2014 UZ224

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2014 UZ224
Orbit of 2014 UZ224.png
Orbit of 2014 UZ224
Discovery[1]
Discovery date 19 August 2014
announced: 11 October 2016
Designations
MPC designation 2014 UZ224
TNO, SDO
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 7
Observation arc 699 days (1.91 yr)
Aphelion 180 AU (27 Tm) ± 12 (Q)
Perihelion 37.97 AU (5.680 Tm) ± 0.69 (q)
108.9 AU (16.29 Tm) ± 7.4 (a)
Eccentricity 0.65136 (e)
1136.42 yr (415076 d)
320.2683° (M)
0° 0m 3.122s /day (n)
Inclination 26.7851° (i)
131.1421° (Ω)
29.5472° (ω)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 635+65
−72
 km
[3]
0.131+0.038
−0.028
[3]
23.2
3.5 (JPL/MPC)[2]

2014 UZ224 is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) and possible dwarf planet orbiting in the scattered disc. As of October 10, 2016, it was approximately 91.6 astronomical units (1.370×1010 km) from the Sun, and will slowly decrease in distance until it reaches its perihelion of 38 AU sometime near 2142. As of February 2017, 2014 UZ224 is the third-furthest known observable Solar System object from the Sun, after Eris (96.2 AU) and V774104 (<96 AU?). The discoverers have nicknamed it "DeeDee" for "Distant Dwarf".[4][5]

2014 UZ224 was discovered by a team led by David Gerdes using data collected by the large camera Dark Energy Camera (DECam).[6][7] It has a diameter of ~635 km (395 mi) and reflects just 13 percent of the sunlight that hits it on its 1,136 year orbit around the sun.[3][2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC MPEC 2016-T104 : 2014 UZ224". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2016-10-11. Retrieved 2016-10-11. (K14UM4Z)
  2. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2014 UZ224)" (last observation: 2016-07-18; arc: 1.91 years). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "DISCOVERY AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LARGE SCATTERED DISK OBJECT AT 92 AU" (PDF). arXiv:1702.00731. Bibcode:2017ApJ...839L..15G. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa64d8., 2017
  4. ^ https://www.wired.com/2016/10/dwarf-planets-arent-big-news-astronomy-great-job
  5. ^ "New dwarf planet solar system's 2nd most distant". Umich.edu.
  6. ^ Cofield,SPACE.com, Calla. "New Dwarf Planet Found in Our Solar System". Scientific American. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  7. ^ "A Friend for Pluto: Astronomers Find New Dwarf Planet in Our Solar System".
  8. ^ a b "AstDyS-2, Asteroids - Dynamic Site". Retrieved 2018-04-03. Objects with distance from Sun over 59 AU

External links[edit]