 3, 2014. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Five future Final Four sites announced". NCAA. December 6, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2015. 
  7. ^ "NJIT shows how far it has come in victory versus No. 17 Michigan". NCAA. December 6, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Mick Cronin to oversee remainder of Cincinnati season in advisory role". NCAA. January 2, 2015. Retrieved February 24, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Hill, Raftery added to Final Four, national championship broadcast team". NCAA. February 3, 2015. Retrieved February 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Syracuse self-imposes ban". ESPN. February 4, 2015. Retrieved February 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Carolina's Dean Smith passes away at age 83". UNC. February 7, 2015. Retrieved February 24, 2015. 
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