2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship

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Coordinates: 42°56′48″N 76°09′16″W / 42.94667°N 76.15444°W / 42.94667; -76.15444

2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship
2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship logo.png
Tournament details
Host country  Iroquois
Dates September 18–27, 2015
Teams 13
Venue(s) (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Gold Gold medal blank.svg  Canada (4th title)
Silver Silver medal blank.svg  Iroquois
Bronze Bronze medal blank.svg  United States
Fourth place  Israel
Tournament statistics
Matches played 46
Goals scored 1075 (23.37 per match)
Attendance 10,421 (gold and bronze medal games)
Scoring leader(s) Turkey Anthony Terranova (67 pts)
MVP Canada Shawn Evans
2011
2019

The 2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship (WILC) was the fourth international box lacrosse championship organized by the Federation of International Lacrosse every four years. The 2015 WILC was hosted by the Onondaga Nation, south of Syracuse, New York, and took place between September 18 and 27.[1] Canada defeated the host Iroquois Nationals 12–8 in the gold medal game, the same finals match-up featured in all four indoor championships.[2] Since the WILC started in 2003, Team Canada is undefeated with an overall record of 23–0.[3]

In the bronze medal game, the United States beat first-time participant Israel 15–4.[4] Canadian Shawn Evans was the tournament MVP, scoring 10 goals and 25 assists in 5 games.[5]

13 countries participated, 5 more than in 2011, including first-time competitors Finland, Germany, Israel, Serbia, Switzerland, and Turkey.[6] Most games were held on the Onondaga Nation at the Onondaga Nation Arena and the newly-built $6.5 million Onondaga Nation Fieldhouse, although the Iroquois' games versus Canada and the United States were held at War Memorial Arena in Syracuse.[7][8] Over 10,000 fans attended the gold and bronze medal games in the Carrier Dome.[9]

The opening ceremonies in the sold-out War Memorial Arena featured a light show about the Haudenosaunee creation story and traditional dancing.[10] After the Iroquois Nationals were not allowed to use their Haudenosaunee passports to travel to England in 2010 due to new security requirements, many international players were interested in getting their passports stamped by the Onondaga Nation.[11] The documentary Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation explains the meaning of lacrosse to the Iroquois people and covers the Iroquois Nationals in the 2015 WILC, featuring brothers Lyle and Miles Thompson.[12]

Venues[edit]

Onondaga Reservation Syracuse
2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship is located in New York
Onondaga Reservation
Onondaga Reservation
Syracuse
Syracuse
Host sites of the 2015 WILC
Tsha'Hon'nonyen'dakhwa
(Onondaga Nation Arena)
Capacity: 3,000
42°57′58″N 76°8′22″W / 42.96611°N 76.13944°W / 42.96611; -76.13944 (2015 WILC)
Carrier Dome
Capacity: 28,000
43°2′10″N 76°8′11″W / 43.03611°N 76.13639°W / 43.03611; -76.13639 (2015 WILC)
Tsha’ Thoñ’nhes
(Onondaga Nation Fieldhouse)
Capacity: 300
42°56′48″N 76°09′17″W / 42.94667°N 76.15472°W / 42.94667; -76.15472 (2015 WILC)
War Memorial Arena
Capacity: 6,000
43°2′41″N 76°8′54″W / 43.04472°N 76.14833°W / 43.04472; -76.14833 (2015 WILC)

Pool play[edit]

The teams were divided into 3 divisions, with the 5 highest-ranked teams placed in the Blue Division and the others being split into the Red and Green Divisions. In the Blue Division, the top two teams advanced to the semifinals, the third and fourth teams entered the quarterfinals and the fifth team was placed in the classification bracket. The top two teams in both the Red and Green Divisions entered the play-in games, while the bottom two teams were placed in the classification bracket.

