2014 AF5

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2014 AF5
Discovery[1]
Discovered byCatalina Sky Survey (703)
Discovery date2 January 2014
Designations
MPC designation2014 AF5
Apollo, NEO[2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 7
Aphelion2.3810 AU (356.19 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion0.75353 AU (112.726 Gm) (q)
1.5672 AU (234.45 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity0.51920 (e)
1.96 yr (716.64 d)
35.862° (M)
0° 30m 8.424s / day (n)
Inclination6.4141° (i)
100.66° (Ω)
288.71° (ω)
Earth MOID0.000570632 AU (85,365.3 km)
Jupiter MOID3.08041 AU (460.823 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions~7 meters (23 ft)
5–10 meters
Mass5×105 kg (assumed)
28.8[2]

2014 AF5 (also written 2014 AF5) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 5–10 meters in diameter that passed less than 1 lunar distance from Earth on 1 January 2014.[3]

Description[edit]

From mid November 2013 until 1 January 2014 15:00 UT the small dim asteroid had an elongation less than 45 degrees from the Sun with an undetectable apparent magnitude of around 30.[4] While less than 18 degrees from the Sun any dim asteroid can be lost in astronomical twilight. On 1 January 2014 10:00 UT the asteroid passed 0.00062 AU (93,000 km; 58,000 mi) from the Moon and at 16:13 UT passed 0.00064 AU (96,000 km; 59,000 mi) from Earth.[3] The asteroid was then discovered on 2 January 2014 by the Catalina Sky Survey at an apparent magnitude of 18.9 using a 0.68-meter (27 in) Schmidt–Cassegrain telescope.[1] By 3 January 2014 the asteroid was becoming dimmer than apparent magnitude 20.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2014-A19 : 2014 AF5". IAU Minor Planet Center. 4 January 2014. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014. (K14A05F)
  2. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2014 AF5)" (last observation: 2012-10-09; arc: 1 day). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 4 April 2016.
  3. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2014 AF5)" (last observation: 2012-10-09; arc: 1 day). Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  4. ^ a b "2014AF5 Ephemerides for 15 November 2013 through 10 January 2014". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014.

External links[edit]