2015 BP513

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2015 BP513
Discovery [1][2][3]
Discovered byPan-STARRS 1
(first observered)
Discovery siteHaleakala Obs.
Discovery date27 January 2015
Designations
MPC designation2015 BP513
Apollo · NEO[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 7
Observation arc yr (10 days)
Aphelion2.5160 AU
Perihelion0.9450 AU
1.7305 AU
Eccentricity0.4539
2.28 yr (831 days)
338.74°
0° 25m 58.8s / day
Inclination0.4894°
115.43°
333.76°
Earth MOID0.0004 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions12–27 meters[4]
26.7[1]

2015 BP513 (also written 2015 BP513) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid roughly 12–27 meters in diameter that passed less than 1 lunar distance from Earth on 18 January 2015.[5]

2015 flyby[edit]

Until 18 January 2015 18:00 UT the small dim asteroid either had an elongation less than 45 degrees from the Sun or was significantly fainter than apparent magnitude 23.[6] On 18 January 2015 13:36 UT the asteroid passed 0.00082 AU (123,000 km; 76,000 mi) from the Moon and at 17:09 UT passed 0.0016 AU (240,000 km; 150,000 mi) from Earth.[5] The asteroid was not discovered until 9 days later on 27 January 2015 by Pan-STARRS at an apparent magnitude of 21 using a 1.8-meter (71 in) Ritchey–Chrétien telescope.[3] Two precovery images from 19 January 2015 when the asteroid was apparent magnitude 16 were then located.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2015 BP513)" (2015-01-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "2015 BP513". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b "MPEC 2015-B169: 2015 BP513". IAU Minor Planet Center. 30 January 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2015. (K15Bp3P)
  4. ^ "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  5. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2015 BP513)" (last observation: 2015-01-29; arc: 10 days). Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  6. ^ "2015BP513 Ephemerides for 15 January 2015 through 1 February 2015". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 4 February 2015.

External links[edit]