Blue Division[edit]

Canada once again was undefeated in pool play, although they had a tough game versus the Iroquois.[13] The Nationals lead 8–4 early in the third period, but were outscored 7–1 the rest of the game.[14]

Team GP W L GF GA DIF Advanced to
 Canada 4 4 0 67 20 +47 Semifinals
 Iroquois 4 3 1 59 30 +29 Semifinals
 United States 4 2 2 43 47 -4 Quarterfinals
 Czech Republic 4 1 3 22 57 -35 Quarterfinals
England England 4 0 4 24 61 -37 Play-in games
September 18 Iroquois  13–9
 United States
September 19 Czech Republic  9–7
England England
September 20 United States  14–7
 Czech Republic
September 20 Iroquois  9–11
 Canada
September 21 United States  13–9
England England
September 21  Canada 19–2
 Czech Republic
September 22 England England 6–20
 Iroquois
September 22 Canada  18–7
 United States
September 23 England England 2–19
 Canada
September 23 Czech Republic  4–17
 Iroquois


Red Division[edit]

Team GP W L GF GA DIF Advanced to
 Australia 3 3 0 49 29 +20 Play-in games
Finland Finland 3 2 1 37 22 +15 Play-in games
Turkey Turkey 3 1 2 39 40 -1 Classification bracket
Switzerland Switzerland 3 0 3 17 51 -34 Classification bracket
September 18 Switzerland Switzerland 6–12
Turkey Turkey
September 18 Australia  7–6
Finland Finland
September 19 Finland Finland 18–5
Switzerland Switzerland
September 19 Turkey Turkey 17–21
 Australia
September 20 Switzerland Switzerland 6–21
 Australia
September 20 Finland Finland 13–10
Turkey Turkey


Green Division[edit]

Team GP W L GF GA DIF Advanced to
Israel Israel 3 2 1 36 24 +12 Play-in games
Republic of Ireland Ireland 3 2 1 27 29 -2 Play-in games
Serbia Serbia 3 1 2 29 36 -7 Classification bracket
Germany Germany 3 1 2 27 30 -3 Classification bracket
September 18 Israel Israel 15–8
Serbia Serbia
September 18 Ireland Republic of Ireland 10–7
Germany Germany
September 19 Serbia Serbia 10–11
Republic of Ireland Ireland
September 19 Germany Germany 10–9
Israel Israel
September 20 Israel Israel 12–6
Republic of Ireland Ireland
September 20 Germany Germany 10–11
Serbia Serbia


Play-in games[edit]

September 21 Israel Israel 14–4
Finland Finland
September 21 Australia  4–12
Republic of Ireland Ireland
September 22 Ireland Republic of Ireland 7–12
Israel Israel


Israel was seeded #5 and Ireland #6 in the quarterfinals. Finland and Australia were placed in the classification bracket.

Championship bracket[edit]

The gold medal game was close throughout the first half, with only two brief two-goal leads for Canada. Canada led 6–5 at the half, then the teams traded two-goal runs to get back to 8–7 in the early fourth quarter. Steven Priolo and Stephan Leblanc both scored in unsettled situations within a minute of each other for Canada to take command of the game with 10 minutes left.[9]

Team Canada's Curtis Dickson led all scorers with four goals, including one open-net goal, and an assist. His teammate Mark Matthews had four assists. Randy Staats and Johnny Powless both had four points for the Iroquois.[15]

Quarterfinals
September 24
Semifinals
September 25
Gold medal game
September 27
   
 Canada 19  
Israel Israel 13  
Israel Israel 3    
 Czech Republic 12  
   Canada 12
 
     Iroquois 8
 Iroquois 17
 United States 22  
 United States 10  
Republic of Ireland Ireland 2  
Bronze medal game
 
 United States 15
Israel Israel 4

Classification bracket[edit]

September 21 Serbia Serbia 9–7
Switzerland Switzerland
September 21 Turkey Turkey 21–16
Germany Germany
September 22 Finland Finland 8–12
 Australia
September 22 Turkey Turkey 12–16
Serbia Serbia
September 22 Germany Germany 16–8
Switzerland Switzerland
September 24 Serbia Serbia 13–17
 Australia
September 24 Turkey Turkey 15–12
Switzerland Switzerland
September 25 Finland Finland 11–9
Germany Germany
September 25 Turkey Turkey 25–18
Serbia Serbia
September 25 England England 13–12
 Australia
September 25 Czech Republic  13–14
Republic of Ireland Ireland
September 26 Ireland Republic of Ireland 12–14
England England 5th place
September 26 Australia  11–20
 Czech Republic 7th place
September 26 Finland Finland 24–6
Turkey Turkey 9th place
September 26 Serbia Serbia 12–13
Germany Germany 11th place


Ranking, leaders, and awards[edit]

Final ranking[edit]

1st, gold medalist(s)  Canada
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Iroquois
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  United States
4 Israel Israel
5 England England
6 Republic of Ireland Ireland
7  Czech Republic
8  Australia
9 Finland Finland
10 Turkey Turkey
11 Germany Germany
12 Serbia Serbia
13 Switzerland Switzerland

Scoring leaders[edit]

Player G A Pts
Turkey Anthony Terranova 42 25 67
Turkey Dave Deriso 34 17 51
United States Joe Walters 14 30 44
Finland Roope Jokela 22 20 42
Turkey Joseph Rainoldi 25 16 41
Australia Caleb Hall 21 19 40
Republic of Ireland Stephen Keogh 19 21 40
Australia Matthew Taylor 23 15 38
Israel Chad Culp 12 25 37
Finland Robert Raittila 19 16 35
Source: [16]

Goaltending leaders[edit]

Player GP SV GA Sv%
Canada Matt Vinc 6 91 16 85%
Iroquois Angus Goodleaf 6 178 48 79%
Republic of Ireland Micahel Cregan 8 319 90 78%
England Nick Rose 6 275 80 77%
Finland Lauri Uusitalo 7 176 54 77%
Israel Zachary Higgins 8 231 70 77%
Turkey Scott Komer 8 300 92 77%
Minimum 75 saves. Source: [17]

All World Team[edit]

Forwards

Iroquois Lyle Thompson
Canada Mark Matthews

Transition

Iroquois Jeff Shattler

Defense

Iroquois Sid Smith
Canada Chris Corbell

Goaltender

Canada Matt Vinc

Most Valuable Player

Canada Shawn Evans

Source: [18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lacrosse is Coming Home to Onondaga Nation". Federation of International Lacrosse (Press release). 2 April 2015. 
  2. ^ Rogers, Daniels (September 27, 2015). "World Indoor Lacrosse Championship 2015 Results: Medal Winners and Final Scores". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  3. ^ "WILC Highlights: Canada's Indoor Reign Continues". Inside Lacrosse. September 27, 2015. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  4. ^ Conwell, Ryan (September 28, 2015). "Team USA Settles With Bronze, Defeats Israel 15-4". Lacrosse All Stars. Retrieved 19 November 2017. 
  5. ^ Arnold, Ed (September 29, 2015). "Winning gold a family affair for world indoor lacrosse championship MVP Shawn Evans". Peterborough Examiner. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  6. ^ Moses, Sarah (September 17, 2015). "5 things to know about 2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship". Syracuse.com. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  7. ^ Moses, Sarah (September 11, 2015). "Onondaga Nation builds $6.5M arena in record time for lacrosse championship". Syracuse.com. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  8. ^ "Tsha' Thoñ'nhes - About Us". Onondaga Nation. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Ditota, Donna (September 27, 2015). "Canada dashes Iroquois' dream, continues domination in World Indoor Lacrosse Championship". Syracuse.com. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  10. ^ Moses, Sarah (September 22, 2015). "World Indoor Lacrosse Championship opening ceremony, games on YouTube". Syracuse.com. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  11. ^ Schilling, Vincent (September 17, 2015). "International Teams Line Up for Onondaga Passport Stamps at World Indoor Lacrosse Championships". Indian Country Today. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  12. ^ Morris, Amy (May 26, 2017). "Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Documentary Premieres: Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation". Indian Country Today. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  13. ^ Schilling, Vincent (September 21, 2015). "Iroquois Nationals Drop Squeaker to Team Canada in Worlds". Indian Country Today. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  14. ^ "Iroquois - Canada 9:11". pointbench.com. WILC. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  15. ^ "Canada - Iroquois 12:8". pointbench.com. WILC. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  16. ^ "Points". Federation of International Lacrosse. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  17. ^ "Goaltender stats". Federation of International Lacrosse. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  18. ^ "WILC 2015 Awards" (Press release). Federation of International Lacrosse. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 

External links[edit]